Bore sighter

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by kstrick, Nov 24, 2008.

  1. kstrick

    kstrick Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    140
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2008
    Can anyone give me advice about a good bore sight system?
    Thanks
    Ken gun)
     
  2. old_heli_logger

    old_heli_logger Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    360
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2006
    Don't waste your money. Just set your rifle on your sandbags, pull the bolt, line-up your bore with the target (start at 50 yards), without moving the rifle, adjust your scope to the same target. That should get you on paper...and then fine tune your scope settings.

    Good luck!
     

  3. britz

    britz Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,217
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2007
    +1 for O_H_L ;)
     
  4. kstrick

    kstrick Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    140
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2008
    Yeah...that is how I generally site in a scope. Problem is when I want to check the scope when I can't shoot a few rounds first. For example...last weekend I 4- wheeled over some pretty tough country - thought it would be a good idea to shoot a few rounds yesterday. The gun went from 1/2" group at 100 yards to 6" high and left.
    I 100% agree - taking a gun to the range is the best way to test a scope...I just want to have confidence in my gun and scope if I can't sight in before I head out.
     
  5. britz

    britz Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,217
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2007
    I really don't think you will get precision accuracy from a bore sighter period, but I could be mistaken.
     
  6. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,779
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2005
    I think I will agree with britz, I could also be mistaken. Now, if I am, I would have to be for something similar to this: Watch the 3 small videos

     
  7. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,595
    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2007
    Bore sighters are rough zeroing tools that help make it easier to get the first shots on paper when actually zeroing. It is NOT a precison instument, in no sense of the word. That's why many people dispense with them and just go sight in at the range.

    That said, an optical type bore sighter, one with a grid, does have a good use for hunters. Once the scope is adjusted to point of impact, stick the bore sighter on and carefully note where the cross wires show on the grid. Then, prior to going on a hunt, recheck to see if the cross wires are still at that point. If they are, you can go hunting with more confidence. I have an old Bushnell "Pro" boresighter and keep a card with the zero points of all my rifles in the case with the tool. This pretty much eliminates any lazer bore sight tool, for me anyway.
     
  8. kstrick

    kstrick Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    140
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2008
    Thanks for the suggestion. No way would I ever rely on any bore sight system to get a final zero. I like to shoot to much to rely on a bore sight system. Good idea you had to mark a chart/grid with that particular guns zero. Like you said, and I agree...it's a confidence thing.
    Thanks Guys
    Happy Thanksgiving to everyone
    Ken
     
  9. mikebob

    mikebob Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    400
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2006
    + 1 boomtube. I have a grid bore sight tool. I also mark my zeros on cards that way if i drop my gun in the field i can pull it out of pack and check zero point. If off i can adjust back to that point, might not be exact but will get me close enough to finish hunt. As for bore sighting at scope mounting i have a lazer pointer that looks like a pencil that i put in the chamber and point into wall and line up cross hairs. My kids got it somewhere and was annoying the hell out of me with it so i took it away from them. Didnt take me long to figure out a use for it.
     
  10. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,779
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2005
    Nothing replaces shooting your rifle before the hunt to make sure it's on. Nevertheless, we do have to admit that there will be times that due to the circumstances you will not be able to do that and having another method to check it with is not a bad idea. ;)
    I've been there, more than once... Unfortunately, I do not own a boresighter!
     
  11. kstrick

    kstrick Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    140
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2008
    Didn't see my reply...
    I certainly would never depend on any bore sight equipment to zero in a scope...besides it's a lot more fun to go to the range. I was just looking for something to make sure a scope was not way off before heading out. Good idea you had to mark the grid with your scope as a way of documenting where the zero for that scope is.
    Happy Thanksgiving to everyone.
    Ken
     
  12. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,313
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004
    I agree with everyone they are not a precision instrument.

    But the main reason NOT to use them is that they can damage the crown.

    Some people clean from the breach to protect the crown and then turn
    around and stick a bore sighter in the muzzel.

    The crown is one of the things that can effect accuracy the most.

    J E CUSTOM