Bipod hop. How do i cure it?

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by CRNA, Mar 25, 2011.

  1. CRNA

    CRNA Well-Known Member

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    Well, I did some shooting last week with my 7mmRM at distances of 578 and 1033yds. Very, very fun. I did notice though, that my bipod (Harris S-series) would tend to slightly hop to the right after every shot. I was shooting prone, had a rear bag in use, and excellent cheek weld. Am I doing something wrong? Is there something that I could do better? The load I am using isn't all that hot IMO. I am pushing 168g SMKs at 2912FPS. I also have a McGowan SS 26" barrel. Thanks for the information.
     
  2. CRNA

    CRNA Well-Known Member

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    I have seen that before. I have to say that every time I got back behind the rifle to shoot I tried my best to keep this in mind and tried to get straight back behind the rifle. I would place the rifle (on bipod) on the ground pointing in the direction of the target, and would then get straight back there. Possibly I was not as straight as I thought, but I sure was making a conscious effort. Thanks for the reply.
     
  3. ICANHITHIMMAN

    ICANHITHIMMAN Well-Known Member

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    Ya thats a great article for sure. Just tell me one thing? Did it hurt your shooting at all?

    Jon
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2011
  4. CRNA

    CRNA Well-Known Member

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    No sir. For the first time of shooting at that distance, using my own hand loads, I thought I did very well. The only nagging problem was having to slightly move the rifle to get the sight picture in the scope to see the bullet impact. I would like to be able to shoot and maintain my sight picture in my scope. Hey, I can strive for perfection right?!! :D
     
  5. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Mar 25, 2011
  6. CRNA

    CRNA Well-Known Member

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    I think I saw that one, but like you, I can't find it. It's really not a big problem. Kinda glad to hear that I am not the only one with this issue.
     
  7. ICANHITHIMMAN

    ICANHITHIMMAN Well-Known Member

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    Lucky for me I fired a machine gun long before I owned my own rifle and learned recoil management. It is real simple to correct this issue your having.

    You have to "load the bipod" and dig your toes in to push her forward then "RELAX" deep breath and brake the shot.

    That said sometimes it doesn’t hurt to grab the bipod legs and drag them back and forth in the dirt to give them something to seat against either or try putting the bipod legs up against something like your pack.

    You picking up what I'm putting down?
     
  8. CRNA

    CRNA Well-Known Member

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    I'm reading you loud and clear. I actually tried that as well. I just didn't have a great deal of success with it. I think probably because we were shooting on an old moving mat (like the ones you get at U-haul for covering furniture), and it was sliding slightly in the grass.
     
  9. straightshooter

    straightshooter Well-Known Member

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    If you are using natural point of aim, where you place the but of the rifle has a lot to do with the direction the recoil will move. For example if you place the rifle on your shoulder muscle your whole body will have to go clockwise from straight behind the rifle (for a right handed shooter) to get a natural point of aim. If you move the rifle butt right in tight under your right cheek and bring your head straight down over the rifle you will get a natural point of aim more straight dehind the rifle. For my body that actually puts the rifle stock more on my chest than in the shoulder pocket you hear everyone talking about. It is hard to explain without diagrams, but try moving the rifle butt left and right on your shoulder while you are straight behind the rifle, and watch what it does to the recoil. It is important to have a good preshot routine so you set up consistently every time. Everyone is built different so you have to experiment a bit till you find what I like to call the sweet spot, but once you get that rifle recoiling straight back the groups will actually tighten up, plus it makes it easier to spot your own shots. This is why I like to do my practice with a rifle that has some recoil to it (a 308 Winchester is great).
     
  10. CRNA

    CRNA Well-Known Member

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    Straightshooter,
    Good points you make there. I will definitely give it a try next time I go to the range. Thanks for the input.

    Steve
     
  11. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    I'm the odd man out on this one.

    I get along with Harris type bipods like wolves get along with hound dogs........

    I recall that I could never shoot my dads Browning A5 shotgun as I heard all of the barrel and spring movement every shot.

    The springs on the folding bipods erk my nerves. Plus they will fold up on ya at the most opportune times. As in shoot at severe up angles and you have to break you position to get the range finder or something else.

    I build my own personal solid leg - solid mount bipot with the legs at a proper angle for solidness. When I want to level the rifle I cant the rifle to the high side and shove it back and forth. The feet do the digging.

    I always shoot with "some" shoulder pressure so I guess I'm loading the bipod. But not intentionally.

    I attempt to get straight behind the rifle but usually have my spotter correct my position. I naturally don't get it right.:rolleyes: But straight behind the rifle, for me, eliminates fliers.

    Oh, and put the bipod feet on the ground not the shooting mat. Don't know if its better or not as I always put the feet in the dirt.
     
  12. AZShooter

    AZShooter Well-Known Member

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    A tiny detail that has not been mentioned: Be sure the knurled nut on the second leg segment is tight. This prevents the feeet from rolling when you preload the bi-pod. Unfortunately some of the longer hunting style three segment ones don't have that feature but the two segment ones that most of us use for target shooting do.

    This article called bugholes from a bi-pod may help some too:

    Bugholes from Bipod
     
  13. ZSteinle

    ZSteinle Well-Known Member

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    understand what he is saying but would like to see no muzzle jump on a big 338, not a 308 or whatever that was with a silencer on it.