Bipod Bounce?

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by ownes408, Feb 13, 2012.

  1. ownes408

    ownes408 New Member

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    I'm new to shooting with a bipod and with recoil it bounces bad is there any trick to this in how to shoot with the bipod and not have bounce. I've even thought my rifle (7mm rem mag) just has to much recoil for a bipod. confused I'm new at it but I love learning new things or things that I just don't. I shoot just fine off of sand bags I get good groups. I just was wondering about new ways of shooting and learning about the bipod thing.:)
     
  2. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    If you are shooting on a bench try going to a prone position. Make sure the recoil pad is firmly on your shoulder to remove all slack and provide a slght forward pressure known as preloading the bipod. Also try to be as straight behind the rifle as possible.

    Jeff
     

  3. Dr. Vette

    Dr. Vette Well-Known Member

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    Broz gave me this tip last year, and I think it really helps. I found that the bipod doesn't move, the rifle doesn't really move much either, and perceived recoil is less.
     
  4. grit

    grit Well-Known Member

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    there's a video titled, "Bipods don't bounce" in the video section.
     
  5. Dr. Vette

    Dr. Vette Well-Known Member

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  6. Bullet bumper

    Bullet bumper Well-Known Member

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    If you are using a Harris bi-pod with notched legs and springs in the legs , don't shoot off the lowest setting as it will bounce on the springs , use the first notch position as the lowest setting. Also preloading a bi-pod means that you actually push the bi-pod forward to take out the play and any slack . Also when shooting from prone on the ground the legs will dig a hole from recoil and if you don't preload it forward each shot , under recoil the foot may jam up on the back edge of the hole . You may be allowing too much recoil movement rearwards . Get the kick pad on your shoulder properly and grip the gun firmly. Some stock configurations don't work well for both bench and prone positions unless they are adjustable . Recoil from the bench is harder to control because less of your body weight is actually behind the gun in a BR sitting position .
    That video might mean something if we knew what cartridges they used and what loads they used . I did not see any real heavy recoil present except on one gun. The first gun seemed to be shooting light loads of some kind . However they did control what ever recoil was there because they held onto the gun well. Good stock design and the heavy barrels also help a lot .
     
  7. ownes408

    ownes408 New Member

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    Thanks guys I'm going to finish loading the lot of ammo i'm on and go practice the stuff you guys and showed Plus I just love shooting in general its my greatest stress release :D
     
  8. grit

    grit Well-Known Member

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    Let us know how it goes. 90% of my shooting is done from a bipod. I shoot best off a bipod. When load testing, I'll lay down rather than shoot off the bench. It's what I'm most familiar with.

    I've seen odd recoil, in situations I expect it. Shooting off the hood, or any time the recoil is interfered with. One should remember the rifle needs to track straight, and set up so it can.
     
  9. Bravo 4

    Bravo 4 Well-Known Member

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    Most of my shooting in prone with bipod/rear bag. +1 on Broz's post.


    I've never heard this but it makes total sense. I have noticed I shoot better with my .338 when I have my bipod that doesn't have the notches on it. The other bipod I have for it is the short model that has notched legs and swivels. I knew it had something to do with the bipod, just couldn't pinpoint what it was. I kinda figured it was the swivel being torqued under recoil.