Best type of scale?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by RockyMtnMT, Aug 9, 2008.

  1. RockyMtnMT

    RockyMtnMT Official LRH Sponsor

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    Hi everyone,

    What do you all think about digital scales vs beam scales? Is one better than the other?

    Or is this like Chevy vs Ford?

    Thanks in advance for your input. I think I am going to have to get a new scale. So ideally, I want really cheap that works really good. lol

    Thanks, Steve
     
  2. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    Steve

    The place to cut cost is not the scale!!!!!

    A "good" beam scale is the place to start . Then add a good digital for speed (Weighing
    cases and bullets ETC.)

    Use the beam scale as the benchmark to verify all weights and to check the digital
    for accuracy from time to time.

    J E CUSTOM
     

  3. ss7mm

    ss7mm Writers Guild

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    This thread will give you some good reading. Link --> http://www.longrangehunting.com/content/product-reviews-4/rcbs-chargemaster-1500-review-168/

    You can also see some digital comparisons here. Link --> Digital Powder Dispensers -- RCBS ChargeMaster, Lyman 1200 DPS, PACT test review with accuracy, speed, warranty, reliability tests

    I've got a 10-10 scale as well as the RCBS Chargemaster. If I had to give up one it would be the 10-10. I dust off the beam every once in a while to check the digital but have never had any problems.

    I do agree however that you should have both and would say get the beam first and then the Chargemaster. By first I mean in the first line of the order and the Chargemaster in the second line of the order when you buy them.;);) Once you have the Chargemaster your only regret will be that you didn't buy it sooner.:)
     
  4. NesikaChad

    NesikaChad Well-Known Member

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    If you go and search around, you might find a laboratory grade balance from a company called Denver Instrument.


    Lemme tell ya, they make some cool azz stuff. You'll want to buy used and you'll need to be sitting down when the Visa card comes out.

    Not cheap.
     
  5. TCKev

    TCKev Well-Known Member

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    Another Vote For Chargemaster

    My girls bought me a RCBS CM for Christmas and I'll never go back to the 10-10


    Kevin
     
  6. bailey1474

    bailey1474 <strong>SPONSOR</strong>

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    I'd say to just buy the Chargemaster and don't look back. It would be nice to have balance scale around to check the chargemaster but most seem to throw very consistant charges.

    I can promise you you'll shoot a heckuva lot more if you have a chargemaster instead of balance scale!!!
     
  7. Roll-Yur-Own

    Roll-Yur-Own Well-Known Member

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    Chargemaster 1500 - Thats it!
     
  8. Forester

    Forester Well-Known Member

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    I like my balance beam scale for trickling rifle loads, but I use the digital to setup a powder dump for pistol rounds and to weigh bullets and cases.

    Those with the RCBS Chargemaster, have you checked a number of charges against a good balance beam? How did it do?
     
  9. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    One more comment on this question:

    I bought my Ohas 1010 beam scale in 1966 and it still is dead on .

    I also have owned a pact, RCBS Charge master ,a Lyman and a cabelas(Dont know
    who makes it) and they have all went south after a few years.

    I still use the electronic scales the most but rely on my beam scale as the final word
    On accuracy loads and to test the electronic scales.

    I have only known of 1 beam scale that went out of true and have have seen many
    electronic go bad.

    So I will continue to use both.

    Just my 2 cents
    J E CUSTOM
     
  10. RockyMtnMT

    RockyMtnMT Official LRH Sponsor

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    Thanks for all the input.

    I think I will replace my electonic w/ a beam this time.

    Steve
     
  11. johnnyk

    johnnyk Well-Known Member

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    Best type? Electronics are fast, mechanical are durable. Both are just as accurate as the weights (standards) used to calibrate them. I am a scale technician by trade. I've used Denver, Ohaus, Sartorious and several other top name commercial units. I have three electronic Ohaus scales setting in my reloading room now weghing dust! I bought a RCBS ChargeMaster 6 months ago and I will never go back to the small reloading balance beam scales. The freedom the ChargeMaster allows you is stupendious compared to the mechanical ones! Accurate? I'm shooing sub .5" groups with all my factory rifles! JohnnyK
     
  12. esshup

    esshup Well-Known Member

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    I started reloading shotgun, and purchased a 10-10. A while later, I had the opportunity to purchase a Dillon D-Terminator scale. That has worked flawlessly for the past 14 or so years. I recently purchased a CM 1500, and unless I break out the shotgun reloader, it will be used to check the CM 1500. As others have said, it's FAST!

    I usually start out with simple stuff, that's why I started out with a progressive shotgun reloading press (P-W).;)
     
  13. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    "...digital scales vs beam scales? Is one better than the other?"

    Not really, they are just different and each has some (small) advantages or the other.

    Beam scales are "better" for weighting powder charges while using a trickler. They follow the add powder accurately and immediately. Magnetically damped scales, as ALL modern ones are, don't swing much before they stop and, contrary to some beliefs, the magnets have NO impact on the scales accuracy or sensitivity. Beams shine when weighing a lot of things near the same weight, at least within +- .5 gr. Down side, to some extent, is that you must keep it dust and dirt free and be careful not to knock the beam weights out of position. And it's nice to have a scale up near eye level to make reading it easy, many try to use them on low bench tops and cuss the parallex effect, but that's their own fault!

    Digital scales are better for weighting items with variations that exceed +- .5 gr., such as when seperating cases or cast bullets. They are easy to read no matter where they are placed. Down side is they tend to drift calibration with warm-up and must be zeroed often. They are susceptible to power line changes. The weight detector is somewhat delicate and can be damaged if objects are dropped on it. Digitals also have a slight time lag in the read-out si they often "jump" a few tenths of a gr. at a time when trickling charges.

    Both types are very susceptible to air currents, all sensitive things are.

    My position is, buy a beam scale for weighting powder and get a digital if you weight select a LOT of brass or cast bullets.

    Digital powder dispensing systems are a whole different, and expensive, topic.
     
  14. BountyHunter

    BountyHunter Writers Guild

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    Buy a good used 10-10 on Ebay for around $40. You will like it and need it at times.

    I have had all the digitals and as said before they go south. Hopefully you can catch it before you shoot the loads.

    I have denver instruments now that measures to .o1 gr. With a Harrels measure I can throw, weigh and fine drop finals before the other $300 and under can drop a charge that might be on and might be off.

    BH