ballistic coefficient

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by casilva43, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. casilva43

    casilva43 Well-Known Member

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    How much emphasis do you place on ballistic coefficient. I was reading the .338 matchking has a BC of .768. Other bullets I am looking at have BC ranging from .550 to .575. How much of a difference will these BC affect long range capabilities? Will it be too small to notice?
     
  2. Scot E

    Scot E Well-Known Member

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    Depends on many things including what your definition of LR shooting is.

    Quick answer- For most big game cartridges it won't make much difference out to 5-600 yards. Beyond that, you better start to look more closely at what the BC will do.

    I am judging by your post count and the question that you may not have much experience with LR shooting and ballistics in general. I would highly encourage you to get real familiar with the LR calculator on this site.

    Long Range Hunting Ballistics Calculator

    It is a great tool to learn on, easy to use and you can compare various bullets or cartridges side by side to see the differences. A very useful learning tool.

    HTH,

    Scot E.
     

  3. casilva43

    casilva43 Well-Known Member

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    you are correct, I am new. Thanks for the info.
     
  4. Scot E

    Scot E Well-Known Member

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    No problem. Welcome to the forum and just dive in and start learning. There is a ton of info here!

    To make your searching for specific info easier don't forget about the Google search function at the top right of the page. It is a much better and more accurate way to search this site than the internal search function.

    Scot E.
     
  5. Long Time Long Ranger

    Long Time Long Ranger Well-Known Member

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    The best thing to do is plug in different bullets at the velocity and range you plan on shooting them. Then make a decision. Any bullet with a .55+ bc works well to 800+ yards if the velocity is adequate. I have taken animals to beyond 1000 yards with that bc. I guess what I keep trying to tell you it is the whole package of weight/type rifle, cartridge, and range you intend to do most your shooting. There is no definitive answer to meet all demands. That is why they make and people shoot a bunch of different stuff.
     
  6. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    My opinion is what ever a low BC bullet will do, a high BC bullet will do also but will do it with more energy and to longer distances and will carry that energy with it. This is why I shoot large bullets with high BC's, I am covered at all distances.

    Jeff
     
  7. Long Time Long Ranger

    Long Time Long Ranger Well-Known Member

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    Broz, that is usually correct but the problem is with a light rifle 27" barrel he is talking about the 300 grainers will knock the snot out of him. There are also the specialty bullets that have the bc of the 300 grainers but 40+ grains lighter and can be driven 300 fps faster with the same bc. So a guy really needs to look around and make sure his choice is the best for him.
     
  8. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    I think it is always the case as far as what I stated. I just read the OP's first post again and he was asking about BC's and affect it would have with Long Range capabilities.

    We built a rum with a 26" sendero contour, and the light McMillan mountain hunter stock. With the JP Tac compensator brake it was easy to shoot with very managable recoil with 300's. The Sucker shot very well for a light rifle too. I was testing it up at Long Shot Percision with Joe Starnes and "SHRTSHTR" from this site. I sent one to the 14" wide target at 1162 yards for a center mass hit, I watched the bullet splash, then jacked another in and sent it for two hits in 4". I was amazed at the light recoil and the accuracy of this rifle. Easy to spot hits. "Shrtshtr" will vouch for the wind that day, it was howling. I was very glad to have a high BC bullet. So what .338 260 gr bullet has a G1 BC of .768 over .800 ? I was not aware of any.

    Thanks
    Jeff
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2012
  9. Long Time Long Ranger

    Long Time Long Ranger Well-Known Member

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    I was talking about his other post mentioning a light carry gun 27" barrel. I have not shot a light rifle with the 300 grainers that didn't whack pretty hard. The 260 grain cutting edge bullet is right at .76 bc according to drop tests. There are always other options depending on the rifle and what you want to accomplish with it.
     
  10. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    Well, you have some very fast tubes too. I know you get better velocity than I can form mine. Those higher velocities really make the lighter bullets look good as far as drops and drift on a computer program. But I can't seem to get my rifles to those velocities. One thing I know you already know, but needs to be mentioned is the fact that those lighter faster muzzle velocity bullets are always caught by the heavier bullets that start slower, and always finish faster. It's just a matter of when, but it always happens as a lighter bullet slows at a much faster rate. Also at long range there is no way the 260 gr can deliver the ft lbs of energy a 300 can, especially when it slows to below the speed the 300 will arrive at.

    Wonder why CE does not post the actual numbers on their website? They state " Real World BC of .700 " for the .252's. And that is from a 3100 MV and actual drops out to 1500 yards I think?? I didnt see a 260? Did I miss it? You have to agree that .700 or even .760 will not buck wind like the .820 BC of the Berger OTM.

    Don, I wish you would try one of those JP brakes, they are amazing and if for some reason you didn't like it I woud buy it from you.

    Jeff
     
  11. Scot E

    Scot E Well-Known Member

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    Cartridge does make a differnce as well. I remember last fall LTLR and I were working up numbers on a 333-06 AI and the heavier bullets with the best BC's didn't perform as well as the lighter to mid range bullets because the BC wasn't enough to make up for the extra velocity the lighter bullets could run at.

    That is why I think it would do the OP well to spend some time running numbers with a ballistic program.

    Scot E.
     
  12. Long Time Long Ranger

    Long Time Long Ranger Well-Known Member

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    Scott, that is a good point. You always want to match your bullet to the best effective range of your rifle

    Broz, I may try one of those brakes if they are that good. I talked to a guy at the shot show about doing a couple brakes for me. I have 2-3 rifles that need a brake now. I agree for your purpose the big heavy high bc bullets are best for what you do going out to a mile. That is what I always shot out that far. I have been shooting the 300 smk since before they came out and have not tried the new bergers with the .8+ bc. The 260 CE bullet has about the same bc as the 300 smk so it makes more sense at 250 fps faster. That bullet has plenty of energy to kill anything at any range.

    My Lapua's are light carry rifles for 1000 yard and closer primarily. Within that distance I am doing better with the 225 grain .64 bc at around 3250-3300 fps. The 300 grainer doesn't beat it in wind until past there and I am way flatter for using my ballistic reticles quickly without turning clicks. With the 300 I must turn clicks because of the severe drop. In Alaska tundra and some antelope country my puny Lieca will not get a range many times and I must do that with reticles which is not dead on but close enough with the right set up. The extra velocity puts me in the kill zone further to allow me to make the hits. When I get a nice rangefinder like yours and I plan to soon then my parameters change because I can't outshoot my rangefinder. Now I can easily outshoot my rangefinder so I shoot the 225 grain that is best for me ballistically within the limitations of my equipment.

    That 252 CE bullet I shoot is .72 bc. The 260 grain .76 is new and was at the shot show. I have not shot it but ordered some. I talked to them at the show and they are getting bc's off actual drops to extended ranges and the bullets I have tested were right in there with what they got. The C21 180 grain bullet is actually higher at .6 out of my 300 RUM at 3450-3475 fps. The 225 grain D62 bullet actually hit .65's out of my 338-378 wby at over 3500 fps with 127.5-128 grains of H-870. I since dropped that to 3450-3475 fps with 125.5-126 grains and save $3 brass. I was putting three shot groups through an elk silhouette target at 1500 yards with the 225 and 252 this summer. I just found these bullets last year and shot them quite a bit over the summer. They are the real deal. They are a small company just getting started but the bullets are very good.
     
  13. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    Broz, are you talking about them ugly looking, bulky brakes that look like barbecue cover?
    LOL

    [​IMG]

    When I saw them I could right away see why they'd be so effective, but don't they get in
    the way when hunting?

    OR THIS ONE?

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    Eaglet, the second one. NOt the Howitzer thing. :D I just really like these brakes. I am suprised more people are not using them already. Plus I think they look good too.