Archery Mule Deer?

Discussion in 'How To Hunt Big Game' started by bowtechboss177, Apr 19, 2014.

  1. bowtechboss177

    bowtechboss177 Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys I need some advice on hunting muleys with my bow this year. The area I'm hunting is very dry and a high desert but holds some big bucks. I'm a youth hunter so I need some advice on tactics and how to sneak up on bucks. Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. nuevoeph

    nuevoeph Member

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    Welcome to the forum. You'll find most guys here hunt rifle so I hope you get some feedback but I wouldn't expect a bunch of good archery tactics.

    Which unit are you going to be hunting? Just curious as I'm in NM too, but hopefully hunting rifle or ML in unit 17 or around there.

    My suggestion is to find a local, neighbor, coworker who would give you advice. Nothing beats talking in person. Plus they may be able to give you scouting support, too.
     

  3. bowtechboss177

    bowtechboss177 Well-Known Member

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    Mainly reservation hunting and hopefully 2c or 2b bow hunt.
     
  4. wyowinchester

    wyowinchester Well-Known Member

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    Learn to spot from a distance. Good optics are a must. Let them bed.
    Examine the terrain, and get good land marks. Hills, rocks, and brush look different when you see them from a new angle. Use it to your advantage.
    Decide if it's worth trying. Sometimes you should pass on a good deer because he is in a spot where you'll spook him, then he'll be harder to find.
    Check the wind.
    Expect them to move after you leave sight of them.
    Slow down
    Recheck wind and slow down again.
    Use your optics as you start to crest hill tops, did I mention slow down.
    Some people remove their boots the last 100yds or so. Get a heavy pair of socks to stock in
    SLOW DOWN
    Patients is the key to closing the gap. Check the wind.
    After you get in bow range you might have to sit and wait for some time so don't forget to get a little comfortable when you stop.

    Just a few tips, there are more, but sometimes experience is a good teacher.
     
  5. Bowhunter7

    Bowhunter7 Active Member

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    I shot a 260 inch typical in 2b at 136 yards with my bow it was a real trophy
     
  6. Speedygoss

    Speedygoss Well-Known Member

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    Good Glass, good tripod, good patience and some good sneaky feet.
     
  7. Tulie

    Tulie Well-Known Member

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    2C or 2B will be tough no matter what but my suggestion is glass, glass, glass and oh yeah, keep looking more. 2C is amazing country and I love it in there but it's tough and epecially with a bow. Get up high as you can on the ridge and watch the draws coming up and down out of the ridge. Watch the sage flats in the morning and late evening and during the day look through the tops of the ridge in the finger draws that hold any trees. It will be hot so they will want water and shade. Good luck, if you get into C it will be amazing. B is another story, same thing for the high up and watching but some of that country is dog hair thick. Again, I'd do the same thing, watch the sage flats. There are some very large bucks in each area.
     
  8. bowtechboss177

    bowtechboss177 Well-Known Member

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    Didn't draw a state tag so no 2c or 2b but I am guaranteed to draw a Navajo Reservation elk and deer bow hunt... not many deer so hopefully I'll get lucky.:rolleyes:
     
  9. MHO

    MHO Well-Known Member

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    wyowinchester could not have said it better. And remember dont force anything, be patient. Dont let the size of the buck determine if your going to try a stalk but the terrain and wind in between you. If you dont force things he will be there with hopefully better conditions / terrain the following day.
     
  10. dfanonymous

    dfanonymous Well-Known Member

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    look up stalking. I can't help you finding deer or how to stalk on a online forum...but as far as the tactics...i saw someone post something about a spotter and a patience...and that is correct.
    The technique common in western hunting high country is spot and stalk. Even though i can pop the pimple off a nats ass @ 1300 yards, i still prefer bow hunting to rifles, it can have quite the rush. more important, it takes more discipline in my opinion and its a little hard to do if you're not good spotting deer, which is half the battle. Look at maps, look for northern slopes and check them out from afar with good glass. Be patient and look for bedding buck.
    Next part of the battle is the 40%, getting within range without spooking the deer. That involves being mindful of wind, using micro terrain to conceal movement, staying out of the skyline, not moving to slow, more important not moving to fast, and being very quite in your movement. the 10% is making your shot. Dont assume with a bow, range everything. There are some examples on web of stalking, and some ideas...best way is to use some of those ideas and try it...and when you mess up, figure out why and try again. I've low crawled, walked around several hills to get a top side shot, ive taken off shoes, and even have walked straight up within range...it could depend, and personally in some situations some luck is involved, though i would rely on it. Some guys pass on stalks if they dont want to risk disturbing the deer. Once muleys blow, they rarely come back to the same place. If you are hunting with another person, sometimes you can do a drive as a back up technique in the event you mess up the stock. Again, it can get really situational. Just focus on spotting and stalking first, id say!
     
  11. Country Bumpkin

    Country Bumpkin Well-Known Member

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    I think Wyowinchester nailed it. Slow down. I have killed a few archery bucks with spot and stalk, even some back east where the dry leaves make stealth nearly impossible.

    My advice:

    Be the stone - your movements inside the last 150 yards should be at a stones pace. Ideally the deer shouldn't be able to detect your movements because you are moving so slow. This takes incredible concentration and balance.

    Stay low - nothing screams "Human" like the shape of a standing monkey. Come up with a sling system so that you can put your bow on your back without it falling off and crawl . . . on your belly.

    Don't let frustration win - we have all blown stalks, you won't be the greatest archer the world has ever seen in year 1. Keep at it and try to analyze what you did wrong after every stalk. Learn from your mistakes and don't repeat them.

    Beware the Does - it's usually not the buck you are after that will detect you and bolt, it will be one of the other bucks or does that he's bedded with that you didn't see. We are predators, predators tend to have a lazer focus on their target and our minds can't handle a lot of data besides what we gather in relation to our target (we don't see the doe that's 15 yards in front of our buck that's bedded behind a sage). As was mentioned previously, this is is where really good glass comes into play. Take an extra 10 minutes to look for ears, legs, tails. You should also use this time to try and get a feel for which direction the thermals are playing near your buck.

    Good luck. Post photos.