Antelope Tenderloin

Discussion in 'Cooks' Corner' started by jpruitt, Oct 19, 2008.

  1. jpruitt

    jpruitt Active Member

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    Can anyone tell me how to prepare the tenderloin before cooking and how to cook it. This is my first antelope and don't have a clue. Thanks in advance for any help.
    Jim
     
  2. sharpshooterbr

    sharpshooterbr Well-Known Member

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    Congratulations on your first antelope. While preparing the meat, be sure to cut all of the "striffen" off of the outside of the tenderloin. Then butterfly cut the tenderloin into steak size pieces. Next, I thoroughly rinse the meat under cold water. I then like to take a mixture of flour, seasoning salt, red pepper, black pepper and a touch of chili powder in a bowl. In a separate bowl have a couple of eggs. Take each steak and dip it into the egg, then into the flour mix, and then back into the egg again. This will ensure the breading will stay on the meat during cooking. I like to use an electric skillet with enough vegetable oil to cover the bottom. Turn it up to about medium heat and cook your steaks until they turn a golden brown on the outside. This is a quick fix, and is quite tasty.
     

  3. jpruitt

    jpruitt Active Member

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    :DSharpshooterbr,

    To my surprise,We done everything except the red pepper, black pepper and the chili powder. I am trying to think what the chili powder is going to do to the taste?????. Looking forward to trying it soon!!!!! Thanks and I will let you know how well it turns out. [​IMG]

    Jim
     
  4. dogdinger

    dogdinger Writers Guild

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    my old standby recipe for tenderloin is to wrap in bacon and grill it. i normally would marinate it in whatever you prefer....plain old spicey italian dressing works great.....then wrap and pin with bacon.....wrap in alum foil ....cook on low heat on grill.......dont over-cook it.....medium rare is just right...mm mm good...AJ
     
  5. trebark

    trebark Well-Known Member

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    Personally, I prefer grilled tenderloin....

    Marinade meat in marinade of your choice. I find that 24 hours in the marinade is great.

    Light you grill and get it to about 450 or 500 degrees. Put your tenderloin on the grill and close the cover. After about five minutes, open grill and turn the meat over and pour any left-over marinade you have on the meat. Close the cover. Let cook for about five minutes. If you like rare meat, it's done. If you like medium rare, turn the grill down and let cook for another five minutes or so. Then take the meat off and tent it in foil for about ten minutes. Slice thin and serve..mmmmm.
     
  6. rm76

    rm76 Well-Known Member

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    jpruit - are you talking about the tenderloin or backstap (loin)? These are different although the same recipes can apply to both -- but cooking time may be different. The tenderloin on an antelope is not very big and will only feed 2 people -- but only if you serve it sparingly. The tenderloin (fillet migon cut in beef) is found on the inside of the gut cavity. The backstap or loins are found ofcourse on the outside of the carcass on each side of the backbone.

    My favorite recipe for the tenderloin is simply to saute both tenderloin strips (whole and unseasoned) in a generous amount of butter (real butter). Lightly brown on all sides on medium heat, but do not overcook. This is best if the meat is still pink on the inside when sliced. Add about 1/3 to 1/2 cup of Jack Danniel whiskey (or any good bourbon). Then let simmer for a few minutes. Remove the tenderloin strips and slice at an angle, place slices back into skillet to ensure coating of the liquid on all surfaces of the cutlets and then season (salt/pepper) and serve immediately with plenty of juice. Dont worry about the alcohol -- it all cooks off quickly. This recipe also works well for backstap but I like to first cut the backstap into cutlets or steaks before cooking. Be sure to remove as much of the connective tissue as possible from the backstap before cooking though. Enjoy!
     
  7. cornstalker

    cornstalker Well-Known Member

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    Antelope tenderloins are so small and mushy that I just grind 'em.

    A quick yet delicious way to cook the backstraps (trimmed of course) is to soak the steaks in a mixture of heavy table cream and whipped egg, then dredge in Progresso Italian Style breadcrumbs and fry just like sharpshooterbr said. I liven mine up with a little cayenne powder as well.
     
  8. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    That JD had best be the Green Label stuff. If I remember right the Black Label is the stuff for sippin';)

    In a fairly hot skillet w/only a little oil, I just quickly fry 'em. Outside is pretty well seared/sealed and center is pinkish. Seasoned only w/Salt and pepper.

    The tenderloin and back strap cut with the bone in is pretty much a pork chop lookin thing. I like to clean the bones.;)

    Steaks get a full treatment of Tony's or a heavy dose of garlic powder, red, black and white pepper. Its some kinda good.......
     
  9. rm76

    rm76 Well-Known Member

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    That mushyness is called tenderness -- thus the name tenderloin! Most tender cut on the whole animal. Small, yes -- but excellent eating! But you have to keep the urine (and fecal matter ofcourse) off of it.
     
  10. cornstalker

    cornstalker Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for clearing that up. I always wondered about that!

    They are mushy and look half bloodshot. I don't like 'em. The backstraps and round steaks are tender enough to cut with a fork and I like them just fine.

    Just the same, I hope the original question was answered. There are some good recipes on here
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2008
  11. jpruitt

    jpruitt Active Member

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    Man, you'all have got me in a heck of a mess with all these great recipes.[​IMG] Do you know how many times I am going to need to visit Wyoming to get enough antelope to try all these?????[​IMG]. Just something that I will have to cope with I guess. Ha Ha. Better start planning for next year. Please keep the recipes comming because they more than likely work on deer also.[​IMG] Till next time. Jim