Another annealing hot to question

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by bkondeff, Apr 1, 2013.

  1. bkondeff

    bkondeff Well-Known Member

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    So I realize I need to anneal my 7mm brass.

    I have read too many posts on the subject, which has given me analysis paralysis.

    What is the idiot proof way of doing this, especially for my 7mm Mag?

    I guess if I had to try it tonight I would fill a big baking pan with about 1" of water, stand up my brass, necks up, with plenty of space, then heat the necks with a torch while in a dark room just until they start to glow, then knock them over into the water. Do 1 at a time and pay attention.
     
  2. jsthntn247

    jsthntn247 Well-Known Member

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    Get you a spark plug socket that allows the shoulder and neck to stick out of the top. Put it in a drill and spin it over a torch. You can tell when they are annealed. Get a couple of pieces and practice first. 7 mag brass should take 8-10 seconds and no longer. Thick rws 300 win brass takes 11 Mississippi's.
     

  3. Joe King

    Joe King Well-Known Member

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    There is no idiot proof way to anneal brass, some are definitely better though. An annealing machine is ideal but if that's not in the cards right now, then doing it by hand can be done. Do a search on the topic and you'll find references to temp sticks that go a long way to help you learn to judge your heat applied. Myself I hold the case in my fingers and rotate the mouth over the flame, you will not over heat the case body or head this way as you drop it into a pan of water, because it gets to warm to hold onto.
     
  4. hdbiker1

    hdbiker1 Member

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    Before I partnered up on a Giraud annealer, I used a deep well socket on a drill method. Get some 750 degree tempilaq and coat the inside of the neck and let it dry. Apply heat while spinning and start counting until all the tempilaq turns into a liquid, your done. Remember the count and use it for the rest of your brass. The count should be the same unless you change the distance to the flame, brass headstamp or spinning speed.
     
  5. bkondeff

    bkondeff Well-Known Member

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    First I need to know how to spell, "how to" instead of "hot to".

    Thanks for the reminder on the sticks. I'm guessing that is the best way to get a feel for the right temp. I have heard of and do think the hot finger method may work , assuming I can handle the heat long enough to do it righ.
     
  6. Aldon

    Aldon Well-Known Member

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    I believe annealing is both temperature and time dependent.

    While the finger method may work, I will note that the brass that comes off the Giraud is is way too hot for my tolerance.

    Use 750 tempilaque to guage the correct temp on the neck. I would also use 450 tempilaque on the base if your not using the hold in your finger method to assure you do not anneal the case head and bottom area of the brass. I am assuming your fingers will want to let go before you hit that point.

    I seem to remember you want to have the neck at heat for ~ 6 seconds but that is a fuzzy number and you need someone to verify if accurate.
     
  7. Snowfighter

    Snowfighter Well-Known Member

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    Everyone has their own way I suppose. Here's mine.
    I use 750 tempilaq. Like to see the exact temperature change.
    I spin cases with a drill at a moderate speed. I prefer this because it heats evenly.
    I use a hole saw to hold the case. One can be found very close to the size to hold a case without it rattling around. And can be had for cheap. Cut the teeth off obviously and debur.
    I choose not to quench in water. Don't have a good reason for that.
    Happy loading.