Annealing with lead - process?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by tlk, Mar 8, 2010.

  1. tlk

    tlk Well-Known Member

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    Can someone give me the proper process on annealing brass with molten lead? Pros & cons would be great as well.

    Thanks
     
  2. mo

    mo Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Mar 8, 2010

  3. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

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    I remember reading recently that a concern was expressed about lead fumes and of coarse the obvious burns.
     
  4. bassin93

    bassin93 Well-Known Member

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    I anneal pretty much the way Buffalo Bob does, except I just dump the cases out onto a folded towel and not into water so I can continue my case prep as soon as they cool and not several days later. Also I use a torch that apparently dosen't get quite as hot as his, I hold mine in the flame for a count of 6 and never let them get as bright as they were in his video just a very dull red. I anneal my black powder cases for my 45-90 after every third firing, then tumble and dry in an oven on a cookie sheet that has been preheated to 250 then turned off. My black powder brass I tumble in a rotory tumbler with ceramic media which you use with water. best stuff youll ever use.
     
  5. Forester

    Forester Well-Known Member

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    Keep the lead at a sane temp, say below 800, and there will be no lead fumes. Burns are a risk in any sort of annealing, if you are using lead though just make sure you have a stable workbench and dont drop any liquid in the pot...that can get ugly fast.
     
  6. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

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    Below 800, good tip for those that use the lead method. Thanks
     
  7. tlk

    tlk Well-Known Member

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    I have looked - and looked - for a good process on how to do this and I cannot find it. Have found were some folks use their fingers for and dip them in, but no specific times, etc.

    Seems to me that if you are able to control the temp you should be able to identify how long it needs to be in there, how deep you need to plunge it in, etc. You know, all the details that matter.

    Anyone got access to this kind of info?


    Thanks
     
  8. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    I think that goes to show how many people are annealing with lead. Not many.
     
  9. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

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    How do you avoid the lead adhering to the brass case? Is there some trick to it?
     
  10. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    The lead sticks if the brass isn't clean and up to temp, once the brass is up to temp then it just flows of cause the brass is hot enough to melt the lead.
    I haven't played with it much, my dad trying it and didn't continue. The next time he fires up the casting pot I was going to give it a try. I know hot lead is not something to be taken lightly and any water at all is an absalutely BAD!
     
  11. distantfoe

    distantfoe Well-Known Member

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    The lead annealing process seems to be the most consistent without spend $$$ for an annealing machine. Spinning a case while holding a case to the flame until it turns a certain color or to a certain "count" can't be consistent.

    Lead at a certain temperature, i.e. ~800deg (?), dipping to precisely the same spot for a fairly controlable time is getting closer to being reproducible. At least we can tell how hot the lead is and can control it. A torch is hardly controllable and severly dependant on the how "consistent" the operator is. i.e. how far from torch is the case, did we leave the case on for that last .5seconds that actually ruined it, was the case the precise "color" it should be before removing from the flame etc.
     
  12. okey

    okey New Member

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    I am glad this thread was started. After the last thread on annealing Mikecr said he used lead.

    I was hoping he would join in and save me a lot of time experimenting .

    Okey
     
  13. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

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    bigngreen, when you say once the brass is up to temp, do you mean before it goes in the lead or putting the brass into the lead and once it gets up to temp in the lead...then the lead rolls off?
     
  14. RockyMtnMT

    RockyMtnMT Official LRH Sponsor

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    I don't want to hijack this thread but does anyone know what process Lapua uses to anneal their brass?

    Steve