Annealing Question?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by samson, Mar 19, 2008.

  1. samson

    samson Well-Known Member

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    I recently purchased some new 300 wm cases (NORMA) and am about to anneal them. I have never done this before but bought an annealing kit and thought id give it a try. On the new cases, do I have to size them prior to the annealing process, or can I anneal them then size them?
     
  2. James Jones

    James Jones Well-Known Member

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    STOP !!!!


    Norma and Lapua both anneal their brass , their is no need to do this first , after 3-5 reloads you might notice that the brass seems kinda springy thats when its time to anneal it.

    Annealing bras makes it soft again so that the die can squeeze it back to shape and it will stay their other wise it gets work hardened from the repeated reloading process and the necks will spring back open after it goes through the die and not hold the bullets as well or give even neck tension from case to case
     

  3. JeffVN

    JeffVN Well-Known Member

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    +1 if the brass is new, there is no need to anneal it at this point. I anneal my 7WSM Brass after every 4 loadings, as that is when I started to notice uneven neck tension and release -as trasnlated to wider velocity spreads ans verticle at 1,000 yards.

    I would expect that you can go 3-5 loadings on your brass before the same starts to happen to you (depending upon how hard you push the load of course).

    JeffVN
     
  4. samson

    samson Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for the quick response. I thought they did, but didnt notice any color changes on the necks.
     
  5. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    ALL makers anneal after case forming, they also tumble to remove the discoloraton. Well, except for military cases because they don't have to be concerned about what the consumer thinks.

    Never heat the necks to a visible glow, that's much too hot and will damage the brass. Of course the dead soft necks will seem to last forever if you do!