Annealing Accuracy Increase???

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Arbogb06, Apr 18, 2013.

  1. Arbogb06

    Arbogb06 Well-Known Member

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    I currently reload my own round for my .338 lapua. I am getting good results with my current load and am getting ready to load my brass for the 3rd time. A few questions I had about annealing brass is how often should you do it? I see some threads where guys use drills and basically hold it in heir hand.

    This is the annealing machine I have in mind and there is currently a group buy on them on here, but want to ensure this is money well spent.

    New Case Neck Annealing Machine


    The above annealing machine looks like it would be the most precise and accurate but at $500.00 that is steep. What are the accuracy increases one can realistically achieve if they anneal their brass often? At what ayardage would these accuarcy increases shwo themselves on paper? I know the main purpose is to extend the life of the brass but am wondering if you can see the accuracy gains on paper and at what range do these gains start to become notcieable?

    Thanks,

    Brandon
     
  2. Korhil78

    Korhil78 Well-Known Member

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    It's not that you are really going to get an accuracy increase from annealing you brass. What is really happening is that the annealing process will help you maintain the good accuracy that you have always had with your newer brass.

    When you fire and resize your brass, it work hardens the case neck. When the case neck starts to harden, it will start to give you inconsistent neck tension on the bullet. That is what causes you to have a drop in accuracy. When you anneal your brass, it softens the neck back up and you can get consistent neck tension.

    Also, buying a case annealer will basically pay for itself after a while. The annealer can double (sometimes more than double) the life of your brass. That really saves you a lot of money especially when you are using expensive brass like 338 Lapua brass.

    I have the annealing machine that you are talking about and it is awesome. Easy to use and works great.
     

  3. Arbogb06

    Arbogb06 Well-Known Member

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    Korhil 78,

    Thanks for the response. I might go ahead and order one of these while they are at a discount. All these reloading components are adding up to one expensive arse hobby.
     
  4. Arbogb06

    Arbogb06 Well-Known Member

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    Anyone have any experience with the Giraud Annealer?
     
  5. Gene

    Gene Well-Known Member

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    I hand anneal with a cordless drill and propane torch about every 3-4 loadings. It will help maintain consistent neck tension. But I shoot with guys who never anneal and they usually shoot very well. Go figure.
     
  6. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    I use the Bench Source and it is an excellent product that enables you to get very high precision in the annealing process. I haven't seen a difference in accuracy when measured at 100-200 yards, but it I have found that case life can be increased, and my ES seems to be maintained. Keeping ES as low as possible would give more consistent accuracy over the life of the case at extended ranges. As you continue to fire and resize the brass the neck area becomes work hardened and in time can become brittle and crack, as well as produce an inconsistent grip on the bullet. This inconsistency can many times be felt when seating your bullets. I can get 10+ reloads with my 6.5 x284, 308, and 300WM by annealing.
     
  7. gamehawker

    gamehawker Well-Known Member

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    I have some Winchester 7mm STW nickel plated brass.

    Does annealing work on nickel plated brass?
     
  8. Reloader222

    Reloader222 Well-Known Member

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    I have the same question. I had once fired cases and sized them. I had used Redding Wax, but the sizing was extremely difficult. The 50% of the cases had dents on the side of the case just beneath the shoulder. This is an indication for me of resistence to the resizing process. This is not the same as when you put too much lube on the shoulder and it dents the shoulder - this is on the side of the case just below the shoulder. Had read on forums that it is not realy worth while to use these cases and that it could damage the die sets. However, it is difficult for me to throw away any cases and I have thought of just buying another die set for these cases since I do no want to mess up my Redding set.
     
  9. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    I have heard differing views on annealing nickel cases. I have never tried them for that reason. Mt experience with both pistol and rifle cases that are nickle plated has been 1/3 to 1/2 the life if rads. Adds before thy rack at the neck. I try to avoid them them.
     
  10. coyotemaster

    coyotemaster Active Member

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    I also firmly believe that annealing regularly increases accuracy due to consistent neck tension. I anneal after each loading and find it a simple process for all the benefits provided. I use a small propane torch and heat just until the color change occurs at the shoulder.
     
  11. X-man

    X-man Well-Known Member

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    Yes, no problem.
     
  12. Rocky Mountain

    Rocky Mountain Well-Known Member

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    Some good advise there over annealing is one of the problems that catches most people out.