Angle Shooting - Correcting For The Effects Of Gravity by Ward Brien

Discussion in 'Technical Articles - Discussion' started by Len Backus, Mar 27, 2008.

  1. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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  2. Froggy

    Froggy Active Member

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    Angle Cosign Indicator

    I purchased one of your 1st generation Cosign Indicators, I can honestly say that it has improved my up and down hill game 100%.

    I use XBAll ballistic software with my Cosign Indicator, it works great, 1st hits everytime, I'm currenty shooting varmits with my tactical 6.5-284.

    I recieved an e mail from Long Range Hunting and saw your article, I would like to personally thank you for a wonderful piece equipment, I love how simple it is to use and cool it looks, people always ask me what it is.....lol

    Anyway I just wanted to thank you personally

    Steve/Froggy
     

  3. tillroot1

    tillroot1 Well-Known Member

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    some friends and myself took Ward's basic long range training for a weekend, his abilities,equipment, and training are second to none. I have the ACI on my .300 Win Mag that has assisted me more than once. Ron Tilley
     
  4. CADDIE5

    CADDIE5 Active Member

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    My 308win medium range rifle has a 25 moa picantanny long range
    > scope base. I have a leupold 6.5x25 target scope on it. The receiver
    > is cyroed and the barrel is 26 inch 1-12 twist heavy contour in a hs
    > precision stock with adj. cheekpiece. For the aci indicator do I still
    > parallel the aci to the bolt rail reference? Or do I set the aci level
    > to the barrel axis? I have the leupold rxb binocular laser rangefinder
    > with slope adjustment- but it is always worth checking the rifle’s aim
    > versus looking through binoculars. I know the importance of natural
    > point of aim as a highpower rifle competitor. I have a bsquare level
    > on the picantanny rail so that I don’t introduce cant to the rifle.
    > I’m hoping to pull an Oregon antelope tag this year with my retired
    > hunting friend that lives in Bend. I’ll be loading up some barnes ttsx
    > 130 grain bullets for the hunt. What nightforce scope and reticle do
    > you recommend for long range shooting—I don’t like busy reticles. My
    > hunting buddy shoots 1000yd. matches in Oregon and does very well.
     
  5. WWB

    WWB <b>SPONSOR</b>

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    Wow!

    Froggy, Tillroot1, How are you guys doing? It is GREAT to hear from you and I am surprised.
    In fact, I hope that you guys will come to Colorado and visit, it would be great to see you.

    Caddie5: The ACI needs to be level with the bore of the barrel to work as intended.
    I am not familiar with the Leupold line of binoculars, however if they have an angle indicator in it similar to the Leica Vector (now Vectronix) it should do that well. However, if it is delivering the distance to target based on the "Rifleman" method, it can cause you to miss your target as much as 8 moa in comparison to utilizing Ballistic Targeting software, such as Night Force's / Exbal.

    Reticles and power for Long Range Shooting is based on both practicality and personal preferences. In a hunting scenario either a mil-dot or moa reticle works very well. I strongly suggest that the reticle that you choose will subtend with the click value of the turrets. In other words, if you choose a moa reticle, then the click value of the turrets should be in moa. If the reticle is in milliradian, then the click value of the turrets should be in 1/10 mil's.

    The mil-dot (milliradian) reticles work best for military usage and while working in the metric system. It is much easier to use and much faster to range with than anything else because one mil-dot measures 10 centimeters at 100 meters, 20 at 200m, 30 at 300m etc... and 100 centimeters at 100 meters. The measurement form the hips to the top of a mans head equals approximately 1 meter (100 centimeters) So if the hips to the top of head fits within one mil-dot, the adversaray is 1000 meters out, if he fits within 2 mil-dots, he is 500 meters out, 3 mil-dots = 333 meters out, 4 = 250 and 5 = 125.

    Knowing this with memorized holds, as well as having 26 inches (66 centimeters) of target, is very fast.

    The one element that is not addressed with "holding over" is that it is quite accurate when shooting flat out to 600 yards. However, you are moving your eye off of the ocular center of the glass, which can cause the bullet to impact slightly higher than intended.
     
  6. Buffalobob

    Buffalobob Writers Guild

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    Froggy

    I would like to thank you for your much read and re-read article on how to shoot with a bipod. I read it about every six months and learn something new each time.

    I assume you are the original and one and only "Froggy".

    Thanks

    Jim
     
  7. jmden

    jmden Well-Known Member

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    BB,

    Would you mind telling me(us) where this article can be located?

    Thanks!
     
  8. ss7mm

    ss7mm Writers Guild

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    Don't know if BB is still around but I think this is the one he is talking about.
    Bugholes from Bipod
     
  9. WWB

    WWB <b>SPONSOR</b>

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    Froggy

    Froggy is an old and dear friend of mine. He has an interesting background which I'm not a liberty to go into. However, he is a Shooter, both with firearms and a camera. If you are interested, you can view his imagery at the following link:

    Steve Agrella Photography- powered by SmugMug
     
  10. Ernie

    Ernie SPONSOR

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    I have 2 of Ward's ACI's on my specialty handguns and they have always been spot-on. I also use Exbal loaded in a pocket PC for field use.
    Don't have one of his C-Level's yet:eek: though-Need to put that on the to-buy-list.

    Thanks for making practical stuff for us.
     
  11. Bryan M

    Bryan M New Member

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    Angle Cosine Indicator

    I've used Ward's Angle Cosine Indicators for 3 years now, own his C-Level and have also taken his long range shooting class in 2007. The Cosine Indicator, when combined with a ballistic program, such as Exbal Software, is an invaluable tool for consistently hitting targets on up or down angles, even at extreme ranges. Once a shooter learns how to use this system, it is extremely precise and with some practice, you'll be amazed at how successful you'll be at hitting long range targets, under any situation. If you are new to long range shooting or want to learn a few more tips, I'd recommend taking Ward's Personalized shooting school and using the Angle Cosine Indicator. It is money well spent.
     
  12. WWB

    WWB <b>SPONSOR</b>

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    ACI, Shooting School and Thank You for the kind words

    Ernie: Thank you for the endorsement and the use of the ACI(s).

    Bryan: Cool. I really appreciate your endorsement too; Thank you.
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2008
  13. jmden

    jmden Well-Known Member

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    Thank you! Sorry to butt in here...
     
  14. Jacedeuce

    Jacedeuce New Member

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    Ward,

    Thank you for you post on Angle Shooting.

    There is something that has bothered me about the standard doctrine for angle shooting. The theory behind the doctrine is that when shooting on an angle the flat line distance from the shooter to the target is less than the actual distance between the shooter and the target. Every time it has been explained to me, the compensation for the angle is needed because there is less flat line distance for gravity to affect the bullet's motion. However, gravity's affect is cumulative over time and not distance. I'm not a physicist but would that not suggest that gravity should still have the same affect on the bullet when shooting on an angle as when shooting on a flat line?

    If this is true then the bullet would be accelerated by gravity when shooting at a downward angle and impact high as the standard doctrine claims. Now, when shooting at an upward angle, would gravity decelerate the bullet causing the impact to be low?

    I have not found a good explanation for this yet. If you could point me to something that explains this I would be very grateful.

    Jason Hanna
    Scout Sniper
    USMC