Angle Doping???

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by IChaseCoues, Aug 4, 2006.

  1. IChaseCoues

    IChaseCoues Well-Known Member

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    I am looking for a low cost, compact method of determining vertical angle to target.

    Most of my hunting is in some pretty steep terrain.

    Any suggestions?

    I have a plastic credit card looking thing with angles on it that may work, but would like to have some more ideas!
    I'm saving up money for an ACI, but need something until then.
     
  2. Slopeshunter

    Slopeshunter Well-Known Member

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    I just read a review yesterday of a new rangefinder leupold has out. It'll figure out the angle and then tell you the horizontal distance you should aim for.

    I believe you can put in your calibre & load into it and it will also give you MOA adjustments.

    Sounds neat, although I know nothing more about it besides just reading the review. Didn't mention the cost.
     

  3. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    Slopeshunter,
    Do a search and read the review from goodgrouper about it. I would not buy one.
     
  4. Wild_Bill

    Wild_Bill Well-Known Member

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    Hi if you are in very steep terain just aim dead on to 300 yards and you should be good to go just make up some range cards with angles on them and geus until you can get an ACI. I have just recieved an ACI they are awsome so well made i am getting some gear togethor to test a Rem TActicle rifle and i believe a level and ACI are imperitive.

    Cheers Bill
    Australia
     
  5. Slopeshunter

    Slopeshunter Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the pointer there eaglet. I didn't know that Leupy wasn't in the same category with their rangefinders as their scopes.
     
  6. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    It's not that low cost but it is precise. It is cheaper than the cosine tool.

    [​IMG]

    I'm thinking one of these would do just what we're looking for. Craftsman 6-1/2 in. SmartTool Plus Module Sears item #00939756000.

    Just aim at the target and press the hold button. Now you have the exact angle to the 10th of a degree. It even reads in percent to simplify the yardage calculation. For aiming a guy might just mount it to a small scope and keep it in a pocket or just simply sight down the flat edge.
     
  7. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    Lord Willing, I'll be betting the ACI. For now this has worked pretty good for me. I eventually lay it on the side of the stock to get a reading.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Slopeshunter

    Slopeshunter Well-Known Member

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    Eaglet, where can you find one of those?

    tks
     
  9. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    I walked in one of the local warehouses and there is was... can't remember which one.
    you may try:This LInk $10.39
    If the link does not work, type in Yahoo search engine
    "dasco pro angle finder" without the quotes and it'll take you to it.
     
  10. Slopeshunter

    Slopeshunter Well-Known Member

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    Great, thanks!
     
  11. jwp475

    jwp475 Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    It's not that low cost but it is precise. It is cheaper than the cosine tool.

    [​IMG]

    I'm thinking one of these would do just what we're looking for. Craftsman 6-1/2 in. SmartTool Plus Module Sears item #00939756000.

    Just aim at the target and press the hold button. Now you have the exact angle to the 10th of a degree. It even reads in percent to simplify the yardage calculation. For aiming a guy might just mount it to a small scope and keep it in a pocket or just simply sight down the flat edge.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    It is not attached to the rifle and is slower to use, it is also difficult to hold the rifle on target and hold and read at the same time.Also requires you to figure the cosine. The cosine indicator is simpler to use and the cosine is giving to you not the angle which makes it much quicker to use. The cosine indicator is worth the cost in my opion........
     
  12. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    "It is not attached to the rifle and is slower to use, it is also difficult to hold the rifle on target and hold and read at the same time.Also requires you to figure the cosine. The cosine indicator is simpler to use and the cosine is giving to you not the angle which makes it much quicker to use. The cosine indicator is worth the cost in my opion........ "


    [/ QUOTE ]
    A true cosine would be meaningless to the average guy. That's why the reading in percent just like the ACI gun mounted tool does would be so handy. The electronic measure with the hold button potentially would be more accurate. The other simple angle finders require two people to read it. One to aim it, the other to read it. The electronic one you could use by yourself just like the ACI unit but is much cheaper and handier to get a quick reading.
    [​IMG]
    The term cosine is misleading. It really indicates percentage from 90 degrees to level. Example
    A reading of 76 percent from the ACI or the Craftsman tool applied to 15 inches of elevation correction would be .76 x 15 = 11.4” correction for the shot.
    A simple angle finder requires the addition conversion. 68.4 degrees on the angle finder would be converted for the shot. 68.4 / 90 = 76 percent x 15 = 11.4”


    The reading in degrees from the angle finder is still going to have to be converted with a calculator to percentage. Now tell me just what 73 percent of 18.4" inches of drop is while your holding your rifle on target. Do you have a calculator or a palm pilot with ExBal mounted to your rifle too? No matter how you do it, you still have to put the gun down to do the calculations. Why swing that bulky rifle up for an angle reading?
     
  13. IChaseCoues

    IChaseCoues Well-Known Member

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    I thought the ACI readings were cosine numbers! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif
    I understood it as:
    If, ACI reading = 94
    Then, multiply .94x(ranged yardage) and use the drop data for the outcome.

    Example:
    ACI reading = 94
    Ranged yardage = 465
    .94 x 465 = 437
    Elevation value for 437 yards = 5.1 MOA
    Dial 5 MOA up and squeeze!
    Is that right?
    It sounds like I just need to sell some stuff I have laying around and get an ACI, just hope I get enough $$$ to do it.

    It seems the easiest would be a pocket ballistic program and enter ACI reading in it and use the firing solution it gives.
     
  14. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    The term cosine is misleading. It really indicates percentage from 90 degrees to level. Example
    A reading of 76 percent from the ACI or the Craftsman tool applied to 15 inches of elevation correction would be .76 x 15 = 11.4” correction for the shot.


    [/ QUOTE ]

    Cosine really means the ACI is giving you the Cosine of the slope angle that you're shooting measured from the horizontal. When you read 77 on the ACI it really means that you’re shooting at a vertical angle (up hill or down hill) from the horizontal of 40° degrees. The Cosine (40°) = 0.7660, so a reading from the ACI of 76 or 77 will be close enough to say is a 40° angle but ACI gives you the information that would be more ready for you to use, that would be 76 or 77.