Africa

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by 7mmRemMag, Jun 18, 2012.

  1. 7mmRemMag

    7mmRemMag Well-Known Member

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    So I'm going to South Africa in September with my father on a safari hunt. The animals on our list so far are....

    1 Kudu
    1 Zebra
    1 Gemsbok
    1 Impala
    1 Warthog

    My questions to any one who has already been are.....
    1.) What is the average range I should expect to take a shot?
    2.) For the game that we will be hunting what caliber do you recommend?

    Since these animals are not considered dangerous game, I figured that a 270wsm or 7mm Rem mag shooting some bonded bullets would be adequate. But if any one else has experienced Africa already please let me know what you think and what I should expect on the trip.

    Thanks in advance guys.

    Jay
     
  2. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    I have been to Botswanna twice years ago and shot the game your going after as well as other species including lion and cape buffalo. The rifles you suggest with heavy bonded bullets should do fine. A friend of mine lives in South Africa and uses a 7mm Mag for all his plains game shooting. Stick with broadside, heart lung shots on the kudu, zebra and gemsbok. They are pretty thick skinned and tough muscled. Shot distance will vary with the terrain but generally the pro hunter will work on 100-200 yard shots. You should expect to be stalking, and shooting from a standing position. They are big on the use of shooting sticks there. Because i was also hunting larger game, I used a 375 H&H for everything on both trips, except for lion on my second trip, where I also brought my 500-450 H&H double rifle. My longest shot was my kudu at 300 yards, my closest were the buffalo and the lion at 20-30 yards. All the other plains game was shot under 200 yards. Africa is an incredible experience! I think you and your father ill enjoy it.
     

  3. 7mmRemMag

    7mmRemMag Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the quick response. That is so awesome that you have been there twice and have taken all those animals. I used to own a 300wby mag but to date the largest caliber I have is a 300win mag. But my 7mm Rem Mag and 160gr Accubonds are my "go to" weapon of choice. Its really accurate and fun to shoot with the muzzle brake on it as is my 270wsm 140gr Nosler Accubonds with little recoil. I may just take them both and use the 270wsm for the smaller game and the 7mm for the 3 larger thicker skinned and heavy muscled game you mentioned. I'm really excited to get to go with my dad He will be turning 62 in September days before we go. I know It's going to be once in a lifetime experience for me! Thanks for your recommendations.
     
  4. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Most African guides are going to limit your range to 400yds or less and that being the case the 7mm Mag with the 150-180gr bullets should more than get the job done for you. Most shots will likely be in the 100-200yds range.

    Bullet wise I'd suggest Hornady Interbond, Scirocco, or Accubonds.

    The only really tough animal on the list is the Warthogs and with them no matter what bullet you choose I'd say go for the double shoulder or just below and behind the ear shot to ensure they are dirt dead before the bullet even exits.

    I have a very good friend/client in S. Africa and their go to for plains game is the 6.5 Swede.
     
  5. 7mmRemMag

    7mmRemMag Well-Known Member

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    A 400 yard shot would be sweet if the shot would permit itself especially for a good video. I will be shooting Accubonds out of either of the rifles we take.

    Thanks
     
  6. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    You should be in fine shape. Keep in mind as mentioned above in all likelihood you'll be shooting standing supported for most of your shots so get out and practice shooting off of shooting sticks.

    Based on that practice, set your own realistic range limit and stick to it and you'll have a great experience.

    I've got a standing invitation to go to S. Africa and so in a few years I expect I'll get my turn as well.

    I'll take two rifles. My Model 70 300WM and one of my 7mm STW's.
     
  7. 7mmRemMag

    7mmRemMag Well-Known Member

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    I picked up some nice tripod shooting sticks I took with me to New Mexico last year. I will start using them over the next few weeks to practice as well as get myself on a strict diet to shed a few lbs before we go since we will do that much walking lol. I kind of lucked out on getting to tag along on this one, my dad won the bid on the hunt for a really cheap price. All inclusive except for airfare. It will be both of our first times in Africa so we are counting down the days.

    Thanks again
     
  8. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    The only other advise that I would give pertains to scope choice. Given it is likely that you will shoot standing off sticks, you may have been stalking, perhaps moving quickly, dealing with ranges from 50-300 yards, and partial visibility of the game due to brushy terrain, scope choice/ power setting is important. In this day and age of high power variables , there is a tendency to set too high a power or play with the power setting while hunting. The trophy sized animals are smart and won't stand still for long maybe offering only a few seconds for a shot. I used a fixed 4x for everything, including a heart/ lung shot on a kudu at 300 yards and it worked very well under these varied conditions. A few of my animals gave only a very brief shot. Bouncing crosshairs, and trying to find your trophy in the thicket will lower your chances of success. Practice at a lower power setting and speed. Forget changing magnification during an encounter unless you really have an open shot on an unaware animal. It will pay a big dividend. iMHO.
     
  9. 7mmRemMag

    7mmRemMag Well-Known Member

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    That really makes a whole lot of sense. And your absolutely right I have caught myself moving the magnification settings many times. I will definately practice with a lower setting and try to condition myself not to move it. Thanks for the heads up and all the info. It is a big plus to hear from the ones who have already been there and done that. I really appreciate it.
     
  10. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    You are very welcome. Glad to help. When I first went when I was 30 years old there weren't that many people going. It was a lot of learning on the fly. I had saved for 10 years to fulfill my childhood dream. Went alone, met the pro hunter and two trackers, on a puptent safari, camping in the bush out of a couple of mokurus(tree dugouts). It was an adventure and worth every cent. Went back 7 years later.
     
  11. Outlaw6.0

    Outlaw6.0 Well-Known Member

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    I've got a question & maybe Grey can help answer this. I've read in many many different publications that a lot of African Guides frown upon & some flat out ban the use of muzzle brakes. I can't say how true that statement is (although it does make sense). You may contact your guide & ensure they don't have a problem with that.

    PS- congrats on the African hunt, that is something I have been dreaming about for a LONG time. :rolleyes:

    If we don't get pics... you're banned for life! :D
     
  12. Greyfox

    Greyfox Well-Known Member

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    I believe that the negativity on muzzle brakes is changing due to the popularity of them. If they outright ban them they will let you know in the pre hunt correspondence. My buddy has been there several times with his braked 300 Weatherby and 416 Weatherby. No issues, but he said to bring some extra disposable ear plugs if needed for guide, trackers.
     
  13. Outlaw6.0

    Outlaw6.0 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the Clarification Grey, I can understand both sides of the issue. A 416 Weatherby w/brake sure could ring the bell of a fella not wearing earplugs!
     
  14. gillettehunter

    gillettehunter Well-Known Member

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    Congrats on the trip. Last year I was in the East Cape. Bushbuck was 307 yards. Cull Impala 373 yards. The rest were under 200 yards. As was suggested spend lots of time on the shooting sticks. I took over a set of Trigger sticks and my sons PH bought them from me w/ his tip $. Just saw a more recent video of my PH and he is now using a set of them.
    You may wish to spend a little bit of time on africahunting.com. Another free web site that I'm a member of. They have a segment on before and after the hunt. Lots of good things to know to help your trip go smoothly. I would suggest that you decide beforehand about whether you will have the taxidermy done in Africa or in the US. Pros and cons both ways. Make sure you have the form 4457 on guns Binocs and perhaps expensive cameras and scopes.
    On your rifle. Some African countries have a 7mm min caliber restriction. Usually not enforced. Many times the PH will have a min caliber that he will let clients hunt with. Your 7mm will do a great job on all of the animals on your list. I'm sure you will have a great time. Good luck. Bruce