affect of canelure on trajectory?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by efw, Sep 27, 2005.

  1. efw

    efw Well-Known Member

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    I have been working up a load for my '06 that I can use as a "catch all," meaning anything from pronghorn to elk. The fact that I'd like to work up something capable of elk eliminated the Ballistic Tip which is too light in construction, so I went to the SST but am wondering about the Interbond... does the lack of cannelure have an appreciable affect on trajectory, enough to justify the extra $10/box in cost? I understand that the chemical bonding is what causes the increase in cost, but I am not particularly concerned about that at this point.

    Any assistance would be appreciated.
     
  2. sewwhat89

    sewwhat89 Well-Known Member

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    At the velocities you will be shooting at in a 30-06, I would say a Nosler Partition would be the best you could shoot all-around. It has not failed my father in over 35 years, nor I in the 12 years I have used it. Taken game with it from .243, .25-06, 7mm RM, 708, 308, 3006, 300 WM, 338 WM. Absolutely no need for a bonded bullet in a .30-06. If you wanted to shoot a polymer-tipped bullet, pick either the Nosler AccuBond or Hornady InterBond for the retained weight you will need on the elk. m2c
     

  3. kraky2

    kraky2 Well-Known Member

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    DO NOT even think about using an sst on elk. It is as frangible or worse than the ballistic tip. We have used them on whitetail deer here in wisconsin and are getting huge holes and lots of bloodshot meat. While I'm sure it could kill an elk it simply isn't up to the task when bone and tough shots will be encountered.
    I sincerely believe the interbond came about because Hornady knew the plastic tip on top of the well liked interlock(which is what the sst is) was causing much faster expansion that was desired on big game.
    Re the cannelure affecting the flight of the bullet I can only think it would be so minimal it just wouldn't matter at all for any reasonable hunting ranges.
     
  4. Guest

    Guest Guest

    The canelure does cause a little turbulence and lowers the bc a little. For LR use a bullet with no canelure. In my experence the SST is just as fragile as the BT.
     
  5. jb1000br

    jb1000br Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]

    JB /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  6. bucknutz

    bucknutz Well-Known Member

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    nice shot jb! it looks like it has vanes like an arrow.it probably helps stabalize the wiggle. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    10-4 on the 165gr partition or AB
     
  7. Reloader

    Reloader Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    I have been working up a load for my '06 that I can use as a "catch all," meaning anything from pronghorn to elk. The fact that I'd like to work up something capable of elk eliminated the Ballistic Tip which is too light in construction, so I went to the SST but am wondering about the Interbond... does the lack of cannelure have an appreciable affect on trajectory, enough to justify the extra $10/box in cost? I understand that the chemical bonding is what causes the increase in cost, but I am not particularly concerned about that at this point.


    [/ QUOTE ]

    The SST is much more explosive than a NBT from my experience an a couple others I load for. Opinion was based on how they performed on Whitetail deer.

    The jacket would seperate at impact even at lower velocities and the bullets didn't exit on several. The NBTs seem to hold together and exit due to the thicker jacket and solid base. I've only used the NBTs on pigs and deer but, I know some guys that have loved them on elk(the heavy for cal versions). I've already seen two Moose hammered w/ NBTs on "The Outdoor Channel" this year, both one shot kills.

    The only three NBTs I've ever seen not exit an animal were on two raking shots on bucks over 200 pounds and both of those were nicely mushroomed under the far hide in front of the rear ham (Nice Mushrooms) and the third on a HUGE 500 pound cornfield Boar. The boar dropped and bullet made it to the far shield. All three of those were high velocity impacts(.284 140s & 150... 3210fps, 3110 fps).

    If you want expansion go w/ a NBT. If Elk are on the menu, I'd go w/ AB/IB.

    Good Luck!

    Reloader
     
  8. Varmint Hunter

    Varmint Hunter Well-Known Member

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    The Barnes TSX bullets have 3 wide grooves which would certainly effect bullet flight more than a singule, small canalure. Barnes boasts some very high BC's for their bullets.

    Just a thought.
     
  9. efw

    efw Well-Known Member

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    Varmint Hunter: that was my thought when I first saw that new design of theirs as well.

    So all, am I hearing you suggest that, if I want a boat tail designed bullet for the purpose I set out with, that I should either go w/ the standard 165 gr SPBT Interlock/Game King or step up to some bonded thing like the Interbond?

    I'll likely step up to the Interbond, as the reason I'd wanted to go w/ a polymer tipped construction was the massive increase in BC.

    Thanks a ton!
     
  10. kraky2

    kraky2 Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure what your intended range of hunting is but don't be fooled into thinking there is "massive" differences in a polimer tipped bullets flight path at ranges out to say....400 yds. First off don't believe everything you read from manuafacturers re coefficients.
    Think hard about going with a well constructed bullet for your intended use. Yes, if those interbonds do shoot good they will be ever so slightly flatter than say a nosler partition out to 400 yds---but I would bet a dollar that if the nosler partition shoots more accurate than the polimer tipped bullet it will shoot just as flat because it won't be losing ballistics while wobbling through the air. I've learned through ten years of reloading the hit you put on animal at longer range will be because of the accuracy of the bullet, your knowledge of gun trajectory, and your ability to estimate range. Accuracy will be the most important....not the type of tip or whether it has a bc of .450 or one of .500.
     
  11. wapiti13

    wapiti13 Well-Known Member

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    EFW, Very hard for one bullet does all. The Nosler Accubond or the 168 gr TSX Barnes would fit your needs. Personally, I've stuck with the Barnes with excellent results. Depends on how many elk vs deer/antelope you really plan on hunting. If cost is not a factor, throw in the Swift Scorroco. High bc with a tough bullet. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif