7MM STW for long range moose??

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by Digger2, Nov 14, 2010.

  1. Digger2

    Digger2 New Member

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    Hey guys, I'm looking at re-barreling my 8lb Rem 700 24" barreled 7mm mag and putting on a 26" custom one in 7mm STW. The question I have is what kind of performance are you guys getting on big game with this caliber and really, is this gun big enough for what I want it to do. Max range for me would be around 500yds. I would be loading up either the 140gr TSX or the 160gr TSX. The gun is going to be used for moose at ranges mentioned. I also considered the 300 win mag and fast .33's (338 RUM & 340 Wby) due to the size of the game, but I really like the idea of this 7mm STW and it's little nicer to shoot. Any input/experience would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.....
     
  2. Loner

    Loner Well-Known Member

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    Out to 500 is no trick on moose. But go with a barrel twist that will handle 175 grain
    bullets. 160's would be the minimum I would shoot on an animal that large. Your 7mm
    is plenty enough at that range as well with the heavier bullets. A 175 at 500 in the
    stw will have in the area of 2200 ft lbs with a 3000 fps muzzle velocity. You need a
    26 inch barrel with the stw. Any shorter and it suffers. I don't see much difference
    in recoil between the 300 wmag and the stw. The 300 certainly is more efficient at
    delivering is payload with less powder and a shorter barrel.
     

  3. partisan1911

    partisan1911 Well-Known Member

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    I have shot four decent moose now using a .308 up to a 45-70. a 7mm STW will work great but I suggest using the biggest bullet you can as well. Depending on where you are going and the temperatures determine how thick the critter is at the time. Moose can get pretty thick so deep penetration is a must even if shooting a lung shot.
     
  4. Derek M.

    Derek M. Well-Known Member

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  5. Digger2

    Digger2 New Member

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    Thanks for the replies so far guys. I just wanted to know what I should be looking at as I am totally new to the longer range hunting game. I just didn't know if the 7 STW would have enough horsepower to do the job or if I should just go to the 300 Win mag for ease of brass, efficiency, etc. Is the STW that much faster/better than 7mm mag that I should even bother or should I just look at something else for my needs?? Maybe a 340 Wby?? I just didn't really want to get into high recoil, because it doesn't make it enjoyable to shoot them then.
     
  6. Derek M.

    Derek M. Well-Known Member

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    I suggest you buy either a 7mm Remington Magnum or a 300 Win Mag and be done with it. Easy to find quality brass, recoil is manageable, and easy to get a good shooting handload in either. I have 2 7mm Rem Mags and would take either on a moose hunt and would shoot one out to 900 yards or even 1000.

    7STW can be picky
     
  7. Loner

    Loner Well-Known Member

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    The stw is a lot faster, in the 100-150 fps range. But it was designed for, and really shines with 140 grain bullets. Then it is about 250 fps faster. With the longer barrel
    though. But with a 1:8.5 twist and 175's you are talking 3100 fps and a whopping
    3700 ft lbs of energy at the muzzle. Capable of any game about anywhere with the
    proper bullet. Brass is easy to get, loaded rounds are in most stores now a days and
    with 140's at 3450 fps the gun is a desert delight.
     
  8. partisan1911

    partisan1911 Well-Known Member

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    It might also depend on how the terrain and foliage is in your hunting area. It is amazing how well those big animals can hide and how hard it is to quarter them up when they run and fall into a creek. A couple years ago I had one run about 20 yards and die in the middle of deadfall. That was a pain to take care of.
     
  9. Speedo

    Speedo Well-Known Member

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    Moose are generally pretty easy to kill compared to some other animals but they can be a lot of work to take care of once they are down. If you're not prepared they can be intimidating to take care of on flat ground. It pays to know the terrain you're hunting and to be prepared for any situation. For long range shooting you need to locate plenty of land marks because everything will look different once you get close to the kill site.

    Gus
     
  10. partisan1911

    partisan1911 Well-Known Member

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    I remember my first moose. All I had was my atv to get it back to my truck 6 miles away through some pretty bad stuff. Shortly thereafter I built a meat wagon and never looked back.
     
  11. Speedo

    Speedo Well-Known Member

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    I've been hunting since before the 3 wheeler and 4 wheelers were around and doing it with buggies for a lot of years. About 15 or 16 years ago we figured out that we could pick up a whole moose and take it to where ever we wanted to, to take care of the skinning and gutting.

    Gus
    [​IMG]
     
  12. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    I kinda dig the meat buggies!!!:D I need a snow cat with rubber tracks to do something like that in my country. Horses will have to do:D
     
  13. Capt Academy

    Capt Academy Well-Known Member

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    Now, that's smart!!!!!