7mm REM MAG

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by djcompto, Jan 21, 2005.

  1. djcompto

    djcompto Active Member

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    I am very interested in learning the rewarding skills of taking game at very long distances. I have a stock Savage 110 in the 7mm REM MAG. Is this a viable caliber for very long ranges? What should I do the rifle to make it consistent? I was thinking a new stock to make the barrel free floating but beyond that, I am open to suggestions. Any help would be great!!

    Dan
     
  2. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    Djcompton,

    First off, welcome to LRH!!!

    IF your going to use the factory barrel, you are limited in what you can do as far as receiver accurizing goes.

    What you could do though is have the barrel crowned with a true match quality crown. Float the barrel, and I would highly recommend getting an aftermarket stock and having it bedded properly either with a glass bedding job if the stock has an aluminum bedding block or pillar bedding if it does not.

    Other then that, a quality trigger job will also help you shoot the rifle consistantly from shot to shot.

    Generally, the Savage rifles shoot better then they really should for what they are sold for.

    How does your rifle shoot right now?

    Good Shooting!!!

    Kirby Allen(50)
     
  3. thocon

    thocon Well-Known Member

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    Floating bolt,Old man Savage was a real gun engineer!He solved alot of time and effort with his ways,And after all most people can't or won't shoot past it's ability ever.
     
  4. djcompto

    djcompto Active Member

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    Thanks for the great welcome guys!
    Kirby, right now my savage shoots great! I am regularly taking coyotes aout to 200 yards. My great uncle has a 500 yard range on his farm, and I would really enjoy tweaking the rifle as much as possible. I was contemplating purchasing a custom long range gun, but if the 7mm is a viable caliber for long ranges (+500) I think I can spend the money in gunsmithing and have one great shooting rifle. I am thinking about having a heavy barrel installed when I have it re-bedded in a custom stock. Any suggestions on somewhere that offers custom stocks and accessories online?

    Thanks!
    Dan
     
  5. preacherman

    preacherman Well-Known Member

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  6. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    Djcompton,

    www.sharpshooters.com is a great place for after market Savage parts.

    If your looking for stocks youcan also go to www.boydboys.com as they offer laminated wood stocks for the Savage rifles. I have fitted alot of these and with a proper bedding the perform great.

    Good Shooting!!

    Kirby Allen(50)
     
  7. Mysticplayer

    Mysticplayer Writers Guild

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    To answer your question directly, the 7mm family is an excellent cal for LR hunting INSIDE 1000yds. I would look at loading H4831SC or H1000 under a 162gr SST or Amax lit by a Fed 215m primer (expect 2900 to 3000fps). Cases sized with a Lee collet neck die. Seat bullets as close to the lands as you can and still feed from the mag, if desired.

    Odds are you will be able to get this rifle shooting 1/2" or less at 100yds. It would also stay inside MOA at 500yds.

    To determine how far you can use this for LR hunting, determine how far you can hit a milk jug 100%. This is the size of the kill zone on the average deer. Larger animal, larger kill zone.

    My guess is that from a solid rest and ideal conditions 700yds should be possible. That may be much further then you should hunt, at least for now. Get a Leica rangefinder and a scope with consistent turrents. Make a drop table.

    Practise ranging, dialing up, and hitting your target (milk jug). When you are so comfortable with doing this, practise when the weather gets windy or lousy. A real eye opener about distance and accuracy under field conditions. Don't be surprised if you max range drops by half or more.

    Be honest with yourself and your skills. They will most certainly improve with time and practise.

    I would not hesitate to use this combo on deer to 800yds. Under hunting conditions, that is a mighty long ways.

    Jerry
     
  8. djcompto

    djcompto Active Member

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    Jerry,
    Thank you very much for your direct answers. Your post has answered many questions that I was having. Looks like once I get my new barrel and stock, I have a lot of practice to get under my belt! I like the milk jug idea. What is the best way to make a drop table??

    Thanks
    Dan
     
  9. bobdds

    bobdds New Member

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    I have just purchased the sako 75 in 7mmstw. I am going to restock with McMillan and put a Leupold with Premier Reticle tuneup. What I am wondering is if I should right now have some barrel work done, lapping for example. How good is the Sako out of the box?
     
  10. bobdds

    bobdds New Member

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    I also wonder about what effect on accuracy from a muzzle brake on that same Sako 75?
     
  11. BountyHunter

    BountyHunter Writers Guild

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    Bobdds

    1. Muzzle brakes by themselves do not affect accuracy. having said that they can indirectly lead to better groups as you are not fighting recoil and they can change the barrel harmonics either good or bad for that particular load.

    2. Once a barrel is crowned and chambered it can never be successfully lapped by hand by anyone. Anyone who says that they can to is full of BS. All the barrel makers lap before sending the blank out and they can show an enlargement of the bore at the muzzle and chamber ends. They put a cut across the muzzle about 3/4" down to make sure that the end is cut off. Lapping after chambered is a big NO NO.

    You can "fire lap" with either the Neco or Tubbs kits. Advise you to take it easy and only use about 50% of the number of bullets they state and then check to see if you need to do more. Too much and throat is gone.

    My advice is shoot it and see how it shoots. You can lap the lugs on the bolt, check trueness of bolt face and check the crown on the muzzle. Until you rebarrel you are pretty much stuck with the barrel other than recrowning and firelapping without destroying the barrel.

    BH
     
  12. midmoboy

    midmoboy Member

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    I just got back from a Texas pan handle hunt for Aoudad and wild hog. The Sav. 110 7mag I have did great. It's stock except for the Rifle Basix trigger that I put in before I left and the sanding i did on the stock to free float it a little better. It was dual pillar bedded out of the box. Was shooting 150 grain Sierra BTSP Game Kings with 60.1 grain 4350 at 2900fps. Killed a 300lb boar at a hair over 300 yards and a 24" (small but 180lb or so) ram at 180 yards. But I know the gun can group a little better than it is now. Your gun is nothing to be ashamed of. The 7 mag. was a 1000 yard match winner in 1970 and is still used by the secret service snipers.