.358 umt ?

Discussion in 'Guns For Sale' started by C.E.G2860, Aug 26, 2010.

  1. C.E.G2860

    C.E.G2860 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    58
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2009
    I'm looking for a new elk rifle and I was thinking of a 300 RUM but I ran across this 358 UMT and I read that it's faster than a 300 win mag. and shoots flatter than a 7mm. does anybody know about this cal.

    I did some looking and found this.

    Home » Technical » Product News » Publication Mentions » Shooting Illustrated
    Shooting Illustrated

    Shooting Illustrated
    March 2005
    Home Grown

    By Bryce Towsley
    Unlike most of the American big game hunting public I have always been a fan of .35 caliber rifles. Physics is physics and big bullets simply hit harder. The downside, even in cartridges like the .35 Whelen, has been a trajectory that is too curved by today’s magnum-loving standards. But when Remington brought out the .300 Ultra Mag in 1999, I saw an opportunity. Even though they had plans for a family of cartridges based on the parent case, I knew it would be a long wait for a .35, so I built my own.
    I decided to keep it simple and necked the .300 RUM case up to .358 with no other changes. It maintains the same body taper, the same 30-degree shoulder and the same datum line for headspacing. The only difference is a larger, slightly shorter neck and the resulting shorter shoulder. I called the new cartridge the .358 Ultra Mag Towsley (UMT).
    The .358 UMT shoots flatter than a 7mm Remington Magnum with a 160-grain bullet or a .300 Winchester with a 180-grain bullet. In the .358 UMT a Nosler Partition 225-grain bullet at 3,225 feet per second that’s zeroed for 200 yards is only 5.72 inches low at 300 yards. The .300 Win Mag with the same zero is 7.60 inches low at 300 yards and the 7mm Rem Mag drops 7.24 inches.
    The .358 UMT with a 250-grain bullet produces 5,388 foot-pounds of muzzle energy. That is over 1,000 foot-pounds more muzzle energy than the .375 H&H 300-grain factory load. The .358 UMT has more energy than the .416 Remington 400-grain factory load at any range, including at the muzzle. At 100 yards it still has more energy than the .375 H&H has at the muzzle and at 200 yards it retains 3,676 ft-lbs, almost as much as the .338 Win Mag has at the muzzle.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2010
  2. huntfish

    huntfish Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    294
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2008
    I think you should build one in a ultra-light set-up. Lighten the action, the bolt, and barrel. No muzzle break. Shoot the heaviest bullets possible. Should be a joy on the bench. :)
     

  3. C.E.G2860

    C.E.G2860 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    58
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2009
    That would probable be fun for the people watching me shoot it, but not for me.
     
  4. huntfish

    huntfish Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    294
    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2008
    I bear hunted with a man who shot 358 sta, which of course is 8RemMag necked up. It was a beast.
     
  5. 30-338

    30-338 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    214
    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2008
    My only thought would be make sure you study carefully the possible bullets you want to use. I looked quickly at the selection and the BC's were not great. All depends how far you want to shoot. Good luck! 30-338
     
  6. Loki Dog

    Loki Dog Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    96
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2009
    That sounds good. However I believe I will stick with my 338 edge. Good bullet selection and shoots tight groups a long distance off. Loki
     
  7. C.E.G2860

    C.E.G2860 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    58
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2009
    Well I've never heard anything about a .358 UMT untill now and I though I would ask about it. It still sounds nice and I am going to study to see and learn a little more about it.
    But Thanks for the comments.
     
  8. Iowaboy

    Iowaboy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    145
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2009
    A 300 grain 338 out of an edge at 2850 makes the same amount of power 5400lbs. Food for thought.

    But you can't deny a 35 cal verses a 33 cal makes a bigger hole in and out so should have a better chance of knock down power.
     
  9. C.E.G2860

    C.E.G2860 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    58
    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2009
    I have done some more looking and I found this on the .358 UMT.

    Loading Data tested in the Barnes Ballistic Laboratory
    .358 Ultra Mag Towsley

    Bullet
    Powder & Charge
    Velocity
    FPS
    Accuracy
    100 yds
    Pressure
    Psi
    Barnes 250-grain X-Bullet ​
    IMR-7828
    91.0 grains ​
    2,889 ​
    -​
    56,900 ​
    Barnes 250-grain X-Bullet ​
    H-1000
    98.5 grains ​
    2,887 ​
    1.75 ​
    56,500 ​
    Barnes 250-grain X-Bullet ​
    RL-25
    90.0 grains ​
    2,965 ​
    1.25 ​
    58,900 ​
    Barnes
    250-grain Solid ​
    H-1000
    98.5 grains ​
    2,887 ​
    -​
    51,200 ​
    Barnes
    250-grain Solid ​
    IMR-7828
    91 grains ​
    - ​
    -​
    48,700 ​
    Barnes 225-grain X-Bullet ​
    RL-25
    98.5 grains ​
    3,048 ​
    1.25 ​
    60,300 ​
    Barnes 225-grain X-Bullet ​
    H-1000
    101.1 grains ​
    2,990 ​
    1.25 ​
    59,400 ​
    Barnes 225-grain X-Bullet ​
    IMR-7828
    95.0 grains ​
    3,039 ​
    0.5 ​
    59,100 ​
    Barnes225-
    grain X-Bullet ​
    Ram Shot Magnum 103.0 grains ​
    3,045 ​
    N/A ​
    58,600 ​
    Barnes 225-grain X-Bullet ​
    MRP
    96.0 grains ​
    3,058 ​
    1.1 ​
    58,100 ​
    Barnes 225-grain XLC Coated ​
    IMR-7828
    98.0 grains ​
    3,100 ​
    .75 ​
    N/A ​
    Barnes 180 grain X-Bullet ​
    MRP
    101.5 grains ​
    3,408 ​
    1.5 ​
    59,000 ​
    Barnes 180 grain X-Bullet ​
    RL-25
    106.0 Grains ​
    3,398 ​
    2.0 ​
    58,700 ​
    Barnes 180 grain X-Bullet ​
    IMR-7828
    102.0 ​
    3,341 ​
    1.75 ​
    59,100 ​
    Nosler 250-grain Partition ​
    H-1000
    102.0 grains ​
    3,029 ​
    1.2 ​
    61,400 ​
    Nosler 225 grain Ballistic Tip ​
    H-1000
    104.0 grains ​
    3,011 ​
    2.0 ​
    57,300 ​
    Re-published with permission from the Shooting Illustrated March 2005 issue.