.338 magnums.

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by JST, Apr 14, 2011.

  1. JST

    JST Well-Known Member

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    Ok this is my first post on here so be gentle. I have got a fever for a new rifle. I am leaning toward a .338. I have a 300 Winchester, but am wanting something thats a bit more hell on wheels. I have shot a 338 win, and wasn't impressed. Shot a buddys 338 Rum. Liked it a lot. I am not new to large calibers, or long range having experience with a 375 and a .50 bmg from my military days. I am really liking what I am reading on here bout the Allen magnums. But what would help me out is if somebody could break down the .338s for me as far as performance, ie speed, accuracy etc. And what is out there, the RUM, Lapau, Edge etc. Cost would help too. But I hand load so not to big of a deal I don't think. lol.

    Sorry to be so long winded.

    Thanks in advance and what a great websight.
     

  2. Long Time Long Ranger

    Long Time Long Ranger Well-Known Member

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    All are accurate. That depends on the barrel and rifle, not the cartridge. Just depends on how much you want to spend and what your purpose is with the rifle.

    Performance wise you mentioned the three that are virtually identical in performance with no seperation there. Take your pick. All three average shooting a 300 grain bullet a little over 2800 fps with most accuracy loads. 338 RUM, 338-300 RUM and 338 Lapua.

    340 wby a little over 2700 fps.
    The three you mentioned a little over 2800 fps.
    Lapua Improved into the 2900's.
    338-378 wby a little over 3000 fps.
    Improved 338-378 wby over 3100 fps
    338-416 rigby improved and Excaliber can get up to 3200 fps depending on the individual rifle and barrel length.
    338-416 chey-tac improved can hit over 3300 fps.

    The Allen 338's are his version of the 338 lapua improved and the 338-416 chey tac improved.
     

  3. liltank

    liltank Well-Known Member

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    From what I have read and experience I have with 338's, this is merely my opinion. The 338 Win is your entry level. Depending on what bullet you are running determines its performance. With the new Hornady 285BTHP it will make this thing an entry level competitor. I have had experience with the 338 Win also and only shot 215SGK out of it. Velocities for the Win are going to be around 2950 for lighter bullets, and when shooting the 300's you looking in the realm of about 2500fps. Distance is 1000 to 1200yds depending on species of game and bullet selection.

    The next step up is the Edge, RUM, and Lapua. The RUM and EDGE are identical twins ballistacally. The edge in the 3 choices go to the Lapua. It will due a little better than the EDGE and RUM, by 25 to 50 fps with the 300grn bullet. Your going to get between 2700 to 2850 with these 3. These will go to 1000 to 1500 depending on velocity, altitude, and bullet.

    Now for the smoke wagons, you want the 338-378 Weatherby or the 338AM. They will be the biggest medicine for anything in N. America out to 1500yds plus. The Weatherby can push a 300grn bullet to around 3100fps where the Allen Mag I have seen quoted to 3300 and maybe even 3400, but that is really pushing the cartridge. Distance for these big boys are 1000 to 1800yds depending on bullet and the other variables mentioned.

    Tank
     
  4. HARPERC

    HARPERC Well-Known Member

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    I have the .338 RUM. Brass is the downside of using this cartridge. Currently I've got Nosler brass backordered. If it ever arrives it will come in a box of 25, priced higher per 25 than the .300 RUM in a box of 50 my partner uses as the basis for his "Edge". I've opted for shooting this barrel out over rechambering, but I won't be coming this way again. Love the cartridge, hate the logistics.
    I've been using the brass from the 5 boxes of Federal Premium I purchased to get started initially, and it's been the worst I've seen, flash holes, primer pockets, measured capacities
    and dimensions all pretty rough. The supposed advantage of "factory ammo available" hasn't really panned out for me.
     
  5. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    I hope you have better luck with Nosler brass than I did. It is made by Federal.

    I use the 338 Remington brass and noticed that it has doubled since I bought it.
    But I have had good luck with it.

    Hopefully it will go down in the near future.

    I have very good luck with 250 grain bullets in my RUM and If anyone ever makes a 300 grain
    hunting bullet I may go to the Excalibur to take advantage of the case capacity and velocity
    potential.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  6. jeffwhip

    jeffwhip Well-Known Member

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  7. Long Time Long Ranger

    Long Time Long Ranger Well-Known Member

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    I agree those new rifles from Shawn are worth looking at. I can tell he spent quite a bit of time designing a very nice functional rifle.

    Also the raptor from Kirby looks mighty good. Both are fine pieces of work.
     
  8. cody finch

    cody finch Well-Known Member

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    does any one know what the dif is in the +p version. cody
     
  9. liltank

    liltank Well-Known Member

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    About 100fps. Check out the Hybrid Berger tests on the second gen 300grn hybrid.

    http://www.longrangehunting.com/forums/f17/berger-300-gr-hybrid-gen-2-a-70986/

    Shawn is the designer of his +p version, but no one really knows what he is doing exactly. Some that have bought it know, but are sworn to secrecy at the moment until some patents get through.

    Tank
     
  10. yobuck

    yobuck Well-Known Member

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    the performance issues have been very well addressed.
    the main issue is how the gun will be used.
    if its going to be a carrying type elk rifle with an occaisional long shot thats one thing.
    if weight isnt an important issue, and long shots are the primary goal thats another thing.
    in that event there are but 2 good choices. the 338x378 or the cheytac.

    sort of like buying a truck. marginal ones will work, but not all the time and not real well.
     
  11. midwesthunter

    midwesthunter Well-Known Member

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    If your looking to get one I'm going to be selling my 338 Edge. I really like that caliber. I have no experince with the others.
     
  12. Good

    Good Well-Known Member

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    I'm in the boat for a .338 also. My plan was to go light and cheap for a mountain carry/pack rifle that can be used for medium range out to about 700yds shooting the 300g Bergers. Should wind up at around 8-9lbs loaded.

    I acquired a takeoff Rem XCR barrel chambered in 338RUM from a LRH member. Now I just need to have it screwed on and braked.

    My thinking is if it will hold MOA at 700yds I'd be extatic. Realistically though, I'd be happy with 10" at 700 as that's about the kill zone of anything I'd shoot at out that far minus the Coues. But, we'll see. It might surprise me and be a hammer from the get go.

    The "long range" rig will be different though. Probably based on the 408 Chey Tac but in .375 caliber. We'll see.
     
  13. novaman64

    novaman64 Well-Known Member

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    Dont forget about the Norma...
     
  14. JST

    JST Well-Known Member

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    I love this web sight. Ask and ye shall receive. :)