338 lapua setup

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by updogcharmer, Aug 15, 2012.

  1. updogcharmer

    updogcharmer Member

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2011
    trying to figure out how to set up my savage 110 for zero.
    I have a 6x24x56 mildot scope for it but I'm not sure where is a good place to call zero for this rig?

    seems like I should consider range and characteristics of load?

    thanks
     
  2. MHO

    MHO Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    600
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    It will all depend and what ranges you are setting up this load for.
     

  3. updogcharmer

    updogcharmer Member

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2011
    my goal to start is to achieve a 1000 yd shot
     
  4. SavageShtr

    SavageShtr Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    243
    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2009
    A 100-200 yard zero would be a good starting point for you. You should have plenty of scope adjustment to get you to a grand. I have mine zeroed at 100.
     
  5. budlight

    budlight Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    836
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2004
    Whoa! Before you go to far do you have a 20 moa scope base? Anything over 400-500 yards the angled scope bases really work. I have a 34 inch barrel with two inch brake. I don't shoot at anything close. But I worked out some balistic charts with 300 SMK's and I worked out a distant "ZERO" to use minimal clicks for in close and out to 1000.

    Even a flat shooting gun might like a 250 yard "Z" because under 250 it might be only 6 inches high and then out to 600 is just a number of clicks

    It is definately a fun rifle
     
  6. rscott5028

    rscott5028 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,608
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2010
    As stated above, a 20 MOA base is usually a good idea.

    So that when you get to 1000 yds, you'll be near the middle of your adjustment range and still have plenty of adjustment available for windage.

    The yardage you use for your zero doesn't matter technically speaking. 173 yds, 256 yds or whatever. Ballistics software doesn't care and you can print your drop chart accordingly.

    However, hunting and competition can lead to distractions. So, it helps to have something simple to fall back on and confirm.

    Most shooting ranges have a 100yd line. If you ever forget whether you're back at zero or a revolution above or below it's easy to confirm at 100 yds.

    I have even printed charts before using the notation 4+5.5 to indicate 4 full revolutions plus another 5.5 minutes. That's a lot easier than trying to count up 29.5 minutes on a scope with 1/10 minute clicks and 6 minutes per revolution.

    My point is simply that you should develop a simple system that works for you and stick with it.

    -- richard
     
  7. updogcharmer

    updogcharmer Member

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2011
    Im not familiar with the 20 moa base, however the rail came with a picatiny rail type base on it.
    How do I know if it is 20 moa or not?
     
  8. minute of elk

    minute of elk Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    174
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2012
    110's come with a 20 moa base (there were a few that didn't, but most do). With 300 smk's you're looking at about 28 moa to get to 1000, so just about any scope out there will have enough adjustment to get you there & a beyond with or without the 20 moa base.
    I like a 100 yard zero myself since that's the easiest access I have & I do all of my load development at 100.
     
  9. budlight

    budlight Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    836
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2004
    A 20 MOA scope base is taller in the rear. Not level like a standard. Do you understand the concept? I was trying how to best describe it. Maybe someone else here is better at it. But because your scope is now mounted with an additional 20 MOA. So lets just say that you have s standard base and you site in at 200 yards and you want to shoot dead on at 600 yards because of the bullet drop you would have dial in 20 moa. Well after a certain distance your scope only has so much compensation for bullet drop.

    So with the addition scope angle you stay in the scopes range of adjustment.
     
  10. azsugarbear

    azsugarbear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,150
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2005
    You don't say what scope you have on her, but I will still give you my two cents. I like to use a 300 yard zero. I then set my zero stop (Hopefully your scope has one) to where it is dead on at 200 yds (usuall about -1.5 MOA). This means my bullet is approx. 2" high at 100 yds. So anything under 300 yds, I dial down to the zero stop and then hold dead on. Anything over 300 yds, I dial up per drop chart or ballistics program. This system works well for me.