.338 Lapua improved/Shehane rifle

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by goodgrouper, Jan 22, 2005.

  1. goodgrouper

    goodgrouper Well-Known Member

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    This is some equipment to make hitting the mark easier!
    This is a pic of the parts being used in a rifle that my uncle (brian b) and I are having Bill Shehane make for us. Thought some of you would like to see it. It should weigh in at about 60 pounds when finished. A BAT action and 34" Krieger barrel are being used. That barrel block is 9" long and 4.5 inches wide! With any luck, the 2 mile gong will be rung this spring with this setup!


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  2. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    Goodgrouper,

    Good looking pile of parts, I am sure you will be hitting steel with this rifle. Looks suprising similar to my 338 Kahn excpt I used a Rem 700 and my own 10" Barrel Bedding V-Block system which is not externally visable except for the three mounting bolt holes in the bottom of the forend.

    Let us know how she runs. Bill will do you proud. I assume you will be using the 300 gr class of VLD and ULD bullets.

    Good Shooting!!

    Kirby Allen(50)
     

  3. goodgrouper

    goodgrouper Well-Known Member

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    Fifty driver,
    Got any pics of that beast of yours? I would love to see 'em!
    Yes, we will be shooting the 300 grain MK bullet. They are cool looking bullets!
     
  4. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    Goodgrouper,

    Here are a couple pics, not the best pics but you get the idea.

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    That is a SS 16x42mm Mil Dot in the rings. I wanted to test this scope out on a serious long range rifle and so far I have been suprised at the quality of this scope. Its glass is clear, reticle is very good and the best thing it has 110 moa of vertical adjustment which will take the Kahn out to 2000 yards.

    The rifle recoiled pretty good at first so I designed this muzzle brake and fitted it to the 1.350" diameter barrel. Now recoil is in the class of a 12 lb 308 Win. Very nice, easy to spot your impacts.

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    The brake diameter is 1.450" tapered to 1.350" to match the barrel. It was machined out of a 6" section of 1.500" diameter Lilja stainless barrel scrap.

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    This is the only sing that this rifle is not a conventionally bedded rifle, the three 1/4x28 TPI mounting bolts in the bottom of the forend.

    I did not want anything disrupting the lines of the rifle so everything is hidden inside the stock. Kind of a sleeper of the V-Block rifles. The old receiver screws are dummies. Nothing touches the receiver at all.

    Good Shooting!!

    Kirby Allen(50)
     
  5. goodgrouper

    goodgrouper Well-Known Member

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    Fiftydriver,
    Wow, our guns are almost twinners! The color scheme is almost the same! How heavy is your v block?
     
  6. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    Goodgrouper, my V-block design only adds about 1/2 lb to the rifle.

    I am actually designing a "sporter V-Block" system which will be used for sporter weight big game rifles. Will keep you posted on that.

    They are almost twin stocks!!!

    Good Shooting!!

    Kirby Allen(50)
     
  7. brian b

    brian b Well-Known Member

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    Fiftydriver,
    Is your V-Block system similar to Darrel Holland's ??
    I have one of his rifles and it seems like an awesome set-up having the action floated along with the barrel ahead of the block.
    With a 1.45" barrel 34" long is a V-block as strong as a full barrel block such as the one in goodgrouper's pic. what are the advantages and disadvantages of each design??
    Thanks B
    p.s.could you re-barrel a holland V-Block rifle ?? it has a very unique contour.(life is too short to have to deal with someone as grumpy as darrel more than once)
     
  8. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    Brian B.

    Darrells not grumpy, he is just really busy!!!!

    His V-Block was one that I studied very close in designing my system. I do like his design. There are some major differences between his V-Block design and mine.

    They are:

    Teh main difference is that the Holland V-Block system uses a specially contoured barrel which fits a recoil lug and a lock nut similiar to the Savage rifle about 4" in front of the receiver face. The recoil lug on the Holland design limits barrel diameter that can be used ahead of the recoil lug to around 1 1/16". The lug also bares directly against the V-Block on its forward surface.

    This is all good except it requires a specially contoured barrel, again limited in diameter and it also requires threading the barrel not only for the receiver threads but also for the lock nut that holds the recoil lug in place.

    The holland design uses a single 1/4x28tpi bolt to hold the barreled action down in the V-Block.

    I can not find any fault with this system from a performance or accuracy stand point when used on conventional dimensioned tactical or varmint style rifles.

    Still I designed my Barrel Bedding V-Block system to allow the Rem 700 or any modern action really to be used with barrels of much larger diameter then the standard 1.250" and also up to 38" in length. This is something a conventional factory receiver simply can not do using a conventional bedding system without major receiver flexing.

    My design differs from Darrells in that I keep the recoil lug in the traditional location between the receiver and barrel. My design has the recoil lug baring against the stock with the V-Block positioned ahead of the lug.

    Also, My design uses two and even three 1/4-28 tpi mounting bolts to secure the barrel down into the V-Block. Again this is determined by the size of the barrel and the intensity of the round.

    Also, my design has no real limits on the barrel diameter that can be used although a 1.350" diameter barrel is the same diameter as a Rem 700 receiver, Anything much larger and it looks a bit odd.

    Still with this diameter, you can use a straight cylinder barrel up to 36" in length is a round with the intensity of a 338 Kahn with no barrel whip problems at all.

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    This is one of my smaller V-Block rifles. It sports a 1.250" diameter straight cylinder 30" Lilja 1-8", 3 groove chambered for the 22-6mm AI.

    Because this chambering has little recoil and the barrel is not OVERLY heavy and long, a 7" V-Block was machined with two mounting bolts.

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    This pic shows the fitted V-Block. IT is fixed to the stock using Brownells Steel Bedding compound. As you can see the area behind the recoil lug has been relieved of wood and is solid Steel bed for over 1.75" in depth. It is extremely strong and rigid.

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    The two holes on the right are for the V-Block mounting bolts. The one on the left is a dummy receiver screw that does nothing but look good!

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    Besides the bolt holes in the forend, this is the only other thing that tells this rifle is not a conventional rifle, the barrel markings.

    On my heavy rifles, I use a 10" block with three mounting screws. The width of my V-Blocks is determined by the barrel diameter.

    The design used in the pics that goodgrouper posted is a time tested system that work great as well. Really the only real disadvantage is machining time and cost.

    Also, they require the optical system to be elevated a great deal higher then either the Holland or my system.

    I see my system as a hybrid cross between Hollands V-Block and the clamp block systems.

    It has teh clean looks of the Holland, actually noticably cleaner lines, while offering the stability of the clamp design.

    My 338 Kahn for example has a 34.5" Lilja, 1.350" straight cylinder barrel and is built on a Rem 700 receiver. Even though the barrel is 34.5" long, with the first 10" of the barrel firnly supported by the V-Block, this barrel has the stiffness of a free floated 24.5" barrel with a diameter of 1.350".

    Looking at it that way it is easy to see why these rifles are so stiff and rigid and why they perform so consistantly at extreme range or even close range.

    I am also designing an Extreme Sporter V-Block system which will be used on conventional lookign rifles of sporter design and weight but with the stability of a Barrel Bedding V-Block.

    All the systems work great once finished and on the range. I just feel my system offers the highest level of performance for the machining time requires and the lower amount of machining translates into lower labor charges for equal performance.

    Each design will again produce extremely consistant long range performance. The Holland design is more suited to conventional weight Tactical and Varmint rifles where as my design and the Clamp design are better for very long and very heavy barrels.

    Good Shooting!!!!

    Kirby Allen (50)
     
  9. brian b

    brian b Well-Known Member

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    Fiftydriver,
    That was an excellent post and very informative and I can see the reasoning and the advantages of your barrel block system.
    when does a gun project get to the point that you suggest a V-Block in a customers gun?? and the only question that you did not more than answer is can you re-barrel my Holland V-Block or is it too much of a pain?? (I know you must like Darrel because you use his brakes and such and he does do very quality work,but for the average JOE like me his CANKER ASS attitude takes the fun out of it)
    Thanks for your time and help
    B
     
  10. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    Brian B,

    Generally, when I hear my customers start talking about +30" barrels with diameters over 1.250" I instantly recommend the V-Block.

    Also, Someone wanting the absolute in accuracy and rigidity in a rifle for any use I always tell my customers about thsi system.

    It really is not needed with a barrel of 30" or less and a muzzle diameter of 1.000" or less. Some rifles can use a 1.250" straight cylinder barrel up to 30" in length if a relatively mild round is used. But if you start driving a VLD or ULD bullet down the barrel that is 1.5" in length with a bullet weight of 200 to 300 gr at +3000 fps, barrel whip will be an issue and this is the design goal of this system. To offer performance that the 700 and other factory actions could never reach without this system.

    I will admit that I also like my rifles to be clean looking. There is nothing better then setting up a rifle that looks like a big but otherwise conventional rifle and punching 1/4 moa groups at 1500 yards. Really will get some attention from onlookers.

    You get the same quality using the Clamp Block system but when you unpack that beast everyone knows whats under the hood if you will. I like to build "sleeper" rifles.

    As far as the Holland V-Block. It is not a problem at all to rebarrel this system. Only thing is you need a barrel built to the contour used with this V-Block.

    Holland uses only Pac-Nor Super Match barrels for his V-Blocks and as far as I know, Pac-Nor is the only barrel maker building barrels to this contour.

    I believe Lilja would build barrels to this contour if I got Dan the specs and paid the special contour price.

    Fitting a barrel for the Holland System is spendier then a conventional rebarreling job or even one for my V-Block simply because of the two threading operations needed on these barrels.

    So to answer your question, yes they can be rebarreled.

    Good Shooting!!

    Kirby Allen(50)