.338 for first rifle?

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by Weidah, Apr 3, 2011.

  1. Weidah

    Weidah Member

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    First of all, hi my name is Tom and I'm from Europe. I've already had some e-mail exchange with Shawn, but was holding back with all the questions because I didn't want to bother him with them.

    I'm going to start hunting and do some long range target shooting. I haven't even started on my license and haven't got much knowledge about firearms.

    I've done quite a bit research about what I want from a rifle, and what I want the most is accuracy at long range and quality. I want it to last, and so I won't feel like I want to upgrade to something "better" after time. Just after a few searches on Google I kept seeing .338 Edge popup (besides .338 Lapua) I thought there must be something about it that makes it so popular. The reviews about the cartridge and rifles just made me keep searching for it on Youtube and anywhere I could see some action.


    So what do you guys think? Is it the right choice?


    If yes, what would you suggest for the parts?


    What are the actual parts you have to look for when building a custom rifle?

    I have no idea what an action is or if its made out of any other components. I can't really translate it to my language since any translator would do a direct translation and I know it's not right.

    The stock, I guess, would fit any combination, or not? I'll probably go with a stock with a cheek piece and that isn't too heavy.

    And the barrel. Does it need to be specifically made for the .338 Edge or does it just have to be the right size for a .338 bullet? I'm thinking about a 30" barrel with a 10" twist and getting it fluted to save on weight and it looks amazing from what I've seen.
    Is there a way that the muzzle breaker is already attached to the rifle as a part of it or do I have to order it separately. If so what kind?

    Here my knowledge stops, I don't even know if there's anything else (besides scopes, and accessories) that one would need to build a working rifle, so I can't ask the question.


    And what do I do after I get the list of things I need? Do I just take the list to a gunsmith and he orders the parts? Or can I order the parts from the US and bring them to him.

    Do I need to be careful about anything, parts etc.


    I know I'm making it look like rocket science, I'm sorry about that :)

    That's about it, for that part.


    If anyone feels like it, he can also write down an awesome list of components one would use for a rifle. Not single shot please :)


    And the dies for the .338 edge, I guess they fit any reloading machine right? Also have to get a reloading license here so I guess I'll learn more about that there :)



    Thanks for your time. I hope you could answer some of the questions and you won't mind if I will have any more.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2011
  2. MTBULLET

    MTBULLET Well-Known Member

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    don't know where in Eruope you are, but almost every country has some kind of shooting club. i would recommend you join or vist several and look at rifles and talk to shooters before you decide. Most of europe as I know it would not require the range that the .338 group can reach. Good luck, and again, go talk to some resident shooters, it will save you money and grief in the long run.
     

  3. Ian B

    Ian B Well-Known Member

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    I am going to be honest with you The .338 mags like the laupa and edge are in no way shape or form a good round for you for a lot of reasons.
    They are really expensive to shoot they have way to much recoil for a beginner and are in general pretty big guns.
    The edge is more for someone who know the ins and outs of reloading to its not something you can just go to the store and buy and its not something to tinker with if have never reloaded before its dangerous for you to try.

    You should start out with a .22 LR learn the basics of marksmanship and work your way in to full sized rifle rounds that are common and cheap like .308 .243
    with those you can start steeping up the ranges and you can begin to learn how to adjust your scope and read the wind make range cards and even learn on to reload.

    Most every one here learned how to shoot growing up myself included with .22s then deer rifles no one here learned how to shoot on big .338 mags.

    LRH is not Something for someone who has never shot a gun before it takes alot of practices and time to be able to develop your skills to the point where one has the confidence to take a shot at an animal at 1000+ yards let alone even hit something that far away regardless of the equipment you are using.
     
  4. Oliveralan

    Oliveralan Well-Known Member

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    Based on all he licenses required, sounds like your from my home country of Germany! Or maybe rest of Europe has also become as regulated...

    More important than having a big rifle is practice and experience. You cannot just build one gun as a be all end all. They are tools, it's like trying to build a car with a hammer, and deciding because you Only want one hammer your getting a BIG one. For starters a .308 Winchester is a good place to start. That will give you thousands of
    rounds to practice with, but also able to take game to 600yards or more in light to medium wind.

    A long range hunting rifle is an extremely specialized piece of equipment. You will not want to learn to shoot with a 338 edge. Cost alone justifies building a practice rig, with the cost of reloading components in Europe, you'll be far better off building a 308, .260 Remington, 6.5x47 Lapua, 7mm-08, something in that range with 3000rounds plus of barrel life.

    Also joining a shooting club is an excellent idea, taking shooting classes an even better one!
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2011
  5. CRNA

    CRNA Well-Known Member

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    I have shot/hunted my entire life. I first started with shooting 22LR like many on here at age four. I am now 34 and I just recently decided to hop on the long range bandwagon. I opted for a 7mmRM for several reasons. My logic is: 1) recoil from an unbraked 7mmRM is about my limit. Anything above that and I would desire a muzzle break to prevent crushing recoil. 2) This caliber will take any animal that I may ever have the opportunity to take at any distance that I would feel comfortable shooting. 2) The cost of handloading is not as bad as a caliber that requires much more powder, and in doesn't require lots of brass manipulation as a 338 edge would. 3) My factory Savage with a match barrel gives me all of the accuracy that I desire. I didn't have to piece together a gun (or have it build by a smith, which is expensive at best).
    I personally think buying a 338 edge for a first gun is much like buying a Ferrari for a first car. I don't think that you will be able to make it perform to it's potential because you don't have the experience. I would suggest that before you drop the money on a cannon like an edge, you shoot some rifles and see what they feel like. It would be very easy to develop a terrible flinch from a big rifle if you are not used to it, even if you are a seasoned shooter. As others have suggested, I would start with a 22LR, and work on your marksmanship. If you are not willing to take it that slow at first, then a .243 Winchester would be the absolute biggest caliber that I would even consider for a first rifle. Good luck with your search.
     
  6. Weidah

    Weidah Member

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    Oliveralan:

    Slovenia actually :)

    And did you mean 3000 rounds for the barrel life, Oliveralan?


    Thanks for all your replies


    .22 LR, looks like something we call a Flobert, not sure if it's the same thing.


    Ok I'll go either with that or a bit bigger round. I really like some of the Remington models but don't know about the quality, I read some random bad stuff about them. Does Remington even have a rifle in .22?

    Oliveralan: how hard would it be to import a Remington into Europe?





    Thanks again for all your replies, I'll definitely go for one of the ones you recommended.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2011
  7. Oliveralan

    Oliveralan Well-Known Member

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    I don't know how difficult an import would be, if I was to import from the US, I would definitely get a savage. Factory remitting are not as accurate has factory savages. Savages also have better triggers.
     
  8. zkodiak

    zkodiak Well-Known Member

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    I was just wondering if you have thought about other caliber's to start with. I think everyone should have a smaller caliber also. Maybe start with something like a 308 or a short mag. Most with the right bullets choice will reach out there a long ways. While helping build good shoot form and learning with a big gun can have it's cost. Like recoil sensitive..
     
  9. Weidah

    Weidah Member

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    I'm open to options right now. Something to learn the basics on and maybe be a centerfire rifle. Id like to learn to reload my ammo aswell in the future before upgrading.

    Also any optics you guys would recomend for a beginner rifle? Something that will help me with when Im learning ballistics, has turrets that are not covered, for quick setup. Something like the NF scopes have, when you can just turn the turret without unscrewing a cap and MIL Dots aswell. But not overkill ofc.


    Again thanks for your replies, and for being so tolerant.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2011
  10. Ian B

    Ian B Well-Known Member

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    Zivijo

    Sorry thats about all the Slovenian I know The original owner of my house was from Slovenia I am probably the only person in the U.S with a kozolec haha.


    Now about importing a Remington to your country I dont know Slovenias laws its different in every country so you will have to ask a local gun shop owner about that.
    If Remington is not already imported to your country it will most likely be really hard to get one imported if not impossible.


    If Remington does not import to your country you have a lot of other choices for guns that are made in Europe alot of them are actually better than Remington by along shot some examples would be.

    CZ, FN, Sako, Zastava, Steyr there is more but the list would go on for a while.

    Those are all top notch guns I personally use FN and CZ guns alot.

    CZ makes a nice 22lr called the CZ 452.

    As far as scopes go its better to get a good one but they come at high prices.
    Look in to some of the offerings by Zeiss and IOR valdada they both make scopes with exposed target turrets you will have to find one in your price range and one that is practical for your use.
     
  11. Weidah

    Weidah Member

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    Živjo.

    Nice to see you know some Slovene, did you just pickup some words or do you know Slovene?


    Anyways on topic.


    I'm probably gonna go for a .22 LR as the rounds are really cheap and I can have some fun with it and learn the basics.

    About the scope, I'll check on the ones you recommended. Is there anything specific I have to look for in a scope for a .22LR? Also I wear glasses if that makes any difference.
     
  12. CRNA

    CRNA Well-Known Member

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    I think you will be really happy that you took it slow in the beginning. There is so much more to good shooting than a huge magnum caliber rifle. I think once you spend a little time with a small bore rifle and learn the basics of shooting and most importantly safety, you will be glad you did. If you went with a 338 you would also be taking a big plunge in the reloading learning curve. I could see it being very frustrating for a beginner. Good luck with your shooting.
     
  13. LR3

    LR3 Well-Known Member

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    I d recommend trying 6mm savage for learning technique, fun, cost of ammo, accuracy and not developing a flinch. Can be accurate o 1000 and teaches you to read wind. Nfs 5.5-22 good scope or if you plan to get a 338 edge or 338/408 consider a 5-25 S&B.
     
  14. Weidah

    Weidah Member

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    I kinda made my mind up that I'll be getting a 22lr and I got my eye on a nice CZ with a synthetic stock, like the look :). But I'll do some research on the 6mm and prices for guns and rounds. Savage is not that common here and it takes months for it to arrive though.


    About the scope, I haven't done much research on them, but just yesterday I found a nice Zeiss scope and found that it's parallax free 100y. Not ideal for a rimfire I think. Looking for a 3x or 4x with Mil-dot or maybe a 3-9x but has to have a parallax adjustment. Someone suggested a Bushnell scope but at 80€ I think that's kinda cheap.


    Thanks for your reply.