30mm vs 1" tube....what the deal?

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by mfloski, Jan 28, 2011.

  1. mfloski

    mfloski Active Member

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    What are the pros and cons of each and your opinions?
     
  2. Camshaft

    Camshaft Well-Known Member

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    30mm
    pro: More elevation and windage travel. More light transmission.
    Con: weight

    1"
    Pro: weight
    Con: Elevation and windage travel.
     

  3. BillR

    BillR Well-Known Member

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    The only real difference between the two is the number of clicks that the erector set allows you. And the fact that the 30MM tube is a bit stiffer maybe. As far as transmitting more light the answer to that one is NO. Sorry Camshaft, didn't mean to step on your toes on that one but its the truth. Some company's out there say it does but if you do some real studying on it you will find out tube size has nothing to do with light transmission.
     
  4. Hicks

    Hicks Well-Known Member

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    Jeez, that looks like my dad's rifle. I thought it got stolen for a sec.

    Hicks
     
  5. Lapua guy

    Lapua guy Well-Known Member

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    Pretty much it. THough I will say what you gain in the 30mm in pros, far outweighs the cons.
     
  6. Lapua guy

    Lapua guy Well-Known Member

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    Could you cite those companies please? I have heard people claim that, but not companies. I could be wrong, but I think that is more important for transmitting light than objective size is. Might explain why there are so many crappy scope companies out there too.
     
  7. BillR

    BillR Well-Known Member

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    Not going to name any company's that claim that it does as that isn't hard to find out by reading but I have to study every bit of the spec's on scopes for a living so I can advise people. I try to keep my business life separate from my online life so I will leave it at that. :)
    The reason that a lot of company's are going to the larger tube is so they can get more elevation in them as Long Range Shooters are demanding it and demand is what drives the market or we would still be using mostly 1" scopes.
    Two things will improve light transference. One is the size of the objective bell and the lenses in that area has the major part in light transference.
    The next part that contributes to light transference is the lenses coatings and whether their coated inside and out or just one side. This is also a lot/some of the difference between cheaper scopes and higher priced scopes.
    Also some eyes as they get older (mine :) ) cannot see more light than some of the smaller objective bells can give you. I have a hard time telling the difference between a 50 and a 56MM and always figured it was imagined as without knowing which is which I cannot tell.
    Now all that said a 1" can be just as bright as a 30 or even a 34MM tube depending on the size of the bell and coatings. OH and the quality of the scopes glass too. :)
    Another thing I see that really blows my mind is some scope company's really blow their numbers on light transference way over what it actually is. Sit down sometime and start reading the actual spec's on a scope. Once you understand them it will start to open your eyes a bit so to speak.
     
  8. benchracer

    benchracer Well-Known Member

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    The 30mm tube makes a big difference in field of view (low magnification doesn't hurt either).

    This year I took a deer at 12 yards. I was using a Meopta 1.5-6x42 with a 30mm tube. Even at 12 yards, I could still see the entire deer right to the moment that I took the shot.

    I am pretty sure that I would have had trouble making a shot that close with my usual 1" tube American spec scopes.

    For Long Range Hunting, that may be a quality of limited usefulness, but it is something to consider.