300 win mag muzzle break

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by mrbofus, Nov 15, 2012.

  1. mrbofus

    mrbofus Well-Known Member

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    Greetings,

    Let me start by saying I have heard many times that if you need a break you need a different rifle.
    Well, I have a Remington 300 win mag, shooting 180 gr handloads very well except for after the 4th-5th round the flinches start. I have replaced the plastic stock with an older thumbhole which helped noticably.

    My questions is: What type of recoil suppression is available in the way of muzzle breaks? And is there any product avaible that isnt SO DANG LOUD!

    I have shot a 300 with a break, very managable except for the ear part. I have resisted putting a break on because of the excess noise and blast.

    Or do I just need to cowboy up and shoot it?

    At 6'2" and 170lbs it is kind of punishing, my father is 6' and about 285 and it does not bother him a bit, but short of gaining 100 lbs what else can I do?

    Thanks and great forum here.
     
  2. mugzzzee

    mugzzzee Active Member

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    Welcome to the forum! Great place and a lot of knowleable people. I have a 300 win mag being built as we speak. I am having a removeable muzzle break installed so I can decide under what circumstances to use the break. ou might want to consider that. Just a thought. Good luck....
     

  3. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to LRH and enjoy!

    Regardless of muzzle brake you install, it is going to be loud, unless you go with a suppressor which are very bulky and pricey ... + you'll have to pay extra license for owning one.

    There are plenty of effective muzzle brakes and hearing protection in the market.

    Good luck!

    Ed
     
  4. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    Here is the JP brake I use on my 300 win and love.
    JP - Compensators - Bennie Cooley Signature Series

    I feel it is not as loud as some. I do not wear hearing protection in the field, but probably should. But then we all should while shooting any rifle braked or not right?

    I think a lot of the bad press came from the early design radial brakes. Like the Vais. That brake is the rudest brake I have ever shot behind. Loud, and a wave of felt percussion along with a huge dirt cloud while prone. The newer side discharge brakes are much better.

    Jeff
     
  5. D.ID

    D.ID Well-Known Member

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    Recoil is subjective. My hunting partner and my wife are both heavier than I am but both feel the 270 is a lot of recoil, they both enjoy shooting my 338 edge with a brake. I think the 338 win hardly kicks. Just a different perspective regardless of weight. The walkers game ear costs about $130 and should be considered in the pros and cons of putting a brake on. On the pro side......they both have trouble shooting any cartridges above a 270 without a brake but have no trouble even with heavy loaded magnums with the brake. My wife could not hold a 12" group at 400yrds with a 270 until we put a brake on it. With a brake 4" easy. She can bust a 2" pebble at 750yrds with my edge shooting 300grainers. If recoil and or flinch is an issue and you want to continue to shoot a heavy caliber..........Don't fight it, just put a brake on it and invest in a game ear.
     
  6. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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  7. Biggs300

    Biggs300 Well-Known Member

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    I have a Browning X-Bolt 300 WM Stainless Stalker that kicks like a mule. If I'm shooting more than 12 or 15 rounds from the bench, I use a Past Pad. Yeah, I'm a whoosie. I've taken several deer with mine and never remember feeling the recoil. I'll take a bit of recoil over the noise that a muzzle break creates anytime.
     
  8. shortpants

    shortpants Well-Known Member

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    First, welcome to the site!

    Second to anyone who says man up and shoot it with no brake I say man up and stop being a wuss about a little noise. You should always have your ear protection in anyway. I've never heard of someone increasing their accuracy by removing their brake but it is a fact that by reducing recoil you will improve your accuracy.

    As jeff stated the side ported or baffled style brakes are better (at least in our opinion). There are several offered by sponsors of this site that are all very nice. Holland, Defencive Edge, Muscle Brake... There are a few more as well.
     
  9. D.ID

    D.ID Well-Known Member

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    +1................
     
  10. mrbofus

    mrbofus Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the input,
    I agree that ear protection should and is always used at the range, seldom in the field. I do not ever remember feeling the recoil or even thinking about it when shooting at a deer or elk. The main reason for asking is for recreational, bench, practice shooting. Just to make it a bit more enjoyable when there isnt a critter in the scope.

    I will look into some of the suggested brakes and has anyome ever used or seen those "Blackhawk Recoil Reducing " rifle stocks that look tactical?
    Do the work at all?

    Thanks again for the input, hopefully get some shooting time this weekend.
     
  11. D.ID

    D.ID Well-Known Member

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    The hearing protection will be required even in the field if it still has the brake on it when your hunting. The game ear enhances regular noise but cancels out dangerous noise and they really work great. For me and my crew it makes more cents than putting the brake on and off...................... I tried the blackhawk stock for my wife before trying an expensive radial brake which was loud and lousy for recoil reduction and then finely finding satisfaction $500 later with a Ross Shuler's $40-50 baffle brake. The blackhawk stock was intolerable to us as it allows the scoped action to jump back at you under recoil and close the eye relief gap. We found this so distracting that we quickly abandoned the concept and sold the stock. Your milage may vary but I really can't recommend it for a scoped rifle.
     
  12. mrbofus

    mrbofus Well-Known Member

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    Yes I agree that with or with out a brake hearing protection should always be used. I seldom use it when hunting (even when i know I should) but definetly would with a rifle with a brake on it, and am finding myself using some form of protection in the field as the years go by.
    As to the Blackhawk stock, that was one concern I had about the scope so i believe I will scrape that idea and look more into the brakes.
    Thanks
     
  13. reeldawg

    reeldawg Well-Known Member

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    I put one on my Rem 700 300 WM, My 14 year old son and 12 year old daughter can shoot it it with out issue. I put a removable brake on it and very rarely shoot it without it.
     
  14. jpeck

    jpeck Member

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    Another alternative, if you want to stay away from a break, would be a comp stock. Love mine on 300 WM, reduces recoil dramatically. Less recoil than .308.