.270 vs .280

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Dave Schenck, Nov 13, 2011.

  1. Dave Schenck

    Dave Schenck Well-Known Member

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    Hi Guys - you fellars must be looking forward to the hunting season. Over here we are approaching summer and idle minds turn to things like maintenance and new stuff!
    My .270 is slowly showing signs of a tired barrel. Before jump in and sticj a new .270 barrel on, is there any real merit in changing it for a .280? I jave about a 1000 bullets and plenty brass for the .270 but the .280 seems to offer something more. Is it enough to make a change? I am happy with the .270 so I need to know if the .280 does enough to warrant a change!
     
  2. Sully2

    Sully2 Well-Known Member

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    rebarrel the .270 and either buy a new .280 or have one built.

    ??? Where is "over here"??
     

  3. Dave Schenck

    Dave Schenck Well-Known Member

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    E Cape in South Africa! Hunting paradise!
     
  4. liltank

    liltank Well-Known Member

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    The 280 has a larger selection of high BC bullets. But the new Matrix bullets have turned the 270 into a good shooter as well. Either will do what you need it too.

    Tank
     
  5. 25 Otter

    25 Otter Well-Known Member

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    Not in my mind. The 270 has obviously served you well. Long enough to need a new pipe anyway. That leads me to think you rarley need the heavier bullets the 280 can offer. Buy the highest quality barrel blank you can afford. Choose a smith that maybe has some bench rest rifles to his credit. (These guys are usually the fussiest about bore axis,reamer dimensions and the good old pride in workmanship thing) If you liked the 270 in the past you will love it with a true precision barrel. If you feel the need for the heavier pills,you might just as well go 30/06. I've had bothand the 280 is a great round,but...... Your 270 will likely handle the 160 gr bullets well. Provided it isn't a 12" twist. Beyond that in the 280 you are looking at a 175 as the uper limits for bullet weight. Realisticly anyway. At least the old 30-otter will widen your selection to include the 180 through 220gr stuff. No Sir,if it were me I'd be looking for a new barrel in .277 with a 10" twist. Krieger,Bartlein and Shilen can all take care of it for you.
     
  6. Alfred Crouch

    Alfred Crouch Well-Known Member

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    Fully agree with 25 Otter. Put a good 270 barrel on it and keep hunting. The difference between the two is negligible. You already have all the goodies for the 270. The 270 is old, tried, proven and so dependable until it is boring.
     
  7. Dave Schenck

    Dave Schenck Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Gents - you have confirmed my thinking! Had I been busy with a new build I might have gone the .280 route but I have had great service with a .270 and will certainly look to rebarrel. I will go and check the twist but know my rifle stabilises 130gr very well but not 150gr - perhaps a 10 twist os the answer and then shoot the heavier stuff. I have been very happy with the 130gr offerings so here I must thingk carefully.
     
  8. Tom Brush

    Tom Brush Well-Known Member

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    Several years ago my wife and I were on a sightseeing trip thru the west. We were headed to Jackson Wyoming from Utah. I saw a large herd of antelope and stopped to film them. After several minutes I heard a shot and saw an antelope stagger. The rest of the herd took off. Soon another shot was fired and the antelope fell.

    I looked around and did not see anybody. Soon someone stood up way down in the sage. I remembered that I had passed an access road so I turned around and went down to talk to the hunter. He told me that he shot the antelope at 732 yds. His first shot hit it a little low so he fired the second shot. I looked at his rifle and it was a Remington ADL synthetic (Wal-Mart special) in .280 with a target scope on it. He said that he had shot another antelope the weekend before at over 600 yds. He had his own range and practiced out to 1000 yds. I told him that the shot was amazing with a sporter .280 remington. He looked at me and said "this isn't my long range rifle. My long range rifle is the same model only a .270."

    Being born and raised in Williamsport, PA and surrounded by 1000 yd. shooters who shot heavy benchrest rifles I was truly impressed.

    Tom