264 Win Mag can some one explain why it flattens boat tails?

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by ICANHITHIMMAN, Aug 15, 2011.

  1. ICANHITHIMMAN

    ICANHITHIMMAN Well-Known Member

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    So I was talking with a guy at work and he was telling be that beacuse of the 264 win mag is considered a "overbore" round that it will flatten the boat tails of all bullets so he only shoots flat base bullets?

    I'm sure some one else has heard this or maybe seen it I dont know it was news to me I would like to here more as I have a barrled action sitting in the gun safe and was planning on using 140g VLDs.

    Jon
     
  2. Edd

    Edd Well-Known Member

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    I haven't heard that but I have heard something similar. I heard about a rabbit that,one day a year, hops all around country leaving candy for all the kids.
     

  3. Oliveralan

    Oliveralan Well-Known Member

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    That's a load of crap. I shoot a 6.5-300 win mag, which is a good bit bigger than the .264 win mag, ive chronoed 140VLDs at up to 3555fps and had them go were they are supposed to.
     
  4. liltank

    liltank Well-Known Member

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    I'm no genius, but I can almost bet my rifle that boat tails don't flatten due to pressure. Sounds like he had a bad go of it with BT bullets and has been able to tune flat base easier.

    Tank
     
  5. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    no. no.
     
  6. LouBoyd

    LouBoyd Well-Known Member

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    "overbore" doesn't mean high pressure. You can of course load any cartridge to give excessive pressure. That's dumb as doing so will damage the action. At reasonable pressures however an "overbore" cartridge will give reduced barrel throat life. Throat erosion takes place as the temperature of the surface of the metal in the barrel throat approaches the melting point of the barrel steel. That's primarily a a function of the bore diameter (normal) , the pressure (and hence the temperature) of the propellant gas (normal) , and the duration of the propellant flow which will be longer than cartridges with smaller case capacity. . I can't think of any reason a 264 WM should damage boattail bullets, and I've never seen evidence that it does in the bullets I shoot. I'm not saying it can't happen. I'd like to see photos of the recoverd bullets. It might tell if the damage was from pressure, jacket melting, or the result of impact at the target.

    Some other "overbore" factory cartridges include the 223 WSSM,, the 7mm Rem Ultra Mag and the 30-378 Weatherby Magnum. There are a number of severely overbore wildcat cartridges. I own two 264 Win Mags. One is a pre-64 "featherweight" Win 70 with a 22" barrel The other is Rem 700 F Class target rifle with a 28" Pac-Nor heavy barrel. They are as different as night and day in their characteristics.

    The only thing wrong with overbore cartridges is reduced barrel life. Why own an overbore rifle? It's because they can have superior performance in windy conditions with low drag bullets. Smaller cartridges (or larger bores) are usually superior when wind deflection uncertainty is not the limiting accuracy factor. Personally I don't mind buying barrels occasionally to get high performance. Barrels are not the major expense of shooting a 264 Win Mag or a 223 WSSM or a 30-378 Wby. Ammunition is even if it's handloaded.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2011
  7. Tikkamike

    Tikkamike Well-Known Member

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    that is awesome. i was thinking the same thing
     
  8. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    How do guys come up with this stuff ?

    If you walk around in a horse corral you can find the same thing on your boots.

    And the only way I know that you can flatten the boat tail is to load it backwards and when it
    hits, the the boat tail will flatten.

    I hope he is not your doctor or financial advisor !!!!

    All I can say Is "You cant fix stupid"

    J E CUSTOM
     
  9. Aldon

    Aldon Well-Known Member

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    The answer as mentioned a few times is no.

    But have the fellow buy Litz's book and do some self study rather than debate it.
     
  10. ICANHITHIMMAN

    ICANHITHIMMAN Well-Known Member

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    Thanks to everyone who commented. It didnt seam right to me but he was convinced and so was another fellow. I didnt say anything more than I had never seen or heard anything like that before.

    He is no doctor, lol just an avarage guy a pip fitter strongest man I have ever met he wasent being a dick at all just didnt seam right and I just met him so I didnt want to flat out say um gosh that sounds crazy before asking the combined intelegence of LRH.

    Thanks to all

    Jon
     
  11. MHO

    MHO Well-Known Member

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    JE Custom, LMAO. Very true. And regarding this post, NO NO NO.
     
  12. RT2506

    RT2506 Well-Known Member

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    The only flattening a BT (130 gr Nosler Accubond) bullet does in my 264 Win mag is flatten the trajectory. At 3350 fps muzzle velocity it shoots like a stretched string. :D
     
  13. Boss Hoss

    Boss Hoss Well-Known Member

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    Hahahahaha--that is a good one! Got a chuckle out of that!!!!
     
  14. Varminator 911

    Varminator 911 Well-Known Member

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    The reason it doesn't flatten the base is because the pressure is just as great on the sides of the boattail as on the base. It you put a flat-nose, bore-size slug behind the bullet, the boattail would be flat as a pancake. That would be the case for a Berger VLD. Another bullet like a Barnes TTSX that's solid copper couldn't be flattened even with a slug behind.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2011