243 Win. 85 gr. or 100 gr.

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by Teamroper, Aug 19, 2009.

  1. Teamroper

    Teamroper Member

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    I need a little help here. I have a Model 70, 243 Win. w/4x-12x40 scope. I hunt whitetails and coyotes with it. Maximun distance on either one would be 400 yds and more than likely less than 300 yds. I am going to stick to the 85gr. or the 100 gr. at the present time just due to the availabililty at any gun store. What grain would be the most versatile and what would you sight it in for? And last, is there a possiblilty of using BOTH bullets and just switch them out for whatever game I am after?:rolleyes:
     
  2. trebark

    trebark Well-Known Member

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    I think the 100 grain would be most versatile. The reason is shooting at deer at 400. I don't have my ballistic software right here, but I'm inclined to think that 400 would be at the outside limit of the 100grain bullet in the 243 when shooting deer.

    Shooting at yotes is a different story. With the 100grain pills, you could shoot well past 400 yards on yotes.

    You have couple of routes to go here:

    1. Sight-in for 100 yards, then dial your scope for the range of your intended target.

    2. Sight-in for point blank range. That is to say, a deer has an 8" kill zone. You would need to find the distance where your bullet neither rises nor falls more than 4". That way, if a deer steps inside that range, you know you can hold dead-on and hit him in the vitals. Beyond the point blank range you would have to hold over or dial for the distance. My guess is that your sight-in distance would be around 250 yards.

    3. Knowing that your point blank range is probably in the 250 yard range, I would just sight-in for 200 then dial the distance of any longer shots. I would go this route because you will probably find that your point blank range is some odd number like 238 or 263 and most drop charts are in increments of 25 or 50 yards. With a 200 yard zero, it makes it easy to dial the distance based on your drop chart.

    This is all about knowing the trajectory of any given load in your rifle. You can easily have both cartridges sitting next to your rifle and drop in the one you want for the game you're going to shoot. Then refer to the appropriate drop chart for making the shot.

    My recommendation would be to simply find the 100grain load that shoots well in your rifle and go with that. Then get to know that load inside and out. So regardless of whether it's a deer or a yote, you are confident in placing the shot.

    Have fun.
     

  3. azsugarbear

    azsugarbear Well-Known Member

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    I'm just shooting from the hip here, but I am not sure the Win Model 70 can stabilize the 100 gr. bullet. If memory serves me correct (and it fails me more often with each passing year), the model 70 barrel has a 1:10 twist. If this is in fact the case, stability may be tough to achieve and hold with a 100 gr. bullet. The Remington 7 and 700 models come with a 1:9.3 twist and I have been able to confirm on this site that there are others out there that can stabilize a 95 gr. bullet and some will even stabilize the 105 gr bullet, although the shooters readily admit it is pushing it to the limit.

    Berger's website suggests a 1:9 twist rate for their 95. gr bullet; a 1:8 twist for the 105 gr.; and a 1:7 twist for their 115 gr VLD's. On the other hand, the Lilja barrel website suggests that a 1:10 twist is sufficient to stabilize a 100 gr. bullet. In the end, it may come down to the profile and design of the bullet itself, more than just the weight alone. I would buy a box of the 100 gr. and experiment. It may be that your best round (accuracy) will be in the 80-85 gr. class of bullet.
     
  4. trebark

    trebark Well-Known Member

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    That's a good point. I was operating under the assumption that the barrel could stabilize the bullet. My understanding is that the 'standard' bullet for the 243 is a 95-100 grain bullet. It would take a 9 twist to stabilize a bullet that heavy.
     
  5. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    i have shot nearly 250 coyotes and 21 deer with the 243. i have a sako .they come with a 10 twist and shoot the 100 grain bullets just fine. i have used a lot of different bullet weights for coyotes and deer. the 85 sierra bthp, 100 horn and the 95 partition.
     
  6. fireroad

    fireroad Well-Known Member

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    Yes, bbl twist makes a difference in 95-100 gr loads. If you notice Nosler makes the partition in both the 95 gr and 100 gr depending on if you have a 1:9 or 1:10.

    My personal favorite in the .243 is the Sierra Game King 85 gr. High BC like a BT, but holds together like and AB. Second choice would be either the 95 gr partition or BT, which ever your gun shoots better.
     
  7. Teamroper

    Teamroper Member

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    Thanks for all the info. I am headed for the gun shop now to get some shells. :D
     
  8. old_heli_logger

    old_heli_logger Well-Known Member

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    Thumbs-up on the Sierra GameKing 85gr. HPBT's...for 400 yards and less.
    Good luck!
     
  9. fireroad

    fireroad Well-Known Member

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    Shells are for shotguns :D ....brass and bullets work much better in a 243gun)
     
  10. Teamroper

    Teamroper Member

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    Actually I am going to get both. I need shells and bullets. I had a coyote about run over me and he actually kicked dirt on me trying to get away. So I am going to get some SHELLS for my shotgun. Thanks for the correction. It has taken me a little time for my heart rate to come back down after that episode. Gotta love it though. :D
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2009
  11. fireroad

    fireroad Well-Known Member

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    Good deal, glad you know I was just poking fun :D. Those close encounters with yotes really get your heart pumping. I've got some federal tactical from a law enforcement buddy that I take bird hunting for those situations. Hey said they train to 100 yards with it and has taken a yote on the run at 125 yds. Happy shootin!
     
  12. swampshooter

    swampshooter Member

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    I would suggest that you buy a box of both 85gr. and 100gr. and let your rifle decide which one it likes. The differences in velocity, trajectory and killing power won't amount to much, especially after you learn how your rifle shoots. Good luck gun)
     
  13. fireroad

    fireroad Well-Known Member

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    +1 for good advice. Soon you'll be like the rest of us, with a shelf full of bullets we never shoot cause our rifles found something "better".
     
  14. Chopaka81

    Chopaka81 Well-Known Member

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    For me there is no question all when hunting deer is in the equation. Go with a 100gr bullet.

    My personal choice is a Sierra 100gr SBT pushed to 3000 fps out of my Ruger #1 chambered in 6mm Rem (26"bbl).

    My brother's daughter once took down a nice 3pt mule deer at 285 yds using a 18"bbl'd Rem M600 in 6mm Rem. He has had outstanding results using Rem 100gr PSP core-loc factory load, so much so that he does not bother to reload for the rifle.

    Ashley is a great shot and she loves that beat up old 6mm. We have tried to get her to upgrade to a 257 WBY and she refuses to switch rifles. I even offer to paint the vangaurd's stock pink. She declined and responded, "how about painting the stock of the Mohawk?"

    That girl is hell on wheels (for mulies) with that 6mm Rem and 100gr Rem factory loads.