.243 for less recoil?

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by Triggernosis, Mar 12, 2007.

  1. Triggernosis

    Triggernosis Well-Known Member

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    I'm considering getting a new rifle in .243 caliber to help with recoil. My .270 A-Bolt kicks the pure living crap outta me (on the bench - never notice it when hunting). I fired 40 rounds at the range yesterday and my shoulder still hurts from it.
    Would a .243 really be noticeably better regarding recoil? I'm talking with approx. the same weight rifle.
     
  2. AJ Peacock

    AJ Peacock Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    ...
    Would a .243 really be noticeably better (than a .270Win) regarding recoil? I'm talking with approx. the same weight rifle.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    It would with factory ammo. You can load the 270 down to .243 levels if you chose to. You could add weight to the 270 to lower the perceived recoil.

    How does the .270 fit you? What type of recoil pad is on it? A good magnum style recoil pad can help a lot as well.

    What type of shooting are you doing? Paper mostly, deer, larger game? The 270 is a great cartridge and so is the .243. For game larger than deer it is my opinion that the 270 is head and shoulders better. Even for deer at longer ranges, the 270 is superior.

    Don't take this post as being biased. I don't own a .270 (but I've been around them). I do own a .243 and know its limitations. Even a light .243 with hot loads and a stiff/non-existant recoil pad can be painful for some people.

    Hope this helps,
    Don
     

  3. Triggernosis

    Triggernosis Well-Known Member

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    Don,
    I'm primarily a whitetail deer hunter, with pronghorns in the future plans.
    I'm trying to shoot more paper to get better at longer ranges for hunting.
    Rifle fits well now, magnum Pachmayr pad installed, also increasing l.o.p. for my long arms. Also have a leather cheek pad on it to keep my head up for proper sight picture.

    From what you've told me, I'd probably be better off getting me some reduced recoil loads for the .270 and practice with them. Trouble is - I like to practice with what I'm gonna hunt with.
     
  4. pinshootr

    pinshootr Well-Known Member

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    Rather than changing calibers get yourself a good shooting rest with a pocket for the butt of the gun and just shoot with it when practicing. Takes most of the recoil, and you can shoot all day with out hurting your shoulder or worse developing a flinch!! Tod
     
  5. Triggernosis

    Triggernosis Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    or worse developing a flinch!! Tod

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Mmmhmm, I believe I'm too late as I'm afraid that's already happened, my friend.
     
  6. AJ Peacock

    AJ Peacock Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Don,
    I'm primarily a whitetail deer hunter, with pronghorns in the future plans.
    I'm trying to shoot more paper to get better at longer ranges for hunting.
    Rifle fits well now, magnum Pachmayr pad installed, also increasing l.o.p. for my long arms. Also have a leather cheek pad on it to keep my head up for proper sight picture.

    From what you've told me, I'd probably be better off getting me some reduced recoil loads for the .270 and practice with them. Trouble is - I like to practice with what I'm gonna hunt with.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    The 270Win is a great caliber for those animals. I have a 7mm-08 A-bolt with wood stock, that kicks harder than it should. I also have a 7mmRM with a kevlar/foam stock that is lighter and has less felt recoil than it should. You might think about a different stock. Just my opinion??

    I was also around a Ruger M77 that kicked like a mule, until it was glass bedded, then it was fine. I was told there was a "pressure point" that caused the severe recoil. Don't know if its true or if its an old wives tale, but I shot it before and after bedding, and there was a difference.

    Don
     
  7. NYLES

    NYLES Well-Known Member

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    No way! Id give up a 270 for the 243! Not for deer and grasshopers anyway! Have you thought about a brake?

    Is your 270 A-bolt in the lite stalker? My paw in law bought one in 270WSM....recoil aint the word for it! We fixed most of that with a SIMMS pad but youve already added the pachmayr....

    Try lighter bullets 120 TSX....130 AB's

    Not to say the 243 aint capable but Id add a brake way before I thought of giving it up for a 243.
     
  8. Jeff In TX

    Jeff In TX Well-Known Member

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    Triggernosis,

    I feel your pain. I just sold my .270 a couple weeks back. With scope the whole package weighed in at 7.2 pounds and was the most uncomfortable rifle to shoot. It kicked worse than my featherweight .300 WSM. Thank goodness my oldest son claimed it a few years back and he was the only one who hunted with it.

    Everyone who would shoot would start out saying .270's don't kick...for some reason they never wanted to fire two shots in a row with mine and normally ended up saying HOLY $hit that things kicks worse than a mule.

    Anyhow, what helped most was the fact I loaded some 110 gr bullets for deer and pig hunting here in Texas. They worked great. I had 130 gr loads for mule deer & elk, not that I ever got to hunt elk with it.

    My oldest bought his first rifle and down sized to a .243 and loves it.

    As mentioned you might try a brake on the .270 first. My .270 barrel was so thin you really couldn't put a brake on it so I had it mag-na-ported. Biggest waist of money I ever spent. I like my brakes flush and seamless with the barrel, so that's why I couldn't put a brake on it.

    Best of luck!
     
  9. pinshootr

    pinshootr Well-Known Member

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    Okay then get out your 22 and go shoot 500 rounds or so and when you need more 22's pick up a good rifle rest (lead sled or something close) and retrain yourself before its to late!!!!! LOL Tod
     
  10. montanabadger

    montanabadger New Member

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    Yes a 243 will kick considerably less.
     
  11. grit

    grit Well-Known Member

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    I think you need to address the unpleasant recoil of your 270, and get a 243. I have both. Love them both. I fit my 270 with a Boyds thumbhole stock (laminated and heavy). The stock added a lot of weight. It is very pleasant to shoot now. Fourty rounds is no problem. If I didn't want to add the weight, I would absolutely put a brake on anything that made me flinch. Cheap investment to turn a rifle that makes you cringe into one you look forward to shooting. You may also want try limiting your number of shots so you stop shooting before you start flinching. Also, if you've already developed a flinch I would do a lot of dry firing. This will help tremendously to break the habit.

    Still, the 243 kicks less. And, burns less powder, shoots cheaper bullets, makes a great coyote gun........ Maybe I'll put a matching stock on the 243.

    Good luck!
     
  12. Triggernosis

    Triggernosis Well-Known Member

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    Trouble with replacing the stock is that the rifle is a Browning A-Bolt and it seems no friggin' body makes a danged replacement stock for the A-Bolt. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif
    I really like the rifle, but sometimes wish I hadn't got an A-Bolt because of the lack of aftermarket parts for it.
     
  13. screech

    screech Well-Known Member

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    I would get a 243 and keep the 270 also. Got one and I love it.
     
  14. grit

    grit Well-Known Member

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    Trigger,
    Hadn't thought of that. The A bolt stock with the little palm swell is a nice stock too. Brake it if you don't want to change it. I've never looked for a Browning stock. Figured HS, Boyds, Mcmillan, Richards...would all make 'em.

    Brake will most likely be cheaper than a new stock. And, you won't have to worry about whether it'll do enough. It will.