220 swift twist rate recommendation

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by bfishj, Sep 27, 2011.

  1. bfishj

    bfishj Member

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    Hey Guys...

    Having a cooper 220 swift built and had a question. I intend to shoot from 50 gr to 65 grain bullets in the rifle. I am stuck in California so will pretty much be regulated to Barnes all copper bullets which are longer than typical bullets. I am trying to decide between a 1:9 twist and a 1:10 twist. Leaning towards the 1:9 for versatility. Will the 1:9 stabilize 45 gr as well? Any help is greatly appreciated. The gun will be an all-around "truck" fun for coyotes, ground squirrels, possibly deer.

    Thanks again
     
  2. backwoods83

    backwoods83 Well-Known Member

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    Go for the 9, if the project hasn't really got up and running you may consider a 22-250 because its easier to get everything for and only trails slightly behind with bullet over 50grns or you could do the 22-250ai and out run the swift, but either off the 250 case will have a longer barrel life than the swift.
     

  3. BuckSnort

    BuckSnort Well-Known Member

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    I'd go 223AI with an 8 twist... but that's just me..
     
  4. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    I'm surprised nobody mentioned the 22PPC. Not quite as fast as a Swift, but a lot better shooting! Might also think about the .224BG. Pretty much a .300 Savage necked down to .224, but made off of .243 Winchester brass (use a .300 Savage headspace gauge). This round ought to be just about as fast as the 22-250, but with a much better barrel life and overall accuracey. Plus it uses a standard large bolt face
    gary
     
  5. bfishj

    bfishj Member

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    I was shooting for a 220 swift as I have a few hundred rounds of brass and dies. I have a 22-250 already and just wanted something a little different. My 22-250 covers the lighter 50 grain bullet area but wanted something effective for deer and hogs. Is there any appreciable accuracy loss when going with a tighter twist (1:9) and maybe someday trying 50 grain bullets?
     
  6. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    22 centerfires are too small for deer sized game in my book. And I'd probably want something bigger for hogs as well.
    gary
     
  7. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    I'd go 10tw myself(only for the 65gr bullets), or even 12tw for the lighter 50-55gr bullets.
    If you go all the way down to 8tw in 220swift, you'll be blowing up bullets.
     
  8. kweidner

    kweidner Well-Known Member

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    not trying to start a debate. shot 100s of medium size game with a swift. Velocity kills. keep it under 300, shoot accurate and they will drop em. Never had to look for one. alays dropped right there. Only went to the bigger calibers to get out past 300. shot the little 22's for 15 years.Shot neck, head, shoulder.....all DRT. loaded some barnes 55 for my neighbors kid. He's been shooting these for three years. Didn't DRT but easy to follow blood trail as there was a hlaf dollar size hole in each deer he killed. With the little pills that aren't Barnes you better shoot accurate and confident. Barnes 55 acts like a big .243. before the barnes it was a different story. pills just didn't open. Not the case anymore.
     
  9. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    Savage does a twelve twist barrel in 22-250, and it will just barely stablize the 60 grain bullets as long as the BC isn't too high. So a ten twist ought do at least bullets with a .33 BC and maybe a touch higher. But if your looking at 68 grains and heavier bullets I'd be looking at a 1:8. The problem there is that it overstabalizes the lighter bullets causing groups to open up. Guess this is good reason to own two rifles.

    I shoot 1:14, 1:12, 1:9, and a 1:10 very soon. Things will vary a little bit with each twist rate, and sorta limits me in what I can do with that barrel. I've noticed that the faster twist barrels seem to foul a little quicker than the slower twist ones, and really the tightest grouping barrels are the slower twist ones for me. I've came to the conclusion that the perfect barrel for a .223 is a twelve twist when I take in the case capacity and what I can do with it. Yet I don't own a twelve twist .223! Have never shot a 22-250 with a nine twist barrel, but know others that do. Most all like the combo very well once the decide on a good load combo for it. I believe there are better case designs for rounds with velocities in these ranges and higher, and I've expounded on these many times in the past. Plus I believe that when you are talking 400+yards, you need to be looking at something in 24 caliber or higher. And really for hogs and deer (least wise the size of deer around here), you need to be thinking about something like a .257. A Russian boar with three inch tusks can be very unfriendly, and that's why I like 35's and bigger stuff on them (my favorite is a .444)

    gary
     
  10. bfishj

    bfishj Member

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    Same situation...killed lots of deer and hogs with a 22-250 and 55 grainers...wanted to step up to the longer copper bullets.
     
  11. Trickymissfit

    Trickymissfit Well-Known Member

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    around here 250lb. bucks are getting to be common (live weight), and every once in awhile you see a 300lb buck. In Michigan 300lb. bucks are common. A 22 anything means your gonna track a deer a while before you get him. I'll stay with my hog comments cause there ain't no joy with a wounded Russian boar. Lots of stitches and maybe a perminant limp in your walk.
    gary
     
  12. bfishj

    bfishj Member

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    Around here ours top out at 180ish...pig-wise don't really shoot anything over a hundred for "eatability". I definitely agree if we had 250 lb deer the .270 would be by go-to.
     
  13. kweidner

    kweidner Well-Known Member

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    i agree with twist reccomendation. I will say though maybe a fluke, my Rra with a 1in 8 LOVES the 50 grainer. 1/4 minute out to 500 and 600 on paper (nosler). Same thing with the Barnes 70. Did a review on the 70 at midway. Check it out. actually shot one at a touch over 300 facing me with the 70 Barnes. broke neck, traveled all the way through deer, destroyed vitals, exited out of right Ham. Quarter size exit wound. Deer camp as was I slack jawed at the performance of the bullet. The Swift because of the velocity may not act that way with both extremes in weight but the .223 doesn't care. Either way I wouldn"t shoot one much past 300now that I have better rifles for that. Longest shot with little bores was 380 yds verified by laser. Neck shot with F4 jacketed Benchrest bullets. Deer never knew what hit it. It was a bang flop affair with my Swift. I will say I now relegate my .22s under 200 yards, out to 5 i shoot my 6.5x.284, over 500, the 300 RUM is the stick of choice. I have often wished one of my 22-250s had a faster twist. i am really interested to see if the little pills can stand up to that velocity and twist. Good luck with your build and keep us posted 1 and 8 would be my choice. after re reading initial post i should have said pre barnes had no exit not that they didn't open. Trust me they opened. Like stuffing a hand grenade in the body cavity and walking away. 3900 fps is pretty amazing when it hits 90 percent water. You may want to read a little on P.O Ackley and his veiws of the .22. If plate armor cant stop the little pills how is a deer or hog? Interesting to know those old timers views if they had the copper pills around then. We might all have been singing a different tune much earlier in our hunting careers.
     
  14. bfishj

    bfishj Member

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    I spoke with both Barnes and a real knowledgeable guy at Nosler.

    Barnes said a 1:9 will stabilize the 62 grain tsx...however you would need a 1:8 to stabilize the 70 grain tsx. Due to the length needed to achieve the weight he said the 1:9 should shoot the 53 and 55 grains well.

    The guy at Nosler said hands down he would pick the 1:9. Years ago when bullets had jacket issues the likelihood of bullets "comping" apart was very real. With today's modern bullet he said you could run the range from 50-70 grains comfortably. The 1:14 twist was to conform with the SAAMI requirements.

    My whole goal is a "knock" em on their butt fast gun that will put down a deer or pig inside 200 yards and a coyote out until you can't see him anymore. I really do believe it comes down to the discipline of the shooter and knowing the limitations of the catridge.

    That being said I am leaning towards the 1:9 as the 1:8 would force me to stay to the the higher end of the available bullet specturm.
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2011