22-250 with a 1/12 twist. . . which bullets.

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by Kenster-Boy, Dec 30, 2005.

  1. Kenster-Boy

    Kenster-Boy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    180
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2004
    I am looking at getting a savage 12bvss in 22-250. They come factory with a 1/12 twist barrel. I would like to know which kinds of high BC bullets it will stabilize? I was particularly looking at A-max or similar match bullets.

    Thanks for any insight.
     
  2. lerch

    lerch <strong>SPONSOR</strong>

    Messages:
    1,497
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    I shot one for a long time and had great luck with it. The largest bullet I could ever get stabilize in them was the 55gr ballistic tip. I tried everything from 60gr and up and none of them would shoot good and many choose to fly sideways /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/blush.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/blush.gif

    Try the 55gr ballistic silvertip FL sized with 39.5gr of H380 and a Win large rifle primer. The load is pretty hot in the summer but it was accurate as hell in my gun. Grouped in the 1" area out to 500yds with me.

    This load wont be worth much past about 700yds though, it is hell on wheels from 500yds back /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

    good luck
    steve
     

  3. Kenster-Boy

    Kenster-Boy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    180
    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2004
    Thanks for your expierence. Man that is sort of dissapointing that it wouldn't stabilize the longer heavier bullets. In that case I might have to go with the 223 because they come with a 1/9 twist and that will be more compatable with the bigger bullets. I guess that I could deal with a more "rainbow like" trajectory.

    Tell me if my theory is right here. . . going from a 22-250 to a 223 is about like the difference between a 300 win mag and a .308? They will still shoot the same distance but the 300/22-250 is just flatter?

    I guess what I'm asking is would it be foolish to try and get more distance from a 223 than a 22-250 because of the factory barrel twists?

    Hope all this makes sense. . .
     
  4. bailey1474

    bailey1474 <strong>SPONSOR</strong>

    Messages:
    1,922
    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2004
    Buy that .223 then have it rechambered to a 22-250 shouldn't be more that $100, I wouldn't think. Then you'll have the best of both worlds!!!
     
  5. lerch

    lerch <strong>SPONSOR</strong>

    Messages:
    1,497
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2004
    To be completely honest with you if I was gonna recommend a med to long range factory rifle I would tell you to go with the exact gun you are planning on now but get it in a 243 win.

    In the savage 243win the twist is 1-9.25 which will stabilize the hornady 105gr amax bullet. This bullet offers definate 1000yd preformance and me and Bill Bailey used it to great effect on pdogs out to nearly 1100yds. I also think GoodGrouper uses this bullet in his 6br Tejas.

    The 22-250 will be one hell of a accurate round but with the factory twist it really only offers 500-700yd consistant accuracy. My longest kill with it was 730yds.

    AS far as the 22-250 vs. 223 I am no longer the speed demon I once was but I still think the key to long range shooting is high BC bullets but you must push them with some horsepower. the 223 is a very fun and cheap round to shoot but I think you will have added range with the 22-250

    I think you would be ahead to ask yourself how far you are really wanting to shoot. If it is much past 600yds I would get the 243 win.

    Good Luck
    STeve
     
  6. coupalr

    coupalr Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    218
    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2005
    I ordered a 223 model 12 varmint with the 1" heavy barrel and left hand port to get the fast twist barrel and when it comes i will rechamber it to 22-243.
     
  7. LB

    LB Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    423
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    I don't know why the worry? Lots of folks shoot 60-63 grain bullets in their 1-14 twist barrels and get acceptable accuracy. You might need to find just the right bullet with enough bearing surface. Not hard to do.

    What I wouldn't do is buy a new factory rifle and modify it into something obscure which would degrade it's market value. Either buy a rifle in a caliber you can live with, or pick up a used rifle and order a premium barrel contoured and chambered to your tastes. That's probably the smartest move, in my opinion.

    Good hunting. LB