2010 first moose hunt

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by matt_3479, Oct 25, 2010.

  1. matt_3479

    matt_3479 Well-Known Member

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    My dream ever seen being a little boy was to hunt and kill a moose with my father. For the past 30 years my father and his best friends have gone up to northern Ontario to hunt moose. Before that, his best friends father went up to the same place to hunt moose for the past 50 years. And this year it was my turn. Im 17 years old and my father and i both drew bull tags for area 22 in Northern Ontario. My father called up the old gang and we headed up. There were 8 guys between 2 bull tags, one being my father, one being his best friend, another being his father and his son.

    It was a long, cold 10 day hunt that consisted of hunting in clear cuts, hunting the roads, and hunting the river. I sat in a clear cut for the first 7 days of the hunt seeing only 1 cow and a wolf. My father loved to hunt the river and he saw 5 cows and 2 calves. After the first 7 days have gone by with no one seeing any bulls yet everyone around us were bringing home bulls i decided to hunt the river with my dad.

    We went out early morning before light, loaded the boats and took off down river. Hunted every swamp, every bay, every lake and every stretch of water we could find. We even landed the boat to walk back into other swamps, lakes and clear cuts. Still no bulls. near the end of the day my dad decided we had better go back to the one lake they had spotted the calves and try to get one of them for meat. We troll up the river to the entering of the lake and i stand up to look around the weeds and i spotted a monster bull. We shut the motor off to glass him. I ranged him at 687 yards with two cows staying close to his side so right away i knew we needed to get closer. As we are slowly getting closer we hit ice which scared the two cows away so i knew he had to get a steady rest and just shoot. we got to some rocks, jumped out of the boat and set up. i lasered the big bull at 544 yards, my father shooting a 270. win with 150 grain and i was shooting a 300. wsm 180 grain bullets. I squeezed the first shot off and heard a wallop which my dad said it looked to be just in front if not close to the vitals and the big bull stumbled. My dad squeezed a shot off and shot high and the bull ran towards the water due to the sound of the bullet hitting the bush. I squeezed two more off and missed both as well as my father. I loaded the clip while my father ran back to the boat to get more shells and fired another. Another stumble and the moose almost fell over i fired my last 2 in the clip and i missed both. My father returned and fired and hit the moose high in the shoulder and the moose just stood there and all of a sudden his back end fell. The moose got back up and walked into the bush. My father has shot a few moose in his life but nothing of this size, and this being my first moose i was just blown away. This moose was estimated 50" is what it looked to be, and that was at 544 yards. The fact i got to spend it with my father was the best thing in the world. My father told everyone that night it was the most amazing experience and he would never forget it because he spend it with me.

    This is were we made our mistake. We rushed into the bush thinking with all those shots the moose must have been dead. It took 20 mins before we hit the bush due to trolling speeds. When we got in the bush the moose jumped up from where it lied down and ran like there was no tomorrow. We left the bush and came back the next day due to dark. We brought all 8 guys back one of them being 78 years old. We tracked the moose for 2.2km. The blood was vibrant red which usually indicates oxygenated blood (lung shot), there was foamy tissue (lung shot), and there was meaty tissue (gut shot). the 78 year old man started having chest pains and he needed to lay down so we realized then we had to get out and take him home in case. We lost the moose. I was extremely upset that we lost my first moose, and my fathers biggest moose but i was more upset that even though we hit the moose a few times, even made 2 good shots, we lost it and it went to waste.

    Best experience of my life, favorite memory, yet a disappointing ending.
     
  2. Flametop7

    Flametop7 Active Member

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    Sounds like an awesome story with your dad, congrats on the experience.
     

  3. M_Shock

    M_Shock Well-Known Member

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    Look man, I don't mean to be rude but how was this a good experience? I mean, you injured an animal that wasn't recovered. It sounds like you looked pretty hard and I know that it happens from time to time, but from how many misses you and your dad had.... Maybe you shouldn't have been shooting that far? Especially with a 270 and 300wsm.
     
  4. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    Bummer about loosing the bull, but I know even a bad day hunting can be a good day out with the old man!!!
     
  5. buzz4me2

    buzz4me2 Well-Known Member

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    With all due respect why does someone go hunting moose with a .270. Even the .300 is questionable but a well placed shot will do the trick.

    We have all been there and in the heat of the moment made mistakes that may have cost us a downed animal. Learn from this and please, please don't use a .270 for moose.
     
  6. happylilcuss

    happylilcuss Well-Known Member

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    Man I dont think this thread is going to go well. My .02 is that the above posters are right. I think that the calibers you chose were barely adequate if you were shooting under a 100yds but over that you were way under calibered. Congrats on the story but I feel like if you would have had the propper caliber you would have a trophy on your wall. Instead you left a gut shot wounded monarch that MAY end up wolf food.. (not that those flippin things need any help). As was said before please learn from your mistakes and it will make you a more ethical hunter. Again its just my .02..
     
  7. bassin93

    bassin93 Well-Known Member

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    This is not good, I think you should delete this one before too many read it. Your gettin flamed whether you know it or not.
     
  8. Troutslayer2

    Troutslayer2 Well-Known Member

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    That sucks that you lost a good moose. I suspect that you will learn from your mistakes on this one.
     
  9. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    Moose aren't too awful difficult to kill with any decent lung shot. I've shot quite a number of them, and the ones in Alaska are even larger than the moose in Ontario. Either rifle would have done the job if the bullets had been placed in the central boiler room, and then expanded within the chest cavity. So I don't particularly agree that you were under-gunned with either rifle for a broadside shot through the lungs. The 30 caliber rifle would be a tad better under less favorable shot opportunities.

    Sorry to hear that bull escaped. It takes a pretty good rest for most to connect at 500-600 yds, even on an animal the size of a moose. There are some lessons to be learned from your hunt. Consider this experience, what went right and what went wrong. Research, readjust & prepare. Then go out and nail the next moose you target in your riflescope!

    Thanks for sharing your hunting adventure. Don't get overly discouraged, especially as a result of some of these critical/negative Posts. Too much Monday night, after-the-fact quarterbacking going on here, IMO.

    Best wishes on your next effort.
     
  10. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    Excellent post man!!! Guys don't flame this young man, he had the gutts to post up a bad experience, this forum is one of the few spots where guys can, for the most part, share the good and the bad and get the help they are looking for instead of getting lit up like the 4th of July!!!
     
  11. matt_3479

    matt_3479 Well-Known Member

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    I appreciate the way you guys looked at the upside. I know what i did was a mistake, and its something i will look back on and learn from. Everyone has made mistakes and this one was mine.

    I fully disagree that we were under gunned. I currently own the biggest caliber out of everyone in my hunting party. 3 own 7mm rem mag including me, 1 owns a 270. win, i own a 300. wsm and the rest own a 30-06 and every single one of them have successfully taken moose from the ranges of 50-350 yards, including the 270. win on multiple occasions. and the 30-06 on a few occasions have taken moose past 500 yards. So i disagree with being under gunned especially with 2 guys firing at the same moose.

    Now i will and have learned from this experience but it was my first experience, i felt the need to share. It may have been a bad post and a bad experience but it is one i will never forget and is one that i actually rather enjoyed in a different way. The fact i was with my old man, and we learned together was enjoyable. Now im sorry if this story or my comment offended you guys but i disagree with your opinions.
     
  12. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    No need to apologize. Not every hunt ends the picture perfect way, but we obviously do our best to recover the animal. Your hunting story is one we can all learn from. I expect you will always remember this hunt fondly, no matter the outcome.

    One tip on following up a wounded moose, or any other large game animal after the shot. If there's any doubt about the lethality of the hit(s), it's generally a good idea to let the animal bed down after it's moved off into the brush or woods. They'll generally leave a trackable blood trail to the their initial 'bedding site'. If you give them some time to weaken or expire where they first bed down, recovery of the animal will often be more successful. A couple hours might be a good rule of thumb, depending on the location of the bullet impact, weather conditions, available light, etc. Spook them up off their first bedding site too quickly and in the event where they haven't weakened or died, they may charge off and not leave a good enough blood trail or sign to track and follow to their next bedding location.

    I'm not sure what your circumstances were. If it's raining, you pretty much need to follow up before the rain washes the sign away. And on an animal the size of a moose, if it's about to get dark, I would follow the trail before losing light, because an animal the size of a moose will typically spoil if left dead overnight without field dressing and getting the hide off of the large quarters. They meat needs to cool down, or a spoiling process referred to as bone souring will make the meat all but inedible. Yeah - I know from first hand experience. :rolleyes: I was 21 years old at that time.
     
  13. Oliveralan

    Oliveralan Well-Known Member

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    While I appreciate you sharing the story, that was extremely irresponsible. Yor father has hunted for a long time and should know his limits.

    No doubt you guys know when it
    comes to hunting
    moose but slinging lead at such a huge and tough animal from 560yards was foolish. It ran off to die a slow death and you guys didn't get any meat.
    Posting/reading on this site does not give anyone the ability to shoot to that range, only a LOT of practice does.

    I'm 16 myself, and have done some stupid things while hunting (NF turret 10moa high for example) but I've never ever had to track any animal I've killed. I put 4000rounds through my .308 this year and practice really pays off.
     
  14. rtv900

    rtv900 Well-Known Member

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    Well as I read you post I suspect if you didn't have to get the older guy out of camp you may have been able to get it. I have had to get someone out of camp once before and even though i was not tracking an animal at the time there wasn't much else that I was thinking of.

    Two years ago a friend of mine shot a moose with a .270 at 405 yards. He shoots everything with a .270. He rocked it on the first shot and killed it on the second. I understand you were another 100+ yards but with good shot placement it would have been ok with the 300 anyways. I have witnessed what a .300 wam can do at 500 and I like it.

    I'm sure there are several people on this forum that have made some loooong shots and had it go bad. I bet they didn't post about it though. :). I have found that practice is a great thing but there is a huge difference between shooting paper and an animal. When it's time to shoot in the field and you have distance, wind, grass blowing, sticks and brush in your way and an animal that could move at any second. Well it is different than shooting paper for sure.

    The only real mistake I see is bring a 78 year old man along on a moose hunt. But I would also have a hard time telling any 78 year old guy that wanted to go that he couldn't go.