1st plane reticles and long shots on deer sized game

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by SAKO75HUNTER, Aug 6, 2005.

  1. SAKO75HUNTER

    SAKO75HUNTER Active Member

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    Jan 26, 2004
    I have a S&B 1.5-6x42 A7 reticle and it is 1st plane reticle. At longer distances, i am wondering if it is hindering shot placement on deer sized game. It really takes up a good portion of the target. Do any of you use 1st plane reticles and if so what model. I am talking 350 yards or less.
     
  2. älg

    älg Well-Known Member

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    Oct 19, 2004
    it will depend on how thick the reticle is, <i do not know how thick yours is. I am currently using a swarovs. 3-12 x 50 with a tds ret. and shots up to 500 yds. or more are no problem.

    Just some weeks ago I saw a kill at over 700 yards, with a zeiss 3-12 x 56 with a 4 reticle, also 1st focal plane.

    Bear in mind that with a 1,5- 6, the reticle will not get as thick >( given the same ret. size) as with a x 12... I do not think you should have problems at the distances you are talking about, although I must say I don´t know the details on that ret. you are using.

    good luck.
     

  3. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Its my understanding, which may be way out of wack, is that the reticle remains "calibrated" no matter what the power. Therefore, I figure it would be more accurate as it is covering the same amount of "target" no matter what the power. What I think I'm attempting to say is that it would be easier to define portions of a mil at the higher power and longer dstance.

    Correct me if I'm not correct as I am about to purchase a 1st plane scope based on the above tho'ts. Maybe ya'll could save me from myself /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  4. älg

    älg Well-Known Member

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    Roy, that´s right, but the effect of the reticle staying calibrated is twofold.

    On one side, the reticle size- target size ratio stays the same. This means that a reticle that covers x inches at 100 yds, will cover 10 x at 1000 yds.

    European reticles such as the 4, ret., and others, have a thick post on the outside and the inner part of the crosshair is thinner to allow better aiming. The distance or part of the target that the thin post or part of the crosshair covers remains the same no matter if you are in the low or in the high magnification of the scope. These reticles are rarely used to calculate holdover and sometimes can be useful at calculating distances, since the thinner part of the crosshair covers, i.e. (usually) 70 cm. at 100 m. So if you know that an animal is 70 cm. long, and fits exactly in the thin part, it is 100 m. away..

    Now secod thing is if you wanna take a long shot, the crosshair may be a little too thick depending on the target size and the distance... that is happening to me with my swaro. if I attempt to shoot at long distances ( well, at least what I call long ), the crosshair is too thick . So if one is interested in LRS, and plans to use a first focal plane reticle, you must bear in mind the thickness of the crosshair. That´s why i am going with a S $B now with a mil dot - gen 2 type reticle... the mil´s are always mil´s no matter the magnification, and can be used for measuring or estimating any time, not just at max. power... and the reticle is still thin enough to attemp long shots at higher magnification.