1st Focal Plane Reticle

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by statjunk, Mar 25, 2010.

  1. statjunk

    statjunk Well-Known Member

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    Can someone explain this and what is the advantage?

    Thanks

    Tom
     
  2. geargrinder

    geargrinder Well-Known Member

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    The advantage is that you can use the reticle to range distance at any power setting. You can also use the dots or hashes for holdover at any power setting.
     

  3. statjunk

    statjunk Well-Known Member

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    Whoah. That is a major advantage.

    What scopes have a first focal plane reticle?

    Thanks

    Tom
     
  4. statjunk

    statjunk Well-Known Member

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    Isn't the need for this nullified if you're using clicks to dial in your scope?

    Thanks

    Tom
     
  5. joseph

    joseph Well-Known Member

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    What if it is snowing and your laser rangefinder doesn't work? You can still range at any power instead of having to dial to maximum power to range then dial back down to take your shot. This takes time when hunting. You could have the trophy of a life time move out of sight before you can shoot.

    "Aim small miss small", :D

    joseph
     
  6. joseph

    joseph Well-Known Member

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    This is the scope I pre-ordered at SWFA:

    Vortex 6-24x50 Viper PST 30mm Rifle Scope
    Stock # - PST624F1A
    Matte
    EBR-1 MOA Reticle
    30mm
    First Focal Plane Reticle
    .25 MOA Adjustments
    $899.95
     
  7. 1700fps

    1700fps New Member

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    Can you still range with an MOA reticle? I am still trying to decide between the MOA or Mil reticle. The MOA can make smaller adjustments, but want to be able to range with it as well.
     
  8. Don Ward

    Don Ward Well-Known Member

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    Ranging with an MOA reticle:

    Size of your target in inches divided by how many minutes it covers. Then X 100.

    If a 28" bull elk chest (top to bottom) takes up 7 minutes in the scope, you take 28 divided by 7 = 4 (400 yards).
     
  9. statjunk

    statjunk Well-Known Member

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    What other scopes out there are first focal plane?

    Thanks

    Tom
     
  10. Boss Hoss

    Boss Hoss Well-Known Member

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    For the most part with the exception of 1 or 2 Loopys and a NF, USO which is the only real US made on this continent uses them exclusively (my favorite optic). All of the Best Of Class Scopes from Europe use FFP. Not going to go into the specific merits of FFP but here are advantages.
     
  11. statjunk

    statjunk Well-Known Member

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    Boss,

    Can you please tell me about the advantages?

    Thanks

    Tom
     
  12. Boss Hoss

    Boss Hoss Well-Known Member

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    Tom---I found this to save me a lot of typing Plus----when you have the reticle using more moving parts to keep the reticle size the same it is adding complexity and this means more can break.

    Europeans prefer first plane scopes because they legally and normally hunt a lot later than we do here, and larger reticles are easier to see on a target. First plane scopes also cannot change point of impact when changing magnification because the reticle does not move. The focus for the reticle and the parallax adjustment are such that when you change the parallax setting on a first plane scope you will sometimes lose sharp focus of your reticle. Therefore, most European scopes have a fast-focus eyepiece. This is for the reticle and nothing else. Most European scopes are also built on 30mm tubes, many of them steel instead of aluminum. They are in general bigger and heavier than their American counterparts.

    First plane scopes with rangefinding type reticles may be used at any power. European glass is second to none. Second plane scopes or "American" scopes are smaller and lighter and can have point of impact change when changing magnification, and many of them, especially less expensive ones certainly do. The parallax setting on second plane scopes has nothing to do with the reticle focus, so fast-focus eyepieces are a matter of convenience and pretty much a useless feature. Set it once properly at high power and leave it forever. Second plane scopes also have a smaller appearing reticle on the target at high power than low power, which is extremely important for precise shot placement. Second plane scopes with rangefinding type reticles are designed to be used at one power only. BDC reticles are not excluded from this. Traditionally, second plane scopes are one inch, but 30mm tubes are gaining popularity rapidly. Most people think that the larger tube offers a brighter image, but this is not true, although it may in some cases offer better resolution. Steel scopes are a thing of the past here. Also, all of our glass is imported, with no exceptions I am aware of on magnified scopes."
     
  13. statjunk

    statjunk Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Boss.

    Lots to think about!

    Tom
     
  14. 1700fps

    1700fps New Member

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    Thanks Don!

    That seems a lot easier than using Mils. I'm going to have to search the net and see what i can find on this now.