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Are wolves really the problem

 
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  #106  
Old 09-03-2013, 08:30 AM
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Location: Spokane, WA
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Re: Are wolves really the problem

The only thing endangered is the paychecks of parasites following wolves around for a living. Seriously world wide wherever wolves exist it's the same story they eat themselves out of wildlife, then it's livestock then pets. Russia, France, BC, Alberta, and Alaska are all spending considerable dollars trying to keep their numbers in check. At some point a cost analysis will turn back to poison. The game numbers we enjoyed years ago were secondary to solid predator control. Numerous articles exist showing cow/calf ratios before and after predator control measures, antelope, deer, caribou, elk, and moose. Some of those studies show ratios improving from single digits in some cases, to highs in the upper 80% range. Its not poachers, subsistence hunters, or ranchers killing the young, and some of those numbers were before the introduction of an apex predator like the wolf. Many units in Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming you can drive to and count for yourself. The Gardner unit north of Yellowstone had 1500 late season elk tags pre wolf, its closed now. For 35 years that elk herd withstood, poachers, road kill, depredation hunts, ranching, harsh winters and native harvest, but it could not survive the wolf. Moose populations have dropped across the board as well. Why aren't these species enjoying a rejuvenation now that they have the weak and sick culled by the all knowing wise wolf that assesses the herd and trims it to their mutual benefit. The entire story of the wolf being placed in Yellowstone is a complete lie from its inception to the present.
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  #107  
Old 09-03-2013, 08:54 AM
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Location: Carey, Idaho
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Re: Are wolves really the problem

Since this thread is all over the place now, I'll give you all ANOTHER reason wolves are the problem. Not that you really need another reason.
I do leatherwork and one of the local sheep outfits commissioned me to make wolf collars for the guard dogs. These collars have nails attached to a solid metal plate sandwiched in between two pieces of leather and the nails are welded onto the plate. They are extremely heavy duty to withstand an attack from a wolf as they go for the necks on the guard dogs which are either pyranees or akbashes. I made about 30 of these collars for 3 different sheep outfits and they worked great.
I can also give you example after example of wolves killing guard dogs in this area of Idaho all the while killing sheep. (in between killing elk) I've seen photos (I'll try to get them for you as you keep saying you need proof) of a pyranees shredded by a pack of wolves as he tried to defend the flock while the herder went to town. It was horrific.
In any case, the collars worked great----until the wolves figured it out. It took them no time at all after getting their mouths impaled. Know what they did then???
They went for the guts. So, yeah, they're a problem.

Randy
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  #108  
Old 09-03-2013, 10:02 AM
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Location: South of Canada and North of Wyoming
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Re: Are wolves really the problem

Quote:
Originally Posted by longrangehuntr View Post
Two years after Congress removed gray wolves from the endangered species list in the northern Rockies, the animals are facing a new threat: disease. Outbreaks of infections such as sarcoptic mange, which is spread by mites, and canine distemper virus (CDV), have reduced wolf survival rates and contributed to an overall decline in Yellowstone National Park wolves.
Until recently, wolf populations in Yellowstone had been on a steady upswing. In 1995 park managers brought in 31 gray wolves from Canada to restore a population that had been virtually wiped out by hunting and other forms of depredation. (Montana veterinarians introduced the mange-carrying mite Sarcoptes scabiei to Yellowstone in 1905 in an effort to extirpate the wolves.) The most recent count put the regional wolf population at 1,727 in 2011, well above the lower limit set by federal agencies.
The Yellowstone wolves may be particularly susceptible to disease because, as transplants, they are relatively new to their environment. And wolf pups are the most at risk: only 16 survived this year, down from 34 in 2011.
Although scientists do not believe the illnesses pose a threat to the wolves' long-term survival, the new data may spur managers to tweak conservation plans. Wyoming has already reduced its hunting quota from 52 to 29, which experts say is a step in the right direction but may not be enough to shield the population from chance disturbances, be they trophy hunts or diseases. “Whether this is enough of a reduction will be evaluated following the next hunt,” which begins in December, says Emily Almberg, a graduate ecology student at Pennsylvania State University who studies the wolves.
This is typical of unmanaged natural populations. When the wolves were first introduced to Yellowstone, there was an abundance of elk for them to prey upon. Food was plentiful and life was good for the mutts... and for the first time in natural history, the wolf did not have a predator (man) chasing him. Wolf populations grew quickly to the point of over population. The number 1 and 2 causes of death for wolves is other wolves and disease. When wild populations grow to the point of over population the usual natural cure for it is disease.

Rest assured though, that this will not kill off all the wolves, not by any means. Their populations will drop, settle out and continue to rise and eb along with the populations of their prey and they will continue to breed and spread like a plague through out the country.
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  #109  
Old 09-03-2013, 10:16 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2010
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Re: Are wolves really the problem

What was suppose to be gained by introducing a predator that would kill of? In the end it comes down to money and this will end up taking lots of revenue for states.
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  #110  
Old 09-03-2013, 10:28 PM
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Location: Western Montana
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Re: Are wolves really the problem

Quote:
Originally Posted by longrangehuntr View Post
What was suppose to be gained by introducing a predator that would kill of? In the end it comes down to money and this will end up taking lots of revenue for states.
What will be gained is that less people will be hunting and therefore less people will be interested in owning guns or opposing gun control.
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  #111  
Old 09-04-2013, 01:11 AM
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Re: Are wolves really the problem

I think there are as many people if not more that own firearms that do not hunt. the professional shooting community is growing and 3 gun is huge as well the mounted shooters. To try and kill off big game to where people cant hunt would take too much money. If you wanted to limit hunting to where people stop they could just limit the number of tags more so than they are now.
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  #112  
Old 09-04-2013, 06:24 AM
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Join Date: May 2010
Location: Western Montana
Posts: 44
Re: Are wolves really the problem

Quote:
Originally Posted by longrangehuntr View Post
To try and kill off big game to where people cant hunt would take too much money.
Since when did our rulers care how much money the Federal Reserve issues out of thin air?
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