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Are wolves really the problem

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  #99  
Unread 09-03-2013, 12:26 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2010
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Re: Are wolves really the problem

Membership to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, any of you members?
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  •   #100  
    Unread 09-03-2013, 12:35 AM
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    Join Date: Sep 2011
    Location: Los Lunas, NM
    Posts: 214
    Re: Are wolves really the problem

    Family membership RMEF. Life Member NAHC, Life Member NRA, daughter Member DU, other daughter Member NWTF.

    When I get more money I plan on becoming a member of any bow hunting organization I can and turning my daughters memberships to life members.
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      #101  
    Unread 09-03-2013, 12:44 AM
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    Join Date: Jun 2010
    Posts: 106
    Re: Are wolves really the problem

    Any info on the lion introduction? I would very much like to read about that since the wildlife bios there never mentioned that. There are mnt lions there but I never heard about the lions. yeah in the tune of $15,000-$20,000 for tags on the indian res. same with the antelop tags and there are somehow ranches in the middle of the national forest land that control the hunting. 8x8 elk have come out of unit 34, cattle ranch area. the crazy thing is the state of texas considers the oryx a nuisance animal but some how still charge a truck load to hunt them. ft bliss which boards white sands sees the large oryx herd on ft bliss property but texas does not count them as game. I can see predators any predator species do damage if not controlled but they cannot be destroyed or other critters get out of control. for example, driving around wsmr, the coyote and bear population was destroyed when nmgf used poison packets dropped from aircraft. the jack rabbits, ground squirrels and whatever else are not out of control.
    sometimes hunters have to take matters into their own hands since g&f will not manage the resources responsibly.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Red Sparky View Post
    Did you know when they introduced them they also introduced African Lions? At White Sands Missile Range there are pictures of lions on the missile range. The lions didn't make it so they had no predators but hunters. Imagine if we were having this discussion over lions rather than wolves.

    Now I am not starting a fight among ranchers and hunters but these are my personal experiences.

    On your other post you stated the ranchers and Native Americans drive elk onto their land. I can't say from personal experience about Native Americans but I have seen ranchers moving elk into their land from forest service boundaries before hunting season. Yes you can move them by human scent and activity in the area before hunting season. A lot of people have called this false but it does happen. The reason is in your other post.....BIG BUCKS for private land tags.

    I have been to NM G&F meetings when ranchers were bitching about the elk on their land destroying crops and causing an economic hardship on the ranches and wanting more tags. When I asked them, in the open meeting, if I could hunt their ranch since I had a public land tag I was told NO.

    The same with the Oryx....ranchers wanted to charge to hunt their land or no access. Now that is their land to charge access to but don't complain about the wild life damaging the land and crops if you do not want animals taken off it without charging $.

    Now as I stated earlier I am not starting a fight between hunters and ranchers. I RESPECT them both, I have been on both sides of the fence. I know people on both the good and bad side of hunting and ranching. Some bad apples on both sides give the whole barrel a bad taste.

    Now to get back on topic..Yes the wolves are a major problem. They should have been hunted a lot sooner than they started the hunting season. The reintroduction is completely FUBAR and I don't think we as hunters can catch up and reduce the population to what it should be.
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      #102  
    Unread 09-03-2013, 12:48 AM
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    Join Date: Jun 2010
    Posts: 106
    Re: Are wolves really the problem

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Red Sparky View Post
    Family membership RMEF. Life Member NAHC, Life Member NRA, daughter Member DU, other daughter Member NWTF.

    When I get more money I plan on becoming a member of any bow hunting organization I can and turning my daughters memberships to life members.

    great, i have pheasants and quail forever foundations as well.
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      #103  
    Unread 09-03-2013, 12:51 AM
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    Join Date: May 2008
    Location: South of Canada and North of Wyoming
    Posts: 6,068
    Re: Are wolves really the problem

    No. I am not a member of the RMEF. The REMF supports, and I quote...

    Quote:
    The Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation supports the science-based management of wolves and other predators.

    Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation > News and Media > Press Room > Predator Management & Control
    They should have fought tooth and nail to prevent the introduction of wolves. Instead, they welcomed it. I'm more than a little hot about that!

    I don't mind bears and lions as we had good populations of elk with them around before the wolves showed up. But introducing wolves was like setting a wildfire in a summer drought. They breed like rats and they spread. In 20 years they will own half the Rocky Mountains and other wildlands here in the West. In 40 years they will be from here to Mexico and CA.

    I am not at all in favor of any management of vermin. I am in favor of complete eradication. The RMEF can go ......
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      #104  
    Unread 09-03-2013, 01:23 AM
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    Join Date: Jun 2010
    Posts: 106
    Re: Are wolves really the problem

    Two years after Congress removed gray wolves from the endangered species list in the northern Rockies, the animals are facing a new threat: disease. Outbreaks of infections such as sarcoptic mange, which is spread by mites, and canine distemper virus (CDV), have reduced wolf survival rates and contributed to an overall decline in Yellowstone National Park wolves.
    Until recently, wolf populations in Yellowstone had been on a steady upswing. In 1995 park managers brought in 31 gray wolves from Canada to restore a population that had been virtually wiped out by hunting and other forms of depredation. (Montana veterinarians introduced the mange-carrying mite Sarcoptes scabiei to Yellowstone in 1905 in an effort to extirpate the wolves.) The most recent count put the regional wolf population at 1,727 in 2011, well above the lower limit set by federal agencies.
    The Yellowstone wolves may be particularly susceptible to disease because, as transplants, they are relatively new to their environment. And wolf pups are the most at risk: only 16 survived this year, down from 34 in 2011.
    Although scientists do not believe the illnesses pose a threat to the wolves' long-term survival, the new data may spur managers to tweak conservation plans. Wyoming has already reduced its hunting quota from 52 to 29, which experts say is a step in the right direction but may not be enough to shield the population from chance disturbances, be they trophy hunts or diseases. “Whether this is enough of a reduction will be evaluated following the next hunt,” which begins in December, says Emily Almberg, a graduate ecology student at Pennsylvania State University who studies the wolves.
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      #105  
    Unread 09-03-2013, 05:54 AM
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    Join Date: May 2010
    Location: Western Montana
    Posts: 45
    Re: Are wolves really the problem

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by longrangehuntr View Post
    Membership to the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, any of you members?
    I used to be, then I figured them out and quit. Not only did they support the wolf introduction, they still do as evidenced by their refusal to inform their members about the hydatid issue.
    Yes, they parade around pretending to be the "last word" on North American Elk and they withhold important information that would discredit those responsible for the demise of 9/10 of said Elk. They talk out of both sides of their mouths.
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