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what do you think???????????

 
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  #8  
Old 09-29-2008, 10:16 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: bismarck ND
Posts: 406
Re: what do you think???????????

hes not bad at all, not a booner but if its in unit 22 i will come shoot it for you then you can look at it while a tag it,,,,

Last edited by tjonh2001; 09-29-2008 at 10:34 PM.
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  #9  
Old 09-30-2008, 08:24 AM
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Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 11
Re: what do you think???????????

Quote:
Originally Posted by .280fan View Post
I'm going to have to agree with RedChili...that's a buck worth taking.

Are antelope any good to eat?
Wow, I wouldn't HESITATE to flip off the safety. And then retire the nice buck who currently adorns my wall above the mantle.

Antelope are good eating IF you don't ruin it. I've seen a lot of styles of handling and cooking the meat, and most make it ... um, not as good an experience as it could be, let me put it like that.

Don't run the animal, and dress the animal and cool the meat down ASAP. Them's the principles.

I hunt with coolers and ice in the truck. The second I field dress the animal, it goes up on a hoist on the front of my truck, and the peeling starts, my back to the wind (so the hair, which fairly EXPLODES off the hide as you skin, won't get in the meat. I hate tarps). Caping is easier too, if he is a buck worth mounting.

This also makes it easy to remove the front shoulders (careful to follow the scapula so you don't damage the backstraps, which I take clear up the neck), and I use a knife on all the joints rather than saw the legs (unless I am in a hurry for some reason). Tenderloins go in a freezer-thickness Ziploc. Then (and some will give me gas for this) the meat goes in a white tough garbage bag and in the cooler, as I remove each quarter (this is why I don't want sharp edges on the bones). Keeps the water off the meat. Then slice off the back straps and they go in a gallon freezer Ziploc. Cover all with ice and close it up.

I keep the brisket and flanks though there isn't much, because it simmers down nicely in the crock pot. Good red chili. You can keep the front legs from the hock up, not much below that worth wrestling with. Same with the rear. Good rump roasts can be had, see crock pot notes above. Backstraps make good steaks of course. If you elect to cut the rump roasts into steaks, that works too, though better with does (especially younger ones).

When I butcher the meat, I clean it - as little water as possible - and vacuum seal it with olive oil (there is NO fat on the meat), worcestershire sauce, some garlic, Montreal Steak seasoning sometimes, and in the case of the steaks I might throw some melted butter in there too. This lets the marinade permeate and seal the meat from freezer burning. Don't use anything TOO strong or you will overpower this mild meat. When grilling steaks DO NOT OVERCOOK as the meat can get rubbery. Cooked on a HOT fire and served rare or medium rare, you will have a following of friends. I kept elk camp entertained with antelope steaks freshly grilled one year and had folks lining up for thirds. First time they'd had antelope.

Roasts are nice in the crock pot, but I season, flour and sear them first. Searing meat is important IMHO for flavor. Sometimes you can put olive oil in a Dutch Oven and sear them, then add beef broth, onions, canned tomatoes, shallots, Italian herbs, red wine, and simmer in the oven on low heat until the meat falls apart. The meat dries easily, so slicing into smaller sizes helps the meat absorb the liquids. Stew is wonderful for that reason. So is green chili, but you need to add seared pork fat to that if you want flavor.

Some have referred to it as the queen of meats, but elk holds that honor IMHO. Good meat though, if hunted, handled, and cooked properly. If not, rubbery liver like any venison.
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Last edited by RedChili; 09-30-2008 at 08:29 AM.
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  #10  
Old 09-30-2008, 06:22 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Alaska
Posts: 254
Re: what do you think???????????

All of sudden, I'm hungry.
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  #11  
Old 10-02-2008, 09:02 AM
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Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: corpus christi,tx
Posts: 816
Re: what do you think???????????

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedChili View Post
Wow, I wouldn't HESITATE to flip off the safety. And then retire the nice buck who currently adorns my wall above the mantle.

Antelope are good eating IF you don't ruin it. I've seen a lot of styles of handling and cooking the meat, and most make it ... um, not as good an experience as it could be, let me put it like that.

Don't run the animal, and dress the animal and cool the meat down ASAP. Them's the principles.

I hunt with coolers and ice in the truck. The second I field dress the animal, it goes up on a hoist on the front of my truck, and the peeling starts, my back to the wind (so the hair, which fairly EXPLODES off the hide as you skin, won't get in the meat. I hate tarps). Caping is easier too, if he is a buck worth mounting.

This also makes it easy to remove the front shoulders (careful to follow the scapula so you don't damage the backstraps, which I take clear up the neck), and I use a knife on all the joints rather than saw the legs (unless I am in a hurry for some reason). Tenderloins go in a freezer-thickness Ziploc. Then (and some will give me gas for this) the meat goes in a white tough garbage bag and in the cooler, as I remove each quarter (this is why I don't want sharp edges on the bones). Keeps the water off the meat. Then slice off the back straps and they go in a gallon freezer Ziploc. Cover all with ice and close it up.

I keep the brisket and flanks though there isn't much, because it simmers down nicely in the crock pot. Good red chili. You can keep the front legs from the hock up, not much below that worth wrestling with. Same with the rear. Good rump roasts can be had, see crock pot notes above. Backstraps make good steaks of course. If you elect to cut the rump roasts into steaks, that works too, though better with does (especially younger ones).

When I butcher the meat, I clean it - as little water as possible - and vacuum seal it with olive oil (there is NO fat on the meat), worcestershire sauce, some garlic, Montreal Steak seasoning sometimes, and in the case of the steaks I might throw some melted butter in there too. This lets the marinade permeate and seal the meat from freezer burning. Don't use anything TOO strong or you will overpower this mild meat. When grilling steaks DO NOT OVERCOOK as the meat can get rubbery. Cooked on a HOT fire and served rare or medium rare, you will have a following of friends. I kept elk camp entertained with antelope steaks freshly grilled one year and had folks lining up for thirds. First time they'd had antelope.

Roasts are nice in the crock pot, but I season, flour and sear them first. Searing meat is important IMHO for flavor. Sometimes you can put olive oil in a Dutch Oven and sear them, then add beef broth, onions, canned tomatoes, shallots, Italian herbs, red wine, and simmer in the oven on low heat until the meat falls apart. The meat dries easily, so slicing into smaller sizes helps the meat absorb the liquids. Stew is wonderful for that reason. So is green chili, but you need to add seared pork fat to that if you want flavor.

Some have referred to it as the queen of meats, but elk holds that honor IMHO. Good meat though, if hunted, handled, and cooked properly. If not, rubbery liver like any venison.
Man thank for the help on some cooking ideas like i said i have never had a opportunity to hunt them before. For as running them that should not be a problem on this ranch they have not been hunted in years. most of the one's i saw where with in 50-75yrd and just laid there or walked off slow. the ranch hand that lives on the ranch now said that there are a lot more coming back on the ranch. i guess the fire ran them off aways. but we all so got a lot of the watering troves going on the ranch that had been down for three years before we got it. the water should help a lot i would think. where going to fly out there Friday i hope and take a look. From what every one on here has said about this one in the pic i should easily find a good one . i saw some last time that where a lot big even not knowing what to look for i could tell they where way bigger. thanks for all of the help guys. if i get one it will be posted soon as i land. thanks again
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  #12  
Old 10-02-2008, 11:31 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Alberta
Posts: 856
Re: what do you think???????????

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedChili View Post
When I butcher the meat, I clean it - as little water as possible - and vacuum seal it with olive oil (there is NO fat on the meat), worcestershire sauce, some garlic, Montreal Steak seasoning sometimes, and in the case of the steaks I might throw some melted butter in there too. This lets the marinade permeate and seal the meat from freezer burning.
Now that's a good idea. I never thought of doing that. Thanks!
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  #13  
Old 10-06-2008, 10:54 PM
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Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Missouri
Posts: 143
Re: what do you think???????????

In my opinion, I would pass on the buck. He has nice cutters, but will have poor mass measurements, and he is not very long. If you're just looking for a decent buck, you've found him; but if you're looking for one that will score well, pass on him and find a heavier buck. Just my 2 cents.
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