Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Hunting > Deer Hunting


Reply

So whats wrong with the .243 on Deer?

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #22  
Old 08-10-2013, 11:43 AM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Reno, Nevada
Posts: 951
Re: So whats wrong with the .243 on Deer?

Yes, but sometimes enough to make a differance.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 08-10-2013, 12:58 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 1
Re: So whats wrong with the .243 on Deer?

I hate to admit it, but I lost a large 8-pointer last season with 180 grain TTSX coming out of a .30-06 at 2880fps. It was a bad shot and hit him in the guts...about 80 yards with some twigs about half way between us (which the bullet hit). Looking back, I shouldn't haven taken the shot...but at that moment, I thought it was good. Found the skeloton on the last day of the season about 300 yards from where he was shot, and about 70 yards further than I was looking (didn't find one drop of blood).

My point is, exactly what others have stated, SHOT PLACEMENT is key. If you put a good shot into the vitals, any legal caliber should do the job. A bad shot is a bad shot.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 08-10-2013, 01:20 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 12
Re: So whats wrong with the .243 on Deer?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greg Duerr View Post
Monday morning out at the Range I was doing my final work up for my Deer Hunting load in my .243 AI. I will be shooting the Sierra Pro Hunter 44.2gr of H4350, I will crono them this week. Several guys I was talking to asked me what I was going to be hunting with for Mule Deer this fall in Nevada, when I told them they both said, "Big Mistake the .243 is not a Deer Cartridge we have seen way to many deer lost to the .243". So, thats five guys so far that have said the same thing. Yet I would bet that just as many Deer are lost each year to .270's and 30-06's as to the .243 All the years I have hunted with the .243 I have yet to loose one. Several years I hunted with a guy that used a 22-250 shooting 53 gr Barnes bullets he took his shots carefully and was a great shot and he never lost a Mule Deer...........
Lots of thoughts out there ......Trouble with saying that even though the deer was well hit we never found it ...........is that you cant prove it was well hit.

G
I have hunted mule deer most of my life in Utah and Wyoming. Utah allows any centerfire cartridge on all big game including moose and bison. I am sure there are hunters who will go moose hunting with a 17 Ackley bee and its 25 grain bullet because it’s legal. When I started hunting big game (carrying a rifle) at 12 years old I carried a 22-250 and killed my first muley with it. When I was about 15years old I used a 243 as did my mother and older sisters who still use them today. The 243 win is a great gun for smaller framed hunters who can shoot them without as much kick -more accurate- less flinch and can shoot it longer at the range/sighting. The most important aspect of shooting, I think, is to know your equipment, less recoil=more rounds fired. Sure there is the question of ethical hunting comes into play and each hunter makes that choice themselves within the laws of their state. As for me “if it can kill a human it can kill a deer” Knowing how to recover a misplaced shot animal is very important in all calibers. I was taught at a very young age after your shot to wait and watch your hit animal for at least 30 minutes and up to an hour before trying to recover it. A wounded animal hit anywhere if undisturbed will lay down and go into shock, if it is pursued it will run for a long time and great distance and chances are it will be lost. Just like a Basketball player who twist a knee can finish a game but the next morning he can’t walk. I have used this method many times and have recovered every hit animal. One time I took a 500 yard shot at a large mule deer with a mil dot scope I doped him in on my mildot master at a 36” target but this muley was big around 44” he was hit in his front leg with a 30.06 just above the knee and about 5” down from his chest I sat and watched him for an hour placed my orange cap on a tree where I shot him from for a reference. And went to the spot I was watching and about 30 feet away there he was alive but immobilized, If this deer was chased after it was hit it would have been lost. Enjoy your 243 AI and shoot it as much as you can know your rifle and you will hit anything you shoot at.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 08-10-2013, 02:33 PM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Reno, Nevada
Posts: 951
Re: So whats wrong with the .243 on Deer?

Ive posted this story before.............The one and only Bull Elk I shot was hit with a 180gr bullet out of a 300 Win Mag. The bullet hit him right behind the shoulder and broke the other shoulder on the way out. The Bull walked up a hill and turned back and looked in my direction before going down about 3-4 minutes after stopping. If he had taken off at a run he might have gone 300 yards plus. This was a big Bull that scored 320
Point is that even when well hit with a 300 Win. Mag and a good bullet there is No guarentee that all will go well, you just dont know what might happen.
I once talked with a guy that shot a Grizzly in Alaska with a 300 Weatherby and even though the bullet tore up his lungs and he hit the dirt with the shot he still got up and ran 150 yards. I hit a coyote with a 22-250 and a 50gr V-Max he ran almost 100 yards with a huge exit hole about 3"x3" out the Lung.........In all due respect he should have dropped at the shot.
All you can do it to spend a lot of time shooting and really know your rifle and then give the animal all the respect and put the bullet in the right spot.
Out in Nevada where I hunt its usually all open basins of Sage Brush and you can see where they go, unless your in Juniper tress or Aspen's.

Thats what makes all of this just that much more interesting.

G
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 08-26-2013, 08:22 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 212
Re: So whats wrong with the .243 on Deer?

I bought my wife a 243 due to the low recoil for her first gun. I would not have any regrets taking a 243 on a mule deer hunt at all. I know Texas white tail are a lot smaller but we used to plug them out to 400 and 500 yards with a 85 grain hollow point in a 243. Never ran to far and most dropped in there tracks. I had another friend that would do the same with a 22-250. I don't recall the grain weight of the bullet. I hand load the 95 grain bergers for the wife in her 243. She has yet to take a deer but we just got financely secure enough that she was able to quit teaching 3rd grade. I would also consider taking a 243 for a sheep hunt are anything in the 300-350 pound class and under type of animals. Deer, goats, sheep, etc. Maybe not a hog hunt for me but my cousin uses one on hogs down in Texas. He does a lot of head shots with it. So it works. He has shot one in the front shoulder and it went about 100 yards before going down so he will usually only do a head shot on a hog....But anyway mule deer. Sure thing. I would have to say I would use at least a 85 grain bullet or larger in my opnion.
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 08-26-2013, 08:42 PM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 50
Re: So whats wrong with the .243 on Deer?

^^ I also had a guy tell me the other day that a .308 was too small for hogs here in TX.

Heck some people in my neck of the woods also believe you need a 300 win mag to take whitetail at 150 yards to because they have seen so many deer "lost" to smaller calibers.

I dont trust 95% of what I hear in gunshops and at the range. Just saying.
Reply With Quote
  #28  
Old 08-29-2013, 10:38 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 4
Re: So whats wrong with the .243 on Deer?

Quote:
Originally Posted by 93trojan View Post
I think it's just preconceived notions on whether a gun/caliber is big enough. "When a deer gets away from a guy with a 270 or larger, it is obviously his fault.". If it is a "marginal" caliber, then it's the rifle's fault. The caliber gets blamed for a poorly placed shot. In actuality, it's almost always the shooter's fault. In rare cases, it's the bullet that fails....and that happens in any caliber. If you hit a deer anywhere in the chest with a .243, it will not go far at all.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Derek M. View Post

As to my own personal experience with a 270 (my favorite) and a 30.06, I've been fortunate to kill a lot of game in a lot of states. Can't remember any that took more than 1-2 steps at any distance and with any bullet.

243 kills fine, just not in the same manner in my experience which is limited.
My son has shot all his deer with a .243 I bought him. All were with 100 grain Remington corlokts or Federal red box. Broadside or front chest shots and none have taken more than a couple steps with most being bang flop. Exit wounds? Rarely, but the deer have never left the area they were shot.

Last year I shot a big buck with my .270 Win at a whopping 20 yards. The deer ran about 70 yards and piled up. Had I not been watching I probably would have lost him. There was no exit wound no blood trail. Upon inspection the bullet blew the heart completely to pieces and the bullet likely exploded due to the close shot and all the energy still in it.

What is my point? Even with a perfectly placed shot with a supposedly more worthy deer round my deer went 7 times further than any deer my son has shot with his .243.
My deer ran away on adrenaline and the oxygen still in his system. He was dead and didn't know it. I don't think all deer lost are because of bad shots or poor caliber choice, some have the will to survive and run off to die elsewhere. We just have to do our best to try find them. Waiting is the best thing we can do but sometimes it is easy to get caught up in it and forget to give them enough time to expire.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:44 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC