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Hunter-Landowner Relations

 
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  #8  
Old 11-14-2012, 08:53 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Miles City, Montana
Posts: 174
Re: Hunter-Landowner Relations

Quote:
Originally Posted by 257WTBY View Post
All good valid points and should be done.

I personally came out west from West Virginia to Washington in the early nineties. I have been here a while. I had a hard time finding places to hunt no one would allow me to hunt there was a old man that had a huge ranch about 20 min from my house. One day i was out knocking on doors and i had never asked to hunt this ranch. Anyway he had a yearling bull that was out in the raod with a few cows well i grew up on a farm back home so i did what i would do back there with neighbors and chased the cattle back in and put the fence up as best i could. I went to the ranch house and told the owner what i found and he paniced he said he had to get out there and get the cows back in i told him i did already and propped up the fence as best i could. I asked him if he would like me to help him fix it he said no he would do it I told him i was not having any luck today and told him i grew up on a cattle farm so we went and re strung the barbed wire and put a couple new t posts in. During the fence rebuild he was talking to me and i told him that i was out looking for somewhere to hunt as no one would let me have access. He took it all in when we were done he told me to come to the farm house and i did he went in and filled out a trespass slip and told me i was welcome to his ranch.

I went out with the wife a couple of times during the summer and offered to help out in any way in aprreciation for the access the farmer kept saying no. On one of the last trips of the summer there he had his big tractor in the shop and when i talked to him he was saying how exspensive it was going to be to get a clutch installed in it. I asked him to get the parts i would install it. He was hesitant but he did i installed the clutch the next weekend and he told everyone around all his rancher buddies now my wife and daughters have freedom to hunt several thousand acres and I still to this day help I run the combine for one rancher for a week every harvest season.

I just think like taking clothes out from Carolina to Wyoming for the family well people that live close can and SHOULD help anyway they can if they want the ranchers to give them access to hunt Every sportsmans should respect the land owner as well as the land that he owns and do their part so the next hunter asking has a chance to.

That's what I'm talking about. I just recently gained access to a ranch that encompasses almost 30 square miles, just by helping him gather cattle and building a windbreak in his corrals. Good on you Sir!
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  #9  
Old 11-27-2012, 08:51 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Central Montana
Posts: 105
Re: Hunter-Landowner Relations

A very well written thread sir! We own or lease over 10,000 acres in central Montana and hunter access is a big issue for us this time of year.
I can't stress enough how important showing up before the season matters, like WAY before the season starts! If you show up at my place around dinner time, walk up to my door, leave your pickup running and ask if you can "whack a couple of those deer i see you got runnin around" you are in for a rude reply and a NO. Issues with people driving off the road, leaving gates open and shooting the place up have forced us to almost totally shut down our property to the general public, keeping it for ourselves and family. As landowners we always appreciate anything from our hunters, especially after the season which shows that you continue to appreciate it even after you have have harvested game.

Another thing hunters can do to help their chances and i recomend for all of my Hunters Ed classes, is to go to Montana FWP and take the Hunter Land Stewardship test, which teaches about the ethics of asking for permission and using private land.
Thank you for a great thread!
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  #10  
Old 11-30-2012, 07:26 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Rapid City, SD
Posts: 156
Re: Hunter-Landowner Relations

I really enjoyed reading this thread! There is a lot of great information that I never thought about. I have always hunted public land since I don't own any myself. For the very first time recently, i have been informally invited to hunt with someone on his land. I hope that opportunity comes up and I will be sure to offer any time and service I can to show appreciation. Some day I hope to own my own land, and from that perspective, I can see why it is important for a hunter to really know how to communicate and deal with a landowner. I imagine there are more people than not that don't really do it right. I don't want to be one of them!
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  #11  
Old 12-02-2012, 05:04 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Townsend, Montana.
Posts: 7,812
Re: Hunter-Landowner Relations

Here is a look at some relations from the land owners view. We found these this morning. Left right in the middle of a gate going on the ranch. The carcasses of 2 cow elk and a doe mule deer. Purposely discarded for us to have to clean up and haul away. We get some of this every year, but most of the time they just toss it in a ditch from the road. This is a little much. I have the Game Warden coming to see what he thinks and maybe, just maybe, we can trace it to something or someone. It took me 3 years of talking to get the ranch owner to let me take elderly, disabled and first year hunters on the ranch the last week of season to get their elk. This was the second year I was allowed to do so. I promise you this ain't helping me one bit. I also just 2 days ago spent an hour or so picking up water bottles, beer cans, whiskey bottles coffee cups and you name it from our road. I do it every year after season closes. The road will remain pretty clean until next hunting season. So guys keep in mind if you run into a land owner that says Hell NO! maybe he is tired of cleaning up after the mobs of slob hunter. I know this is not the way most hunters roll, but I can tell you this kind of behavior will be remembered and have an affect on all of us as a whole.

Jeff



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  #12  
Old 12-03-2012, 03:22 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: saskatchewan canada
Posts: 172
Re: Hunter-Landowner Relations

So the same problem in USA happens in Canada too.I have had that problem too. To date two want a be (sportmen) have been caught on my posted land and the stocks or rilfe barrels bent when Someone was checking my cattle herd.No one has the right to bring firearms on privite own land.WITH OUT PERMISSION.
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  #13  
Old 12-03-2012, 05:19 PM
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Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: Hull UK
Posts: 8
Re: Hunter-Landowner Relations

Here in the UK, shooting/hunting on public land is strictly prohibited, so hunters are forced to get permission from landowners. As a result, we tend to be very careful about how we treat 'our permissions' and it is guarded and protected very jealously!
We make a point of reporting any damage we find, any strangers, or (un)occupied vehicles.
We also make a point of helping out 'our landowners' where possible, for example, just tonight, I managed to get one of 'my landowners' who runs a horse stud, in contact with another stud farm who is going out of business, and needed homes for 52 thoroughbreds.
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  #14  
Old 12-03-2012, 09:19 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: saskatchewan canada
Posts: 172
Re: Hunter-Landowner Relations

[QUOTE=teabag;726579]Here in the UK, shooting/hunting on public land is strictly prohibited, so hunters are forced to get permission from landowners. As a result, we tend to be very careful about how we treat 'our permissions' and it is guarded and protected very jealously!
We make a point of reporting any damage we find, any strangers, or (un)occupied vehicles.
We also make a point of helping out 'our landowners' where possible, for example, just tonight, I managed to get one of 'my landowners' who runs a horse stud, in contact with another stud farm who is going out of business, and needed homes for 52 thoroughbreds.[/QUOTE
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