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Washing your Meat?

 
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  #8  
Old 07-15-2010, 09:59 PM
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Re: Washing your Meat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by phorwath View Post
The garbage bags I use aren't scented or chemically treated. I typically use the large garbage bags that I see in use for trash pick-up along our highways in Alaska. And I use an even heavier grade of garbage bag that is used for the collection and disposal of hazardous materials, and personal protective gear worn during hazardous substance response & cleanup operations, when I can find them.

While backpacking, without the use of plastic bags to transport field-dressed and field-butchered meat out of the field and back to civilization, how would you keep from soiling your backpack, clothing, tent, and hunting and camping gear with the blood and drainage associated with the meat? Anyone know of a source of heavy duty 33-gallon food grade plastic bags?

Call them garbage bags, or trash bags, I haven't come across any better ideas when the game has to be transported on my back from the kill site back to the vehicle or airstrip, and I'm overnighting along the way in the middle of grizzly, brown, and black bear country. Not to mention the wolves, coyotes, fox, and wolverine.

Somebody got a better idea? I'd like to learn of it.
Any colored bag is not cool for meat, you want the clear bags. The colored and scented bags will make things funky but not really spoiled. I used to use cape bags from a taxidermy supply store, they were huge and rugged and clear. It has been to long to remember what store though but I'll do some looking to see if I can find were a guy could order the right stuff.

Anything is better than becoming bear poop though!!
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  #9  
Old 07-15-2010, 10:14 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,384
Re: Washing your Meat?

If I have to pack an animal out I use the clear drum liners that are used for food products
to keep the blood off of my pack and clothes and if you have to stay in the woods a while

You can immerse the heavy bags in a cold mountain stream to cool it down, but dont let the
water get in the bag. (You can rig a pole across the stream and hang the bags from it).

The sooner I can get it in an ice chest with lots of cold water the better. This softens any blood
and ages the meat at the same time with out spoilage.

Natural streams are full of bacteria from all sorts of beast and should not be drank or used
to wash meat off.

There is nothing worse than wild game that has not been taken care of properly.

J E CUSTOM
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  #10  
Old 07-15-2010, 11:13 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: West Central Idaho
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Re: Washing your Meat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by phorwath View Post
The garbage bags I use aren't scented or chemically treated. I typically use the large garbage bags that I see in use for trash pick-up along our highways in Alaska. And I use an even heavier grade of garbage bag that is used for the collection and disposal of hazardous materials, and personal protective gear worn during hazardous substance response & cleanup operations, when I can find them.

While backpacking, without the use of plastic bags to transport field-dressed and field-butchered meat out of the field and back to civilization, how would you keep from soiling your backpack, clothing, tent, and hunting and camping gear with the blood and drainage associated with the meat? Anyone know of a source of heavy duty 33-gallon food grade plastic bags?

Call them garbage bags, or trash bags, I haven't come across any better ideas when the game has to be transported on my back from the kill site back to the vehicle or airstrip, and I'm overnighting along the way in the middle of grizzly, brown, and black bear country. Not to mention the wolves, coyotes, fox, and wolverine.

Somebody got a better idea? I'd like to learn of it.

I used plastic garbage bags the heavy duty 30 gal garden type all the time early on and they worked well except they trap whatever heat that is left in the meat so I switched to the cloth bags. If you lay the meat out for awhile there is not a lot of draining so the pack does not get too screwed up.

A good point about grizzly country though and I understand your thinking about keeping clean and the odors down. Would do the same if in your situation. Don’t need no teed off grizzly looking for lunch
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  #11  
Old 07-16-2010, 01:40 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: AB, Canada
Posts: 555
Re: Washing your Meat?

Neverr washed the meat on field.
If I do a kill in the cold temp +8Celsius or bellow, I remove the skin and hang up on tree tiil I finished hunting and prepare to go home.
on the day of living I deboned the meat, put it on cooler and head home.
Home I can wash/clean the meat and baggit on ziplock and ready to go on deepfreezer.

If I do a kill in hot weather +15 and up, and have to stay more days 2-3 days, i just remove the guts, cut the ribs cavity (opened up to neck) insert a spacer or pice of wood to hold it spread and laid down on belly on the grass, on shadow and cover it up with2-3 branches.
Newer lost any meat in this way., The hide keeps flyes away and cool down the heat, and over night it keeps cool air from the ground inside and cools the meat.
I learned this technique from a eldermen hunter few years ago, and works like a charm.
The trick is to open the chest cavity and laid down the game with belly down and DO NOT REMOVE THE SKIN. (of course you have to remove the guts, and all the inside of chest cavity and the neck pipe up to lower jaw.
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  #12  
Old 07-16-2010, 04:52 PM
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Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: West Central Idaho
Posts: 1,081
Re: Washing your Meat?

Quote:
Originally Posted by 300rum View Post
Neverr washed the meat on field.
If I do a kill in the cold temp +8Celsius or bellow, I remove the skin and hang up on tree tiil I finished hunting and prepare to go home.
on the day of living I deboned the meat, put it on cooler and head home.
Home I can wash/clean the meat and baggit on ziplock and ready to go on deepfreezer.

If I do a kill in hot weather +15 and up, and have to stay more days 2-3 days, i just remove the guts, cut the ribs cavity (opened up to neck) insert a spacer or pice of wood to hold it spread and laid down on belly on the grass, on shadow and cover it up with2-3 branches.
Newer lost any meat in this way., The hide keeps flyes away and cool down the heat, and over night it keeps cool air from the ground inside and cools the meat.
I learned this technique from a eldermen hunter few years ago, and works like a charm.
The trick is to open the chest cavity and laid down the game with belly down and DO NOT REMOVE THE SKIN. (of course you have to remove the guts, and all the inside of chest cavity and the neck pipe up to lower jaw.

Just want to add something taught to me years ago. When in warm weather and you have to leave the animal for awhile do as 300rum describes above and if there is any “Bay Leaf” growing wild where you’re hunting break a couple small branches with the leaves on and put them in the chest cavity. Flies won’t come near it.
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There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the inside of a man. Sir Winston Churchill.

Everything that is really great and inspiring is created by the individual who can labor in freedom. Einstein
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  #13  
Old 07-17-2010, 10:58 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Northern CA
Posts: 38
Re: Washing your Meat?

Meat spoilage is greatly accelerated from heat and moisture. One of the two can be dealt with, but both together can make a mess quickly. I don't wash meat until I am home. In the field, I debone everything except the hams (the leg bone is light and deboning it in the field tends to ruin a lot of meat). I place the meat in cotton game bags and hang it during the night. During the day, I take the meat into the tent, lay it out on the game bags turned inside out so the pieces are not touching so it dries somewhat, and bag it up to hang again at night. The frist time I hung a bag of boned meat for three days and left it, it got a white, sticky slime on the outside much like elmers glue. That was the last. I have kept meat in the backcountry for as long as a week with the hang/tent method and it works great.
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