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Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

 
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  #22  
Old 02-13-2013, 11:34 AM
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Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 464
Re: Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtnwrunner View Post
Yeah, well, you'll never have to pay alimony to a nalgene bottle......................

Hey, did you get your cow?

Randy
Touche! thats like getting punched in the face after getting kicked in the nutts! good job randy! funny as hell.

no cow but saw some. 5 degrees and 35 mph winds. oh and the girl I was referring to was with me the entire time! pretty cool. she even wanted to pack it out!

How is the ranch? If you could ever fence in one of those elk and tranquilize it for me I would be more than happy to come over and shoot it for you! haha.
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  #23  
Old 02-14-2013, 04:38 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Corvallis, Montana
Posts: 115
Re: Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

I do most all my hunting via backpacking. Montana's Western Rockies are never warm at night either. I am partial to Marmot bags simply because I've never had a cold night in them. Forget the "down doesn't keep you warm when wet" because neither does synthetic. Keep your sleeping bag dry.

I would go with a minimum 800 fill down...850 is better. There are actually less feathers in the higher fill power but they are better quality and pack smaller, lighter as well.

Make sure and get a quality insulated pad as others have said. Some bags have very little down on the bottom to save weight. I don't use those types because I sleep in a hammock and it requires plenty of insulation at any pressure points.

Water resistant down bags are hitting the market now as well. I've just got my first one (Marmut Col MemBrain) and is something to consider.

I doubt you would ever get cold in a:
  • Marmot Lithium MemBrain Long...rated at 0 degrees F...850 fill down
  • Western Mountaineering Lynx GWS...-10 F...850 fill down
  • Big Agnes Hahns Peak...-20 F...800 fill down...X-Long and wide 3 lbs 6 oz
There are others but those three are all very good bags. I use a Marmot Sawtooth...15 F in the summer and Marmut Col MemBrain...-20 F in late fall, early spring and winter.
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  #24  
Old 02-16-2013, 04:50 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 6
Re: Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

Lotsa good advice. Here's my 2 cents: If your're sleeping on a cot, that tells me your sleeping in a tent where you drive to. So, weight isn't an issue. Get a full zip rectangular synthetic bag rated to zero. You'll have room to spare and can unzip if its too hot. Sleep in a Full width air pad and your good for whatever comes your way.

If weight is an issue (your're packing or carrying the bag) you need to look at "sleep systems", not just a bag.
1. A sleep system starts with a mat/pad. I use a REI Lite-core 1.5 mummy full length in all expected weather conditions. NEO is good also and IF your a gram counter is best.
2. Next I wear ultra-lite synthetic long underwear-full sleeves/socks/hat. These are used only for sleeping and weigh less than 4 oz. Don't wear anything you hiked around in to bed. Even IF you think its dry, its not and will cause you to become cold. This is where most people screw up, they wear outside cloths in the bag.
3. Sleeping bag. I have 3, all Down. I have Go-lite 40 deg bag that weights 1lb 5 oz and packs smaller than my pad. With my system it will comfortably take me down to 30 degs. This whole system weighs less than 2 lbs! Great for Archery seasons.
I have a Western Mountaineering Alpinlite 20 deg bag. With my system its good for 10 degs.
Next I have a Kelty Ignite drydown 0 degs bag. This is better than the WM(check it out) and half the cost. This bag will take me down to past zero, at which point I'm going home.

If you don't have a sleep system try it and I guarantee you will sleep much warmer...or your money back
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  #25  
Old 02-25-2013, 10:20 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 27
Re: Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

Wiggies bag is a great choice. I also use a goretex bivy bag. I have logged over a 100 days winter camping in the Rockies. Just my 2 cents
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  #26  
Old 02-26-2013, 12:19 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Phillips Wisconsin
Posts: 3
Re: Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

I started backpacking into the mountains over 30 years ago for mid and late elk hunts. There are some great ideas on here, but the "system" method is the only one that is going to guarantee success. Also listen to the guys who sleep out in the backyard before they go. You wouldn't go without your rifle lined in at home would you?

Here is my 2 cent for a backpack in system I use to this day, bear with me when I repeat the wisdom of others.

1) Get an ultra lite backpacking waterproof, well ventilated bivy. Backpacking websites will list the best of the past and present. You may not use it, but if it rains your bag and you are in heaven. Plus it adds a couple degrees to your system and greatly reduces wind chill.

2) Get a great insulated pad, the warmer the better. It is the foundation your system is built on. Cold bottom, Cold body! Remember air pads cool you down.
a) If you have back issues, there are ultra lite titanium (3#'s) cots that are 5 inches off the ground, out there for Backpackers at about $250. They are designed to fit in a bivy, I always use mine. You can get away with a less heavy pad also, because of the uniformity of the cot.

3) Always have a silk or poly bag liner. No exceptions. Not only will it keep your bag clean and dryer, but it will add 5 to 10 degree to your bag for only 6-8 ounces.

4) IF you have a bag you like, keep it and put it into the system. IF not, any of the great bags mentioned will work.

5) Always dry out any bag to the best of your ability, daily. Even opened and fluffed up in a ventilated waterproof bivy is better than nothing. One thing to remember is to hang it up HiDDEN in a tree if it is above freezing and not raining while hunting. Wind is a hell of a dryer, even when it is cold.

6) Listen to the fella that said always use a set of poly/silk underwear ONLY for sleeping. Hard core backpackers, where ounces count, would never be caught dead without them. They bring two if they are worried about perspiration and not being able to keep them dry. They also wear separate poly socks and hats for sleeping ONLY. They are extremely important, no exceptions.

7) Finally, this little 4 oz, $10 item has made what could have been hell, heaven, several times. An aluminum survival blanket or bag liner. I use the blanket because it is more versatile, inside next to my poly sleeping ONLY underwear if necessary. It will trap moisture, but it will keep you and your bags dry. If you are using it at this point, god has thrown you a curve ball and you will care less if you have to dry your poly underwear. Of course the blanket dries with a flip in the air since it absorbs nothing. I have used it over the top of bags also to keep several people warm in a crisis. DON'T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT ONE!!

The system will keep you warm from 40 degrees to 20 below just by mixing and matching the components and staying dry. A told my system without the poly sleeping only clothing weighs in at 14# -7 ounces and I can go anywhere sleep anywhere. If you are younger and a lot nimbler than me you could get a couple #'s lighter yet. Good Luck to you.
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  #27  
Old 02-26-2013, 10:10 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 1
Re: Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

I have found that a cheap emergency blanket. The real light ones found in emergency kits. When used inside your sleeping bag helps a lot without much weight
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  #28  
Old 02-27-2013, 01:05 AM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 464
Re: Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

Quote:
Originally Posted by WisLRH View Post
I started backpacking into the mountains over 30 years ago for mid and late elk hunts. There are some great ideas on here, but the "system" method is the only one that is going to guarantee success. Also listen to the guys who sleep out in the backyard before they go. You wouldn't go without your rifle lined in at home would you?

Here is my 2 cent for a backpack in system I use to this day, bear with me when I repeat the wisdom of others.

1) Get an ultra lite backpacking waterproof, well ventilated bivy. Backpacking websites will list the best of the past and present. You may not use it, but if it rains your bag and you are in heaven. Plus it adds a couple degrees to your system and greatly reduces wind chill.

2) Get a great insulated pad, the warmer the better. It is the foundation your system is built on. Cold bottom, Cold body! Remember air pads cool you down.
a) If you have back issues, there are ultra lite titanium (3#'s) cots that are 5 inches off the ground, out there for Backpackers at about $250. They are designed to fit in a bivy, I always use mine. You can get away with a less heavy pad also, because of the uniformity of the cot.

3) Always have a silk or poly bag liner. No exceptions. Not only will it keep your bag clean and dryer, but it will add 5 to 10 degree to your bag for only 6-8 ounces.

4) IF you have a bag you like, keep it and put it into the system. IF not, any of the great bags mentioned will work.

5) Always dry out any bag to the best of your ability, daily. Even opened and fluffed up in a ventilated waterproof bivy is better than nothing. One thing to remember is to hang it up HiDDEN in a tree if it is above freezing and not raining while hunting. Wind is a hell of a dryer, even when it is cold.

6) Listen to the fella that said always use a set of poly/silk underwear ONLY for sleeping. Hard core backpackers, where ounces count, would never be caught dead without them. They bring two if they are worried about perspiration and not being able to keep them dry. They also wear separate poly socks and hats for sleeping ONLY. They are extremely important, no exceptions.

7) Finally, this little 4 oz, $10 item has made what could have been hell, heaven, several times. An aluminum survival blanket or bag liner. I use the blanket because it is more versatile, inside next to my poly sleeping ONLY underwear if necessary. It will trap moisture, but it will keep you and your bags dry. If you are using it at this point, god has thrown you a curve ball and you will care less if you have to dry your poly underwear. Of course the blanket dries with a flip in the air since it absorbs nothing. I have used it over the top of bags also to keep several people warm in a crisis. DON'T LEAVE HOME WITHOUT ONE!!

The system will keep you warm from 40 degrees to 20 below just by mixing and matching the components and staying dry. A told my system without the poly sleeping only clothing weighs in at 14# -7 ounces and I can go anywhere sleep anywhere. If you are younger and a lot nimbler than me you could get a couple #'s lighter yet. Good Luck to you.
14.5 lbs is a lot. My hilleberg 4 season tent (nallo 2 gt), 10 deg quilt, and exped downmat ul 7 med only weigh 8.5 lbs. all of my cooking, water filtration and extra clotes dont even weigh the 6 extra lbs to equal your setup. I say if you are cold sleep in your long johns and down coat. 14.5 lbs is a ton for a sleeping system.
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