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Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

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  #8  
Unread 01-31-2013, 01:14 AM
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Re: Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

You might look into a quilt instead. I wont go back to a sleeping bag. Try enlightened equipment. Tim is awesome to deal with.
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  •   #9  
    Unread 01-31-2013, 02:20 AM
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    Join Date: Feb 2002
    Location: Wyoming, USA
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    Re: Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by midnightmalloy View Post
    You might look into a quilt instead. I wont go back to a sleeping bag. Try enlightened equipment. Tim is awesome to deal with.
    Interesting stuff. I'm intrigued now and will have to research quilts further. I wasn't aware of quilts designed that could facilitate truly cold weather camping. Might be a nice option for additional comfort as well as the very attractive portability.

    Thanks for the post.
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      #10  
    Unread 01-31-2013, 09:14 AM
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    Join Date: May 2009
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    Re: Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

    There is a very good deal on a 20 deg. feathered Friends bag,T I Goat bivy and Kifaru stuff sack on rocslide classifieds
    Tim
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      #11  
    Unread 01-31-2013, 10:48 PM
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    Join Date: May 2009
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    Re: Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

    Look very hard at the Feathered Friends bags which are made in Seattle. They make a semi rectangular down bag for those who are bigger or want more room than a mummy bag. Before you go to bed, heat a water bottle to boiling, put it in a heavy sock and put it in the bottom of your bag---it will keep you warm and toasty. If you eat right before you go to bed and it is really cold out, eat butter. Man, it is amazing how that stuff warms you up. I always did this when I used to mountaineer and put a half a cube in a freeze dried food meal and it always works. Another thing that works is warm jello.

    Randy
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      #12  
    Unread 01-31-2013, 11:47 PM
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    Join Date: Jun 2010
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    Re: Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mtnwrunner View Post
    Look very hard at the Feathered Friends bags which are made in Seattle. They make a semi rectangular down bag for those who are bigger or want more room than a mummy bag. Before you go to bed, heat a water bottle to boiling, put it in a heavy sock and put it in the bottom of your bag---it will keep you warm and toasty. If you eat right before you go to bed and it is really cold out, eat butter. Man, it is amazing how that stuff warms you up. I always did this when I used to mountaineer and put a half a cube in a freeze dried food meal and it always works. Another thing that works is warm jello.

    Randy
    Dang randy you always have some darn good advice. Instead of bringing a how water bottle I will bring my hot girlfriend! haha! keeps me a little warmer! I took her elk hunting in wyoming this past late december in 35mph winds, 5 degrees at 9k ft and she loved it. Now she wants to go with me on all my trips! I dont think it gets better than that...oh and she said she would be happy to help me pack one out! yea, a little better than a how nalgene I think!
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      #13  
    Unread 02-01-2013, 04:44 PM
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    Join Date: May 2012
    Location: St. Louis
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    Re: Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

    I'm going through the process of "field testing" in my back yard right now, so I'll throw in my 2 cents...

    First, you must have an appropriate pad or you can throw everything else out the window. In my ignorance I suffered through the Colorado 1st Rifle Season on a Thermarest Ridgerest and that will not happen again. This winter I tested the new Thermarest Neoair Xtherm with an "R value" of 5.7 in temps of about 12 F. From a warmth perspective, I believe this pad could handle anything the Colorado Rockies could dish out. Even the largest version is unbelievably light at just a shade over a pound. Unfortunately I broke my back a few years ago and the loft of this pad (2.5") just wasn't quite enough for me and I made the switch to the considerably heavier but thicker and warmer Exped DownMat 9. It's rated to something like -38 F so you could consider it overkill, but it's the only one they have with 3.5" of loft and my back insisted.

    As for the bag, I will agree with the folks that say spend the money on a good down bag. The one I have right now is a Marmot Couloir, rated at 0 F, but "EN Tested" at something like -2 F, meaning that it should actually be comfortable at that temp, not just "you will survive at that temp". I've had it down to about 10 F on top of the Exped and I have no complaints from above. I didn't have the pad tightly inflated so I did have some cold spots underneath while sleeping on my side--another lesson learned.

    Something to consider with down bags is that you perspire 24x7 whether you realize it or not and eventually, unless you manaage to dry your bag out well every day or two, that perspiration will condense in your down and make it less efficient. I'll be heading out for about a week without any guarantee I'll be able to dry my bag out each day, so I recently ordered a set of vapor barrier clothes from Warmlite. This will do a few things...1) Keep my bag dry so I get maximum insulation each night, 2) VB clothes actually add 5-10 deg just like a bag liner someone else mentioned, and 3) if it gets REALLY nasty, I can wear my down jacket, heavy socks, etc to bed without all the perspiration effects on those clothes. So then you have a little dual-purpose insurance policy if the weather really turns bad. The down jacket when you first wake up or while sitting around making dinner at night can also make all the difference between shivering uncontrollably and being comfortable. It also weighs next to nothing.

    In the end, everyone has to work out a system that works for them, but there are some points to consider. The biggest thing I would say--wait for the mercury to drop and test it out in your back yard. It's helped me immensely.
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      #14  
    Unread 02-01-2013, 05:06 PM
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    Join Date: Oct 2010
    Location: Talkeetna, Alaska
    Posts: 220
    Re: Sleeping bag advice for spike camping

    Down bags are light, warm and absolutely worthless if they get wet. If you are hunting/camping in an area where getting wet is likely or even somewhat likely stay away from down. A good synthetic bag will be in the 90% plus efficiency range when they are soaked. A down bag that is soaked is 2 layers of ripstop nylon with a clump of down in each tube and hard to get properly dried. I like Wiggy's bags.

    Gus
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