Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Hunting > Backpack Hunting


Reply

Packing in vs. out

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-21-2009, 09:45 PM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Wenatchee, WA
Posts: 804
Packing in vs. out

Hello there - please bear with the newbie questions (regarding backpacking and such) I grew up on a ranch with a freezer full of beef, and deer literally walking through the yard, so I didn't do much big game hunting back then. Since then... the few times I've gone hunting (and dropped something) it was typically somewhere that a reasonably motivated person could drag/carry a deer to someplace accessible by vehicle. After a nice weekend hike w/ the wife and plenty of time to think whilst on the trail... I got to thinking, and thought to myself - how in the hell would you get an animal back *out* of here (4+ miles in from Cottonwood - basically the 'end of the road' on the Entiat River road) - and thats not even that rough of a trail! Don't have a horse, and don't plan on getting one just to go hunting

I've been kinda interested in trying backpack hunting for a while now - if nothing else, to simply get away from the 'road' hunters from the coast. Problem is... I normally hunt solo when I hunt big game at all, and by the time I tally up everything I think I would need to make do in the great outdoors for even just a couple days 'roughing it'... my Kelty Redwing 3100 pack is getting pretty full. Then I get to thinkin'... assuming I *do* manage to drop an animal... how many friggin' trips is it going to take to get the meat, the hide, the antlers, etc. back out, even if I had a bigger pack?

Do you guys who backpack hunt typically hunt in teams (two, three, more?) and split the load going in and share the load coming out? Do you just take select cuts and maybe the rack and leave the rest of the carcass for the coyotes (they have to eat too!) ? Or do you just keep making multiple trips back and forth? Seems like keeping the remants clean and not gnawed on would present a problem?

Sorry if this seems like beginner 101 questions. Figured you guys might have the answers if anyone does.

TIA,

Monte
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-21-2009, 10:57 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Elko, NV
Posts: 461
Re: Packing in vs. out

I bone them out. I have a Kifaru Freighter that carries more than my knee's will handle. If I had to buy a new pack today, I'd get an Eberlestock J104. They are very comfortable and hold lots of meat. Both packs will handle an entire boned out mule deer in one load. You'll have to take 4-6 trips if you kill an Elk solo (not easy, not fun and not recommended).

Where I live (Nevada) it's illegal to take the choice cuts and horns and leave the rest. I think most states have similar laws.

If it's too late to pack it out or will take more than one trip, put your coat or shirt on the carcass to keep the lions & coyotes away.

If it's warm, be careful. It's easy to ruin the meat. Don't kill something in the backcountry if you can't get it out before it goes bad.


Paul
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-21-2009, 11:15 PM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Wenatchee, WA
Posts: 804
Re: Packing in vs. out

Paul,

Thanks for the response. The bit about using extra clothes - and the human scent - to keep animals away from your kill sounds like a great idea. Please note, I wasn't advocating any of the methods I mentioned, simply inquiring what is 'normal' and/or legal. Good to know that it's not legal in some areas to 'cherry pick' from the carcass. Seems like kind of a wasted effort anyway.

Monte
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-22-2009, 04:02 AM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 1,047
Re: Packing in vs. out

+1 on what Paul says.

Also what I do is pack in a lot of my gear weeks ahead of my main hunt and set up a stash. I also allow plenty of time for the hunt and the meat recovery. Its no good shooting a big animal way back in the scrub if you have to be back at work the next day.

If I shoot something then I take as many trips as it takes to get it all out!!!

The important thing is to get the meat out fast. Don't worry about your equipment. Just hide it in your stash and come back and get it some other day. That way you can carry the maximum amount of meat out each trip.

Also you can pack one load out, then drive home and pick up the missus. Hike her back in and use her to help carry some meat out. It is sure to be a bonding experience LOL
__________________
scientia est potentia
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-22-2009, 11:16 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 2
Re: Packing in vs. out

A wheel or wheels is the answer to the frieght problem. I have a wheel on my camp trails frame pack that I can put on for trails or take off for rough terain. A company in montana or idaho makes a one wheel two man cart for taking out the meat. North vietnam transported a lot of war materials to the south using bicycles. A loaded bike pushed by a man walking beside with an extention on one handlebar for steering control.
A few years ago I saw an ad for an outfit called a mule which was a pack with a wheel to carry 100lbs. I cannot find it on line now.

If you are going to stay over night you need a light weight shelter with a centerpole chimney/stove you can make yourself. Check out my post on this forum or google chimpac or centerpole chimney for arguments on other forums.

Last edited by chimpac; 06-22-2009 at 11:24 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-22-2009, 12:00 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Elko, NV
Posts: 461
Re: Packing in vs. out

Quote:
Originally Posted by chimpac View Post
A wheel or wheels is the answer to the frieght problem. I have a wheel on my camp trails frame pack that I can put on for trails or take off for rough terain. A company in montana or idaho makes a one wheel two man cart for taking out the meat. North vietnam transported a lot of war materials to the south using bicycles. A loaded bike pushed by a man walking beside with an extention on one handlebar for steering control.
A few years ago I saw an ad for an outfit called a mule which was a pack with a wheel to carry 100lbs. I cannot find it on line now.
Wheels and carts work great but you can't use them in a wilderness area.

Paul
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-22-2009, 05:35 PM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 79
Re: Packing in vs. out

For me, prescouting, preplacement of gear, team hunting and high camps are the solution. Base camp down by the truck. Before season starts I pack minimal gear for a 3 day stay to the ridgelines. We go up and come down the mountain as needed. We generally stay for 24-36 hours at 10000 ft or above (hunting) and then take a break down the hill for a day or so.

But don't think all the good ones are that difficult. I have seen record bucks push into the lowlands during the season. Those old experienced deer are smart.

The day or two before opening day I am already above or at the level of the game. One hunter harvests and the other helps pack the meat to the high camp or to the low camp depending upon what time of day we are finished deboning.

I bone it out and backpack out all the meat - and antlers if it is a buck. I prefer the Eberlestock J-107 series backpacks. Several of my other friends use other style packs. All have benefits and drawbacks. It's tough.

One thing about the packs that is rarely covered. Purchase one that has a quiet material. The canvas and codura packs are really durable, but the deer will hear you at quite some distance with that material scraping against the bushes and trees. A soft exterior minimizes the scraping noise. A removeable waist pack is helpful. You can drop and mark the main pack and stalk a bit closer with the basics (permit, Binocs, rangefinder, etc..) with a waist pack.

Following a harvest it is generally a two day job-at least- to recover the meat and high camp gear back to base camp or a freezer in the nearest town (generally at least 60 miles away).

Don't let anyone snooker you into thinking it is enjoyable. It's one of those events I love to hate. High alpine hunting it is the most exhausting, frustrating, thrilling and fulfilling activity I have ever pursued.

I know many in this forum are hell bent on taking that 1000 yard shot and that may work well in the flat lands where a truck or ATV can get you to the kill. But, out here in the mountains, remember, if you shoot it at 1000 yds across the canyon...you have to go retrieve it.

I am glad I have the opportunity to pursue this sport before my age catches up.

Last edited by Nvhunter; 06-22-2009 at 05:38 PM. Reason: Corrected spelling
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads for: Packing in vs. out
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Guns your packing in with?? lazylabs Backpack Hunting 74 07-22-2012 10:34 PM
Packing new heat! FrontierGander Muzzleloader Hunting 4 07-13-2011 10:28 PM
'packing with a sidearm TheRoaminRaider Backpack Hunting 4 08-19-2010 07:35 PM
Tripod for packing? Blacktail Backpack Hunting 23 02-07-2010 10:44 PM
Spotting Scope for Packing? Propdoc03 Long Range Scopes and Other Optics 8 07-13-2008 05:57 PM

Current Poll
In the last 12 months, what was your longest rifle kill on big game?
0 to 200 yards - 26.01%
1,546 Vote
201 to 400 yards - 32.16%
1,912 Vote
401 to 600 yards - 23.03%
1,369 Vote
601 to 800 yards - 10.03%
596 Votes
801 to 1,000 yards - 3.89%
231 Votes
Over 1,000 yards - 4.89%
291 Votes
Total Votes: 5,945
You may not vote on this poll.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC