Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Hunting > Backpack Hunting


Reply

Pack Llama

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-12-2013, 09:36 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: southwest, montana
Posts: 3
Pack Llama

After much research into what would be the best pack animal for the type of hunting that I do. I decided that Llamas were the animal that fitted the need that I had. In my research I found that an organization had been formed to preserve the classic Llama. During my research i had found that a lot of llama breeding had been done to alpacas to provide a woolier animal. This trait is undesirable in a pack llama, with the extra wool also came changes to the body conformation of the llama. these changes were not desirable in the working llama.

I have read many forums topics on peoples experience about packing with llamas. It seemed that most people that had positive experience were renting the llamas or had bought them from a breeder that was breeding specifically for the working llama conformation.

I researched llama breeders and found that not many breeders sell there llamas because most of the people breeding them had an outfitting business and used there crias to replace old packers in their stings. I was able to find a breeder in Wyoming that was down sizing his herd and had a few to sell.

I bought three will be two year old males from him to train. I have had them for three weeks now and they have been super easy to take care of and work with on training. I am looking forward to some mountain lake pack trips with them this summer.








Pack Llama-img_20130401_100837-1-.jpg

Pack Llama-img_20130402_191144_984-1-.jpg
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-12-2013, 10:19 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Blackfoot, Idaho
Posts: 8,205
Re: Pack Llama

Congrats!!

I went through the same process but ended up with goats.

You'll enjoy not having to carry so much stuff your self.

Plus, a tethered pack llama or goat can't be considered a live decoy. A big plus when woofin.

Keep us posted on your progress and adventures.
__________________
I may be the slowest guy on the mountain . . . . but . . . . I'm on the mountain!
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-13-2013, 07:56 AM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 63
Re: Pack Llama

Sounds like a great idea! I saw this a few months back and it is interesting as well Packing My Ass once I strap a weeks worth of gear to my back and head up hill I think about all those options.But after the season is over I'm glad I don't have any more animals to take care of
Tim
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-13-2013, 09:37 AM
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Casper, Wyoming
Posts: 70
Re: Pack Llama

I read about a guy in Alaska using yaks like they do in Asia.

I think the problem with Yak and Goats is that if you are hunting a cattle leased piece of BLM the rancher could accuse you of livestock tresspass.

Maybe I am just getting my panties in a wad, but it is something to look into.

Call the Game Warden, BLM Ranger and Forest Service LEO.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-13-2013, 03:48 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Blackfoot, Idaho
Posts: 8,205
Re: Pack Llama

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaska_Seth View Post
I read about a guy in Alaska using yaks like they do in Asia.

I think the problem with Yak and Goats is that if you are hunting a cattle leased piece of BLM the rancher could accuse you of livestock tresspass.

Maybe I am just getting my panties in a wad, but it is something to look into.

Call the Game Warden, BLM Ranger and Forest Service LEO.
Yep, ur panties are wadded up.

The Yak may be a problem due possible diseases that could affect cattle.
Goats are no problem. Cattlemen recognize that they don't compete w/cattle for forage. Many cattlemen use them for weed control.

Llamas are plentyful around here. There is a glut due to the initial interest but for some reason it has waned.

The smaller the pack animal the smaller the resources necessary for support.

One can haul 5-6 goats in what it takes to haul a couple of burros or llamas. No feed is necessary to be packed for goats and I suppose llamas.

Weed free hay is necessary to be packed for burros and horses.

Llamas and most donkeys need to be lead. Goats simply trail along, browse and keep you in sight.

Goats don't like crossing water and have to be trained to do so. Same for some donkeys and horses though most probably not as much trouble as goats. But once its done its done. Don't know about llamas.

Fences need to be better for goats than others unless electric is used.

A ton of hay keeps three growing goats butter ball fat over a long winter. My horse(s) went through a ton a month each.

Goats seem to go a couple of days w/o water. Depends on moisture in browse.

Some goats need their hair clipped. Most purebreds don't.

I don't think Llama's feet need trimmed. Goats are easy. Burros are onle a little more difficult.
__________________
I may be the slowest guy on the mountain . . . . but . . . . I'm on the mountain!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-13-2013, 06:17 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: southwest, montana
Posts: 3
Re: Pack Llama

3 llamas can be hauled in a half ton truck with a stock rack. 4 llamas would be better for a 3/4 ton with a long box.

Llamas browse along the way and can eat almost any type of plant. There are a few plants that are poisonous if eaten by a llama.

I'm a fan of having control of the animal that I am in the woods with. That way if your walking up the trail and hear an elk bugle I am able to tie the animal up and go hunt it without the interference of the pack animal.

There llamas will eat about 1.5 - 2 tons of hay a winter with summer grass.

Llamas can go two to three days without water as they are part if the camelid family.

The classic working llama that the Ccara organization is working to preserve is a shedding animal with guard hairs. With a coat like this shearing is not required.

Llamas feet need to be trimmed in the spring and potentially the fall depending on the type of terrain that they are packed in.

A llama can pack 1/3 of its weight with the average packing llama in the 300- 400 pound range. Packing this much is not advised until they are 3.5-4. Most pack llamas will be able to pack until they are 17-20.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-17-2013, 01:37 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: NM
Posts: 180
Re: Pack Llama

Can a Llama keep up with a horse?
The reason i ask is because we hunt several different ways, but mostly on foot or horse. I'd love to have a pack animal that can follow me on foot in the rugged stuff, but it would be a real bonus if it could follow when horseback and not get left in the dust. I've never been around one so I have no idea how fast they walk.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC