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Need advice for Colorado elk hunt

 
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  #50  
Old 06-15-2013, 07:57 PM
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Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: granite falls wa
Posts: 29
Re: Need advice for Colorado elk hunt

You can say what ever you like, but I have been a mountaineer and a guide for over 10 years. I have not only witnessed how well it works but have used it myself. I also must add for hardly any money you can save yourself for altitude sickness but if you don't think it will work or it sounds foolish them your on your own.
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  #51  
Old 06-15-2013, 09:48 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Fairview Alfa, Louisiana
Posts: 203
Re: Need advice for Colorado elk hunt

Quote:
Originally Posted by elkdude01 View Post
You can say what ever you like, but I have been a mountaineer and a guide for over 10 years. I have not only witnessed how well it works but have used it myself. I also must add for hardly any money you can save yourself for altitude sickness but if you don't think it will work or it sounds foolish them your on your own.
I have never had any debilitating symptoms hunting around 10k I start a diet and exercise program on July 1 to try in be in the best shape I can but I would love to know what I could do to have more wind to limit the number of stops required to catch my breath. I will certanly ask my doctor about a pill that will help. Any other suggestions for preparing physically to hunt the high country is appreciated.
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  #52  
Old 06-16-2013, 07:07 PM
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Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 8
Re: Need advice for Colorado elk hunt

Coachj,

I'm going to give you some specific advice that I hope you find helpful. Before I do I want you to swear you will not let this get you discouraged in any way. These are lessons I have learned personally over the past 6 years and I wish I had someone giving me the following advice. It has been frustrating at times (to say the very least), but I have learned a great deal compared to when I was strictly a WI whitetail hunter. and so will you.
Do not rely on the locals, especially those who own hunting related stores. I have a story about one such archery shop owner in Pagosa Springs that I now kindy refer to as "Lying Larry". Hunting is good for their business and economy. Those who are local residents likely hunt themselves and won't be cluing you in on what they have learned over their lifetime out of the kindness of their hearts. They see out of state hunters every year looking for the same thing you are looking for.
If you are going in 5 miles, you won't be strolling out and heading to town mid-week. First, you won't want to make that trek but one more time. You will be questioning your sanity later in the week wondering "am I seriously going to make at least two trips to pack this animal out if I get one." Second and more important, if you really want an elk you can't afford to waste an hour much less a day.....Trust me on that! If you pack in - stay in. You will be glad you did.

Take the other gentleman's advice about taking the first legal animal you have an opportunity to take.....It may be the only animal you see. Don't let the TV shows set the wrong expectations. This is really big country. Elk are not like whitetails where they circle around and go back to their home area if they get pushed. Elk clear out. Look for fresh sign - bite marks on the aspens, droppings.

Use your nose! Elk have a distinct musky smell. If they're close and upwind of you, you'll smell them.

You absolutely need to get away from the roads to get away from the people and into elk. This is easier said than done, especially if you haven't hunted country like this. It's intimidating when you first get in it, but then you figure out how to read the land. Consider this first hunt a scouting trip. I call it hiking with a weapon.

Go in as light as possible without sacrificing your safety. Every single ounce counts when the hunt is being done on foot.

Get a good elk hunting instructional book.
Do your physical preparation (I hike a ski hill). You can't over prepare for the hunt you're doing. It will take 3 days to get your wind then you'll feel like you can run a marathon.

Do your mental preparation. You might only see some distant elk, if any at all that first year. If you get into some stalk situations, consider that a triumph. If you get one.....Congratulations and savor every single bite of the best meat on earth!
I didn't intend to write a book here, but I have been where you are now. I know the excitement that has consumed you. Enjoy it because it will likely be shattered during this trip. A hunt like this leaves you exhausted, physically and mentally. You question your sanity for all the hours and money you poured into preparing for what was supposed to be the trip of a lifetime only to leave you wondering if there is an elk in the state at all.....but then you can't miss seeing your elk on another guy's truck! After all the disappointment and frustration, you will have your new and improved game plan for the following year decided before you even get home. Welcome to the addiction of elk hunting!

Feel free to send me a PM if I can help you further. I have researched a lot of gear as well.

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  #53  
Old 06-17-2013, 08:06 AM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Fairview Alfa, Louisiana
Posts: 203
Re: Need advice for Colorado elk hunt

And I thought I was the only guy that felt this way and wants to spend more on gear only to torture myself more severely . The only accurate info I have ever gotten from a local that didnot. involve him making a buck was the location of the city dump.
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  #54  
Old 06-17-2013, 12:27 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Rapid City SD
Posts: 321
Re: Need advice for Colorado elk hunt

I'll echo all the comments on doing what you can to prepare for altitude sickness. I lived in southern KY for 4.5 years and the altitude was 600ft at the highest point in the county. TN is not much different your states highest altitude is lower that the starting point for your hunt. I have spent about 15 years backpacking in the Rockies and only had altitude sickness one time and ill not do that again. I was young and in good shape and thought i could run up the side of the mountains. I didn't really notice the lack of oxygen but when i got to camp the first night which was only about 8500 ft I felt like crap! I laid in the tent all the next day wondering what went wrong. A few years later i took several friends and one of the guys brought his girlfriend and she got it so bad we had to carry her down. My best advice is take it slow and rest ALOT as you are packing in. It does not mean you are a wuss it means you are smart; the longer your body has to acclimate the better you will feel. I would hate to loose a day if i only had 8 to hunt. Stop and look at stuff smell the flowers talk to people on the trail anything to keep yourself from getting too excited and rushing.

AS for skills you should work on orienteering pick a point on your map and get there using just a compass. Gps receivers get broke and Colorado is a big place to be lost.

Pack light! Every pound will feel like 10 when you are on the side of a steep mountain.

If you are walking in you will have to bone out the entire elk to get it home. Don't forget the knife sharpener and a tarp to keep the dirt and grass off the meat. Just plan on spending a whole day boning the elk out because it will save you two days of packing quarters out.

Man i hope you have fun it sounds like a great trip!
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