Long Range Hunting Online Magazine


Go Back   Long Range Hunting Online Magazine > Hunting > Backpack Hunting


Reply

Equipment for Backpack Hunting

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #29  
Old 12-20-2007, 09:52 AM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: San Jose, Ca
Posts: 268
Here is a cool light weight idea and cheap.

Beverage-can stove - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tu.tv - Videos - Como hacer un fogon de emergencia

SES50
__________________
Firearms stand next in importance to the Constitution itself. They are the American people's liberty teeth and keystone under independence. The very atmosphere of firearms everywhere restrains evil interference. - George Washington

Peace is that brief glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading.' -Unknown
Reply With Quote
  #30  
Old 12-20-2007, 10:56 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Missoula, MT USA
Posts: 278
Quote:
Originally Posted by billtyler View Post
Sounds like TS simply has an axe to grind against the company and is offering an opinion on something he’s never tried.

Also, water-purification pumps are light---much lighter than carrying around bottles of water for 4 hours waiting for the tablets to take effect. If you’ve been sweating and are dehydrated, a pump produces instant results.
A couple of things. I do have a bone to pick with Cabela's as I've owned a lot of the things that they refer to as "outfitter series" and they have all crapped out on me, from cloths to waders to packs. I have used that Alaskan pack though I never owned one and it is certainly significantly heavier than the alternative. As far as water, what I like to do is have a few plastic bottles that are light and pack small so that I can be drinking out of one or two while another one is chlorinating. There are also instant purification methods that don't require a filter. I do a lot of winter mountaineering and sometimes that means melting snow and if you're gonna melt it you might as well boil it which also takes care of parasites and bacteria. Chances are that if you're backpacking there is minimal risk of giardia and though I won't suggest it to anyone, I often drink right out of a small creek or spring. I don't like the filters because they can freeze and the housing can crack which renders them useless. Make sure you purge your filter of all water if you're going to expose it to freezing temps. Sometimes the hose will get blocked with ice or the whole filter will be clogged with tiny ice crystals.
Reply With Quote
  #31  
Old 12-26-2007, 11:34 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Troutslayer View Post
A couple of things. I do have a bone to pick with Cabela's as I've owned a lot of the things that they refer to as "outfitter series" and they have all crapped out on me, from cloths to waders to packs. I have used that Alaskan pack though I never owned one and it is certainly significantly heavier than the alternative. As far as water, what I like to do is have a few plastic bottles that are light and pack small so that I can be drinking out of one or two while another one is chlorinating. There are also instant purification methods that don't require a filter. I do a lot of winter mountaineering and sometimes that means melting snow and if you're gonna melt it you might as well boil it which also takes care of parasites and bacteria. Chances are that if you're backpacking there is minimal risk of giardia and though I won't suggest it to anyone, I often drink right out of a small creek or spring. I don't like the filters because they can freeze and the housing can crack which renders them useless. Make sure you purge your filter of all water if you're going to expose it to freezing temps. Sometimes the hose will get blocked with ice or the whole filter will be clogged with tiny ice crystals.

I understand some gear didn’t work out for you (I’ve owned high-end “alternatives” that haven’t worked out either which goes to show $$$ isn’t always the answer), but I’m still failing to see what your dislike of Cabela’s products has to do with Wal-Mart??? My interpretation of your final point in your initial response was that you consider Cabela’s a “big-box” retailer and that alone—not necessarily the gear they carry—influences you to shop elsewhere and is a reason you’re advising others to do the same.

On the pack-weight issue, I still disagree. In my opinion the difference between a good empty pack frame and empty internal-frame pack is negligible, and in my experience it’s much easier to carry loads secured to a rigid frame than with a pack that allows weight to shift with each step. Just my thoughts, no big deal.

It doesn’t matter how “light” and “small” the bottles are—water weighs the same no matter what you’re putting it in. You’re still talking about carrying around a bunch of H2O for hours waiting for the tablets to work. Your points against a filter cracking and purging the unit are very good ones, but what’s to say your spare bottles won’t freeze in the same weather while you’re waiting? Do your pills still work if half the bottle is full of ice? Besides boiling, why aren’t you using any other “instant” methods of purifying without filters as you stated, instead of waiting 4 hours for fresh water???

Melting snow is terrific advice, but what do backpacking and giardia have to do with each other?!?! Does the bacteria not like the backcountry or something?? You can pick it up (as well as a host of other micro-nasties) in numerous places!
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 12-28-2007, 04:10 PM
Silver Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Missoula, MT USA
Posts: 278
Quote:
Originally Posted by billtyler View Post
I understand some gear didn’t work out for you (I’ve owned high-end “alternatives” that haven’t worked out either which goes to show $$$ isn’t always the answer), but I’m still failing to see what your dislike of Cabela’s products has to do with Wal-Mart??? My interpretation of your final point in your initial response was that you consider Cabela’s a “big-box” retailer and that alone—not necessarily the gear they carry—influences you to shop elsewhere and is a reason you’re advising others to do the same.
I guess you didn't read the part where I said I bought a lot of equipment from them and it failed miserably. As a hunting guide I would always see these people from the south show up for a hunt with a wal-mart sleeping bag. They were huge and bulky, heavy, and never kept anyone warm. This has nothing to do with me being down on big box stores, just trying to say that there's no excuse for poor quality crap in the backcountry, and I'm not talking about the slackcountry where you're a half days walk from your truck. I mean the real backcountry where things going wrong can have serious and even fatal consequences. I feel like you're just trying to draw me into an argument with you and this will be my last response to this thread.
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 12-29-2007, 11:20 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 9
No, no--not trying to make an agrument at al. . . sorry if it came out that way, just debating a little. Not sure you solved anything in the end, but consider it dropped. . .
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 12-31-2007, 05:12 PM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Cashmere, Washington
Posts: 4
Nimrod Pack Systems

Have any of you tried out the packs made in Washington by Nimrod Pack Systems. This guy makes amazing gear. A lot of thought goes into his gear. He is also a hunter and outdoorsman so everything is tested and any possible bug worked out before it hits the market. All of his gear is also made in Washington state in the good ol' USA. I own one of almost everything he makes.... and so do all my friends. Our hunting camp looks like the Nimrod shop! Try them out if you have not. You will not be sorry.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 02-06-2008, 10:46 PM
Platinum Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Back in the south -NW FL..
Posts: 1,142
I'm getting a hennessy hammock w/cold weather underliner ,I Hate sleeping on the ground w/a pad..

You won't go wrong w/the Kifaru stuff and it's American made -something we should all think about when we can...

For bags a western mountaineering is also on my need list.

I have a small titanium cylinder stove w/a 6' pipe -as stated a heated shelter is super nice ,you can tend to the fire -cook -dry out your stuff with the warm dry heat.
It packs down small and is worth every penny.

Lightweight backpacking is contagious -i have my summer stuff all together -right down to lightweight boots -knife -etc..
Get a warmer bag than you think you'll need ,i found this out the hard way.
If you expect 30* temps take 20* bag.

Only buy titanium pots etc. when you are standing at the bottom of a mountain facing a 2,000' climb every ounce counts ,you'll remember every penny you saved everytime you stop for a breather....
Good luck -Mike
__________________
AIPAC for president !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads for: Equipment for Backpack Hunting
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Equipment And Planning For Backpack Hunting by Allen Jones ADMIN Technical Articles - Discussion 10 12-23-2012 12:02 PM
Backpack hunting question Donger Backpack Hunting 11 10-18-2010 08:16 PM
Spotting scope tripods for backpack hunting... jmden Long Range Scopes and Other Optics 5 08-03-2007 06:54 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Management Powered by vBadvanced CMPS
All content ©2010-2014 Long Range Hunting, LLC