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Advice on backpack hunt gear list

 
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  #22  
Old 03-25-2011, 10:58 AM
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Re: Advice on backpack hunt gear list

The stove will lower condensation when going, but the condensation will start to build up as soon as it goes out, especially in a wet environment (raining) with wet gear you are trying to dry off. Still way better than anything else out there. A liner will help keep you from brushing up against the condensation and a design with a significant amount of adjustable venting will help with the condensation as well. I also would think that a real floor helps keep condensation at bay, especially if the ground is wet to begin with. If the ground is wet in your tent, it seems to me that that is just one more thing that you are then trying to dry out, which adds further to the condensation on the walls of the tent. Sure would be nice if someone made a design to deal with all those factors, huh?
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  #23  
Old 03-25-2011, 11:10 AM
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Re: Advice on backpack hunt gear list

Quote:
Originally Posted by jmden View Post
The stove will lower condensation when going, but the condensation will start to build up as soon as it goes out, especially in a wet environment (raining) with wet gear you are trying to dry off. Still way better than anything else out there. A liner will help keep you from brushing up against the condensation and a design with a significant amount of adjustable venting will help with the condensation as well. I also would think that a real floor helps keep condensation at bay, especially if the ground is wet to begin with. If the ground is wet in your tent, it seems to me that that is just one more thing that you are then trying to dry out, which adds further to the condensation on the walls of the tent. Sure would be nice if someone made a design to deal with all those factors, huh?

I'll be watching as your website gets farther along, and talk to you before buying a shelter. I want to get an accurate weight of what all I am carrying, and how much room I will need before taking that step. Right now my list has the Kifaru Sawtooth due to weight, but I am still trimming weight off the rest of it which will give me more room to work with. A warm dry shelter is at the top of my priority list for later season hunting.

Thanks for the update also, its nice to hear from someone who has used the stove I'm looking at. If you load it up good how long will it burn on average without adding wood? I see the bigger models have more capacity, but start to get heavy.
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  #24  
Old 03-25-2011, 01:40 PM
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Re: Advice on backpack hunt gear list

The Parastove might last 15-25 minutes completely loaded, depending on the amount of air you give to it. The thing is an amazing inferno when you get good dry wood in it and fully load it. I've had 1 ft. + flame shooting out the top of the chimney many times and the entire assembly glowing red--pretty impressive.

In an 8' dia. x 5'6" tall tipitent, in dry conditions and single digit temps, that stove will drive you out of the tent at full bore--you need to fire it pretty hot to boil stuff in a reasonable amount of time. More than once I've been down to my underwear pressed against the tent wall trying to stay cool in single digit temps.

In a 7' tall, ~ 10' dia. tipitent, the Parastove does not have enough ummmphh in wet conditions, however. Small size stove was better for that. Wet conditions is when you need the stove the most to dry stuff off, etc., as well, so I've just resigned myself to carrying a bit more weight if conditions warrant. However, I typically basically have camp in a ways and usually don't plan on moving it--thinking may be different if someone is planning on moving everyday.
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In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. Genesis 1:1

"And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are the gift of God?" Thomas Jefferson - Notes on the State of Virginia

www.wildsidesystems.com - Shelter for Your WildSide - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tYwgo...&feature=g-upl
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  #25  
Old 03-25-2011, 03:21 PM
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Re: Advice on backpack hunt gear list

I have a couple of comments. I have the Kiraru 4 man tent with stove. When you get cold wet weather, it is a lifesaver. The stove is small and it is difficult to keep burning for a long time. It helps to have a small saw to cut short wood. I use a Gerber folding saw (about 5 oz.).

Stove can be hard to start. I usually take some sort of fire starter to make it easier. Hard to do with just a match or bic lighter.

I use a 3/8 foam pad to sleep on (about 8 oz. for full length). You need some good insulation under you to keep warm. If there is pine duff where you're going, you can do that in addition. 3/8" isn't much padding, but maybe you're younger than I am (NM is rocky). When it is really cold, or for a long hunt, I take a short thin thermarest on top of the 3/8 blue foam. That adds about 13 oz. but sometimes it is worth it. I've never tried a space blanket, but I'm guessing it isn't as much insulation as 3/8" foam.
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  #26  
Old 03-25-2011, 04:47 PM
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Re: Advice on backpack hunt gear list

I upgraded my sleeping pad to a thermarest Pro-lite plus in the 20x72 size and left out the heavy space blanket. I am looking at taking a sheet of tyvek for a floor if I use the Kifaru. I haven't decided what to use for a sleeping bag yet, I was looking at the thermarest Haven which is a 20 degree bag that only weighs 24oz, but it looks like a pain to get in and out of. I am still weighing options there. I will likely sleep in expedition weight long underwear top and bottom if it is cold, so I need a bag that will make up for the rest after the stove goes out.

I have a Gerber folding saw also for wood cutting, also has a bone blade.

I always carry a firesteel, small bic lighter, and a pill bottle full of cotton balls coated in vaseline. They light easy with either the steel or lighter, and I thought they would work for lighting the stove. I was thinking stick one on a piece of bark or something flat light it, and then build the fire on top of it. They will burn for 5 minutes or so once lit.

If I can figure out how to get my updated list posted here from excel I will this evening. If not I will wait until I get my postage scale and have accurate weights to do it.
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  #27  
Old 03-25-2011, 05:07 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2010
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Re: Advice on backpack hunt gear list

Quote:
Originally Posted by mcseal2 View Post

I always carry a firesteel, small bic lighter, and a pill bottle full of cotton balls coated in vaseline.
Me too
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  #28  
Old 03-25-2011, 05:56 PM
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Re: Advice on backpack hunt gear list

I know there's lots of ideas out there of how to start a fire, but this has worked very well in the Kifaru stoves for me:

Diamond Strike-a-Fire Matches at REI.com

I use 1/4 of a stick at a time and have a quick fire in the morning and a cooking/dry off/warm up fire at night, so I use 1 full stick every 2 days. Use a butane lighter to light it.

At freezing and below, butane starts to not work so well, so you need to keep the butane warm or warm it up a bit before use for it to work well, or at all, in colder temps. Pretty much won't work in single digit temps unless you warm it up first, so always have a very valid backup to these otherwise convenient lighters.

My preference on saws, work well for bone and wood:

Amazon.com: 12" Mini Dandy Saw with Scabbard: Sports & Outdoors

These ain't a toy--they work well and fast and in my opinion, worth the little bit more weight they might be. The hand position is optimal and you can cut a lot of wood/bone quickly. I've had the fanno saws, the gerber saws, oregon saws, etc. and this one put 'em all to shame. Really shortens the woodcutting chore time for me anyway. JMHO
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In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. Genesis 1:1

"And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are the gift of God?" Thomas Jefferson - Notes on the State of Virginia

www.wildsidesystems.com - Shelter for Your WildSide - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tYwgo...&feature=g-upl
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