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Reading The Wind by Shawn Carlock

 
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  #29  
Old 01-18-2012, 10:21 PM
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Re: Reading The Wind by Shawn Carlock

Fair enough! Sounds like you have had some good instructors in your past. My instructor is a good for nothin dumbass! Every time I walk in front of a mirror I see him!
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  #30  
Old 01-18-2012, 10:35 PM
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Re: Reading The Wind by Shawn Carlock

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigngreen View Post
I've found dialing to be very precise and suited very well for shooting the wind at game animals. I generally monitor the wind movement for quite a while to find the lull or peak of the wind I'm wanting to shoot and watch how it moves over the terrain then dial for the condition I'm shooting. Holding wind just hasn't worked well for me, holding 6 or 8 MOA of takes the riticule of the animal and I loose the bracketing ability that I like and at some of the longer ranges holding is just not precise enough.
If I miss clean on my first shot there won't be a second one and we stop and figure out what went wrong, in the case I hit but am of I hold the same hold and take the spot on the reticule where the bullet hit and use that spot for the hold and send the second one fast for a TKO!!
I know what you mean about holding at the longer ranges not being very precise. I dont't shoot MOA reticles, all I shoot is MIL/MIL and I love it. It doesnt get any simpler than that. The reticle has plenty of hold and there's no math involved. What you see is what you get. For example let say you shoot at a target at 800y and you miss it left by 1.5 mils. all you have to do is move the reticle 1.5 mils towards the target pull the trigger and there;s the hit. Simple.!!!

Now...as for holding at really long ranges where one seems to be holding in open space with no reference, Horus has a solution. the H58 and H59 reticle. It was made for holding. Look into it. I've shot it. it takes a little bit to get use to it but once past that , i think its good reticle for long ranges with wind.

R>
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  #31  
Old 01-19-2012, 11:00 AM
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Re: Reading The Wind by Shawn Carlock

bigngreen,
i just read my reply and since it was late i'm not sure I answered your question properly.

So you're asking how can I tell what an accurate correction is after the gun has recoiled, right?
I haven't found it to be an issue. Proper position and driving the gun properly allows you to see the hit well enough to make an accurate correction. Now will the correction be accurate enough to stack rounds in a group, maybe, maybe not, depending on the shot, but that's not what we're after. We're looking for a solid hit center mass.

Also, let me ask you guys a question. You mentioned it and so did Shawn. Why do you think holding isn't accurate enough? Instead of using the center of the reticle, one used the lateral markings. What kind of reticle are you guys shooting? Do you have markings going out left and right of center?
I'm shooting an S&B with a P4F reticle.

Sorry I was tired on the previous post.
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  #32  
Old 01-19-2012, 11:40 AM
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Re: Reading The Wind by Shawn Carlock

I shoot the gen 2 reticle from premier with hash @ 1/2 mil and dot @ 1mil. If my math is correct my first hash would represent 8.6" at 500yds. If I had a rifle that would allow me to hold my POA and call my POI then a quick follow up shot using reticle hold would be ethical if practiced previously. At 1000 it would be different because each mark on my reticle now represents 17.2" which I would hardly call precision shooting. Basically with my reticle your holding roughly 1.75moa which most don't consider precision shooting however at short yardages is good enough for a center mass follow up. I believe what Shawn is trying to teach is a more precise way of doping the wind directed towards teaching people how to make more one shot kills. When it comes to having to make follow up shots there is good in both of your methods. Every situation is unique and you have to decide what is appropriate for any given situation.

P.S. It was me who asked the question you were trying to answer.
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  #33  
Old 01-19-2012, 12:47 PM
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Re: Reading The Wind by Shawn Carlock

Oh ok!
So you have a mil reticle? what about your knobs, are they mil too? The reason I ask is because you have mil reticle but you talk about MOA.
.1 mil is .36" at 100y so at 500 .1 mil is 1.8 inches, so .5 mils (1/2 mil) @ 500 is 9 inches.

You're talking about precision, and unless one has a reticle with .1mil hash marks I would tend to agree with you. I'm not talking about that kind of shooting. I'm talking about making a quick hit on chest size target, whether animal or otherwise.
If we're talking about very precise shooting, having all the time we need to wait for conditions to match the scope etc...etc... then we're taking about 2 different things.

IMO if that was the case, then those details should have been clarified from the beginning in the article and this conversation. I think it's an important destingtion to new shooters are trying to find their nitch. Tactical precision shooting and BR shooting are very different things and TTPs are very different. Even tactical shooting between military and LE is very different. LEO's need to be more precise than military even though their average engagements are MUCH shorter than military, but neither have the luxury to wait until conditions match the scope dial to take the shot, and more importantly if the shot is missed, it needs to be made up yesterday, and that's not happening if you are dialing in new adjustments. The same principal can be applied to hunting, if the first round is a miss, I want to make the second one as fast as possible, before the prey get's spooked and runs off. It's even more importantly is if the first hit was a bad one, the second one needs to happen right away before the wounded animal runs off and suffers needlessly.
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  #34  
Old 01-19-2012, 12:53 PM
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Re: Reading The Wind by Shawn Carlock

Oh ok!
So you have a mil reticle? what about your knobs, are they mil too? The reason I ask is because you have mil reticle but you talk about MOA.
.1 mil is .36" at 100y so at 500 .1 mil is 1.8 inches, so .5 mils (1/2 mil) @ 500 is 9 inches.
I my experience even with .5 mil marks one can still hold .25 (1/4) mil with good accuracy. I guess accuracy needed is based on the mission and requirements of it.

I guess you're talking about precision, and unless one has a reticle with .1mil hash marks I would tend to agree with you. I'm not talking about that kind of shooting. I'm talking about making a quick hit on chest size target, whether animal or otherwise. Even for hunting that precision isn't really required.
If we're talking about very precise shooting, having all the time we need to wait for conditions to match the scope etc...etc... then we're taking about 2 different things.

IMO if that was the case, then those details should have been clarified from the beginning in the article and this conversation. I think it's an important destingtion to new shooters are trying to find their nitch. Tactical precision shooting and BR shooting are very different things and TTPs are very different. Even tactical shooting between military and LE is very different. LEO's need to be more precise than military even though their average engagements are MUCH shorter than military, but neither have the luxury to wait until conditions match the scope dial to take the shot, and more importantly if the shot is missed, it needs to be made up yesterday, and that's not happening if you are dialing in new adjustments. The same principal can be applied to hunting, if the first round is a miss, I want to make the second one as fast as possible, before the prey get's spooked and runs off. It's even more importantly is if the first hit was a bad one, the second one needs to happen right away before the wounded animal runs off and suffers needlessly.
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  #35  
Old 01-19-2012, 02:05 PM
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Re: Reading The Wind by Shawn Carlock

Last time I checked, 1 mil at 100 yards was about 3.5 inches???? I could be wrong.

Reread last post and realized there was a . in front of the mil for 100 yds. I use MOA and always holdover for wind with the reticle on the Huskemaw having 8 lines on each side. The wind dope is inscribed on the turret for the load that I'm using.
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Last edited by paphil; 01-19-2012 at 02:17 PM. Reason: reread previous post
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