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Precision Reloading For Long Range Hunting by Jerry Teo

 
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Old 10-09-2007, 04:29 PM
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Precision Reloading For Long Range Hunting by Jerry Teo

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Old 10-09-2007, 10:58 PM
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Jerry
Excellent article and I am in 100% agreement with most of it.
There are a few things I do different though. I do use a Lee hand primer on occasion but I donít get the feel I get with my RCBS bench primer. Honestly itís to the point that it pisses me off every time I use the Lee primer, but then I have used the RCBS for over 30 years and only got the Lee in the last couple so maybe that has something to do with it.
I like either a full length bushing die or a full length die that has had the neck reamed for the proper neck tension. Like Jerry I do not like having the expander ball pulled through the neck after resizing, it can cause crooked necks.
With moderate loads the Lee collet dies work great but with hot loads the case really needs to be FL sized each time for easy chambering. Jerryís idea of using the body die with the collet die is great though if you want to run the cases through the die twice to resize, and thereís nothing wrong with that. I also do that when using the Redding competition neck sizing die. I also I still use the Lee collet die with a few rifles too. If you load light enough that you donít need to FL size it sure is great to not need to remove resizing lube.
Iíll give this article 5 stars and 2 thumbs up.
Good job Jerry
James
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Old 10-11-2007, 12:54 PM
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good stuff

James, thanks for the complements on the article.

I do use FL sizing dies for a few cartridges and been lucky, no runout. Where I find FL sizing to be necessary is in big boomer magnums.

Even though my smaller cartridges are run at similar pressures, they don't expand as much as cases like the RUM. The 223 can take all manner of abuse before needing to be shoulder bumped but the RUM needs FL sizing everytime. The RUM rifle has no headspace issues.

My guess is that the amount/duration of pressure is more severe in the larger case leading to more 'permanent' change in the case. The smaller case has the same/similar peak pressure but less of it so the brass can take more shots before growing.

Just a SWAG theory.

At any rate, function in the field is paramount so size the cases to ensure 100% function.

Jerry
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Old 10-22-2007, 05:50 PM
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Great article. I am fairly new to reloading, what do you mean by runout?
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Old 10-22-2007, 08:37 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eyedoc View Post
Great article. I am fairly new to reloading, what do you mean by runout?
Welcome to the site. Check out this thread
bullet runout

Runout is essentially how straight your reloaded round is. If your chamber is perfectly straight/square and the brass is perfectly consistent in thickness (not gonna happen) then straight rounds are easy to make.

Runout is measured in 1/1000" of an inch with fixtures like this, Concentricty Gauge

With good brass and good processes, you should be able to get .002" or less runout.

HTH

AJ
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Old 10-22-2007, 08:45 PM
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Runout refers to the bullet not being completely centered in the cartridge case, major culprits being crooked, out of round necks and poor bullet seating.


Great article, never thought about the case weight versus volume thing, and I think you're dead on with that, if I ever get that anal with my brass, I'll measure volume not weight.

I however don't think that the CCI primers not showing pressure signs is a good thing. They're just harder and don't show it, doesn't mean the pressure isn't there. I much prefer the federal primers for that reason, I can tell when I'm pushing max pressure when my primers start to flatten a bit, with the CCI's you might see extractor flow at almost the same time as those hard things start showin' you anything.
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Old 10-24-2007, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by devildoc View Post
I however don't think that the CCI primers not showing pressure signs is a good thing. They're just harder and don't show it, doesn't mean the pressure isn't there. I much prefer the federal primers for that reason, I can tell when I'm pushing max pressure when my primers start to flatten a bit, with the CCI's you might see extractor flow at almost the same time as those hard things start showin' you anything.
I have always found that the CCI primer showed pressure signs before the extractor marks showed up.

With the common practise of removing any slop in the action lockup, 'safe' chamber pressures have increased. I am not saying a huge increse, but definitely to the magnum+ range. Many of todays powders burn their best at magnum or slightly higher pressures. Low velocity variations and greatly reduced stringing are usually the benefits.

That provides a huge benefit in giving us accurate ammo for LR hits.

The CCI primer will not let get you to the point of locking up or grenading your action, but it will allow for a few more PSI's before flattening out when compared to the Fed.

Why is reducing runout important? Imagine that the bullet is 'crocked' as viewed down the bore. That bullet now engraves in the lands with the point off center. As it spins and leaves the barrel, it will fly wobbly like a poorly thrown football - each end wobbling around the path of flight. Pin point accuracy isn't going to happen.

The closer you can get that bullet centered on the rifling the more true the bullet will spin as it leaves. This reduces dispersion/inaccuracy at distance.

Jerry
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