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Would gunsmithing be a good second job?

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  #15  
Unread 03-24-2013, 03:22 PM
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Re: Would gunsmithing be a good second job?

A manufacturing license is needed if he wants to build / assemble and sell a custom rifle for profit. If he just wants to install triggers or do repair work a regular FFL is only needed. The manufacturing license was suggested because then he can do both with no worries. I know this cause the Pittsburgh ATF office told me when I applied for mine. Don't want to start any wars here just trying to help the guy out. This subject has been beat to death on many forums before. If you don't believe us then just give the ATF A call.
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  •   #16  
    Unread 03-24-2013, 03:45 PM
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    Re: Would gunsmithing be a good second job?

    Without the knowledge and experience he won't be putting any customs on the shelf to sell.
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    "Shoots real good!": definition; it didn't blow-up in my face. 1993 graduate Montgomery Community College 2yr. gunsmithing program
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      #17  
    Unread 03-24-2013, 04:11 PM
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    Re: Would gunsmithing be a good second job?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Hairtrigger View Post
    No One says you must start with a full blown shop and 50k in tools.
    Perhaps trigger work, stock modification, scope mounting...pick jobs that suit your abilities from an extra room and grow the business.
    That is more what I had in mind. Maybe be able to re-barrel to a different chambering and do muzzle brakes. and that sort of thing. Smaller jobs. If I was to build a rifle if would be for me or my family or maybe a friend or two. Mostly I just like taking things and making them better. Like when I tear down my four wheelers and turn them into fire breathing monsters that are a work of art. I have even built a long travel sand rail from the ground up that cost more to build itself than what I have been seeing on here cost wise for tools to start up. It turned out to be a money losing endeavor when the market crashed with the economy. Oh well, I learned alot.

    I pulled the barrel on my sons Savage and sent it to the gunsmith that made the muzzle brake for him. When I got the barrel back with the brake installed I reinstalled it in the action. I enjoyed this and found it very simple. Thus that is what peaked my interest in doing something along this line. with having 7 days off every other week, you can blow through money pretty quick. They say that idleness is the devil's hand's is very true. I need to stay busy and if I can do that without always spending money then that is good. I already have a good number of tools and I buy the good stuff, I don't believe in having to buy the most expensive but good tools are a must and keeping them clean and cared for is something I always do. I don't have a mill or lathe yet but they are something I have been thinking about.
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      #18  
    Unread 03-24-2013, 04:41 PM
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    Re: Would gunsmithing be a good second job?

    The way it was explained to me by the local ATF agent was I should have a #7 if I'm building rifles from the ground up but you can do rebarrels/build a rifle from someone's action with a #1. So technically if you sell someone the action and then they hire you to build a rifle from it you can get away with a #1. The local agent agreed but said I should really have a #7. With a #7 you can build up to 50 rifles a year before you have to pay extra in taxes. So basically custom rifle building should have a #7 and general gunsmithing can be done with a #1.

    That is how my ATF guy read it but, as is common with the government, not everyone will read it the same way and not even another ATF agent.
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      #19  
    Unread 03-24-2013, 05:53 PM
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    Re: Would gunsmithing be a good second job?

    Thats right
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      #20  
    Unread 03-24-2013, 06:04 PM
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    Join Date: Aug 2011
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    Re: Would gunsmithing be a good second job?

    I don't think you would need anywhere near $50 k for tooling. Like I said, you can probably get a nice south bend and enough tooling to do muzzle brakes, crowns, contours and the likes for under $10k, and that might get you a mill as well. You just need to get a big enough lathe to thread the barrel between centers if at all possible. Some would say to run a steady rest, but the chances of error start climbing. It's one thing to goof on your own gun, but customers are less forgiving.

    The other plus thing is with the lathe and mill, they are not just for gunsmithing. They are capable of making all kinds of parts for your car hobby. Then all you need to do is get into backyard metal casting and you'll find yourself out of time to get bored
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      #21  
    Unread 03-24-2013, 06:19 PM
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    Re: Would gunsmithing be a good second job?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by IdahoCTD View Post
    The way it was explained to me by the local ATF agent was I should have a #7 if I'm building rifles from the ground up but you can do rebarrels/build a rifle from someone's action with a #1. So technically if you sell someone the action and then they hire you to build a rifle from it you can get away with a #1. The local agent agreed but said I should really have a #7. With a #7 you can build up to 50 rifles a year before you have to pay extra in taxes. So basically custom rifle building should have a #7 and general gunsmithing can be done with a #1.

    That is how my ATF guy read it but, as is common with the government, not everyone will read it the same way and not even another ATF agent.
    Gee, thats what Ruling 2010-10 says!
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