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Mauser re-heat treat

 
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  #8  
Old 05-06-2013, 08:30 AM
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Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 5,501
Re: Mauser re-heat treat

I don't know near as much about the Mauser action as Shortgrass does so take this for what it
is worth.

I steer away from Mauser's that were manufactured between 1942 and 1945 because they were
not worrying about quality (They just wanted to turn out as many as possible). Some of these
actions are probably good but some are not so I just avoid them. All of the other years are good
as far as I know. Maybe Ted will comment on this. I would find out what year it was made and
go from there.

Mauser's make fine rifles and millions have been used on custom rifles. The only advice I have is
to use them on standard pressure cartridges (45,000 to 50,000 CUPs) I don't like using them on
the new high pressure cartridges (55,000 to 65,000 PSIs) because they were not designed to handle
pressures that high (Not that they wouldn,t) Just being cautious.

J E CUSTOM
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  #9  
Old 06-16-2013, 02:38 AM
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Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 466
Re: Mauser re-heat treat

I have been sporterizing Mausers for 48 years.
Mausers do not need heat treatment to be safe to shoot.
The strength does not come from heat treat.
They are case hardened to prevent corrosion.

The Keunhausen book on Mausers suggests sending Mausers out for heat treat. That is not a good book. Judging by the Mauser book, he was neither a bright nor organized man, yet he wrote an extremely good book on double action Colts. I suspect he had help from the Colt factory. He needed help on Mausers, and evidently did not get it.

I have tested VZ24s to the point of failing. Converted to magnum bolt face and running ~ 110,000 psi, the abutments start to constrict and the bolt body behind the lugs starts to widen. This interference can be lapped out, and the action is still good.

All this sporterizing Mausers has taught me that most people should not be sporterizing Mausers.
I do it for fun, not because it is cost effective.
Kimber rifles are as good a rifle as I can build from old surplus Mausers.
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  #10  
Old 06-16-2013, 07:20 AM
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 884
Re: Mauser re-heat treat

Quote:
Originally Posted by J E Custom View Post
I don't know near as much about the Mauser action as Shortgrass does so take this for what it
is worth.

I steer away from Mauser's that were manufactured between 1942 and 1945 because they were
not worrying about quality (They just wanted to turn out as many as possible). Some of these
actions are probably good but some are not so I just avoid them. All of the other years are good
as far as I know. Maybe Ted will comment on this. I would find out what year it was made and
go from there.

Mauser's make fine rifles and millions have been used on custom rifles. The only advice I have is
to use them on standard pressure cartridges (45,000 to 50,000 CUPs) I don't like using them on
the new high pressure cartridges (55,000 to 65,000 PSIs) because they were not designed to handle
pressures that high (Not that they wouldn,t) Just being cautious.

J E CUSTOM
I had always understood the cutoff to be late 1943, but who really knows? My other mausers are BRNO's made in the early 1920's. They are good to go.

This particular action, as far as I was able to determine, was made some time in 1942. It was a contract rifle made for Hungarian units bound for the eastern front.

I am a sucker for mausers and I enjoy messing with them. I generally agree with you regarding cartridge selection for them. All but one of mine have been chambered for cartridges such as 7x57 and 6.5x55. The lone exception is a 22-250 which has shown itself to be very solid. It shoots really well now that I finally have a decent barrel on it.

Shortgrass once suggested that going with a Mark X type action made of modern steel is the best route to a mauser sporter build. I tend to agree with that for a variety of reasons. Those are the actions that can safely handle modern cartridges with no doubts. The older mausers can be capable of it, but it can be a bit of a judgement call whether or not an individual action will handle it. I'd rather err on the side of the sure bet.
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  #11  
Old 06-16-2013, 07:34 AM
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Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 884
Re: Mauser re-heat treat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark View Post
I have been sporterizing Mausers for 48 years.
Mausers do not need heat treatment to be safe to shoot.
The strength does not come from heat treat.
They are case hardened to prevent corrosion.

The Keunhausen book on Mausers suggests sending Mausers out for heat treat. That is not a good book. Judging by the Mauser book, he was neither a bright nor organized man, yet he wrote an extremely good book on double action Colts. I suspect he had help from the Colt factory. He needed help on Mausers, and evidently did not get it.

I have tested VZ24s to the point of failing. Converted to magnum bolt face and running ~ 110,000 psi, the abutments start to constrict and the bolt body behind the lugs starts to widen. This interference can be lapped out, and the action is still good.

All this sporterizing Mausers has taught me that most people should not be sporterizing Mausers.
I do it for fun, not because it is cost effective.
Kimber rifles are as good a rifle as I can build from old surplus Mausers.
The Kuhnhausen book was one of my primary references when I first started messing with milsurp mausers about a decade ago. An experienced mauser smith such as yourself probably does know enough to recognize places where Kuhnhausen went wrong in his writings. I don't fit in that category. His work was a useful starting place for me, though it did seem to me that the book was written in a defensive, lawyered up manner.

I started doing it because I wanted to learn a bit about gunsmithing and didn't want to experiment on a $500-$700 rifle. At the time I started, I was able to get my hands on worn out 98/22's with solid actions for less than $70. I figured that if I trashed one of these while learning, I could live with the loss.

I learned a lot and developed a deep affection for the old warhorses. It ended up being a gateway drug to much more expensive pursuits. I still mess with them for fun from time to time. Once in awhile, a stray, unloved mauser will follow me home.

You are right that the mausers are probably not cost effective, especially relative to some of the very inexpensive (and surprisingly accurate) factory sporters that can be had these days. I don't pretend that there is anything rational about my gun affliction in general and my mauser addiction in particular. I just like 'em.
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